Author reveals how the forgotten Elizabeth Stuart had her sights set on the throne

Netherlands-based Nadine Akkerman, who recently published her book Elizabeth Stuart: Queen of Hearts, highlighted the portrait, which depicts Elizabeth wearing the Tudor crown

He was unpopular with the British public, eventually being found guilty of treason and executed – yet not everyone in King Charles I’s family was looked down upon, with his sister Elizabeth Stuart proving to be infinitely beloved by his followers.

A fan even created a traitorous portrait that showed the so-called Queen of Hearts as the monarch of England, Scotland and Ireland, according to Netherlands-based author Nadine Akkerman, who said that the painting could have resulted in the death of the owner. execution.

Nadine, who recently published her book Elizabeth Stuart: Queen of Hearts, highlighted the portrait, which depicts Elizabeth – daughter of King James VI and me – wearing an ermine robe and the Tudor crown.

This simple drawing – now part of a private collection in Scotland and first painted by Mr Mierevelt before being altered in the 17th century when Elizabeth’s brother reigned – could have turned out to be a betrayal, if it had been shown to the general. Public.

The Treason Act of the 1530s meant that treason included the mere imagining of the king dying, or being injured, or stripping him of his title, according to History Extra.

Many thought Charles I’s older sister would have made a better monarch, apparently thanks to her fearlessness – she was said to be skilled with a bow and even hunted boars on horseback when pregnant.

Her connection to Elizabeth I, her godmother, also played a role in her popularity, as many supporters saw her as the natural heir or even the reincarnation of the late queen, according to the author.

The royal – who was also the granddaughter of May, Queen of Scots – played into that bond by often sporting the jewels of Elizabeth I.

This simple drawing (pictured) - now part of a private collection in Scotland and was first painted by Mr Mierevelt before being altered in the 17th century when Elizabeth's brother reigned - could have been to prove highly treacherous, had it been shown.  to the general public

This simple drawing (pictured) – now part of a private collection in Scotland and was first painted by Mr Mierevelt before being altered in the 17th century when Elizabeth’s brother reigned – could have been to prove highly treacherous, had it been shown. to the general public

Many believed Charles I's older sister (pictured) made a better monarch, apparently thanks to her fearlessness - she was said to have been skilled with a bow and even hunted boars on horseback when pregnant

Many believed Charles I’s older sister (pictured) made a better monarch, apparently thanks to her fearlessness – she was said to have been skilled with a bow and even hunted boars on horseback when pregnant

Commenting on the portrait of Elizabeth Stuart, Nadine told the publication: ‘I only had an idea of ​​the explosive potential of this portrait when my research revealed that Elizabeth had been considered a serious candidate for the throne of England. .

“To order or possess a painting of Princess Stuart wearing this crown would be to risk a charge of treason.”

Born August 19, 1596, at Falkland Palace, Fifeshire, Scotland, to King James VI and I and his wife Anne of Denmark, Elizabeth was the elder sister of Charles I.

She was first seriously considered as a potential candidate for the crowns of England, Scotland and Ireland after her elder brother Henry died of typhoid in 1612. Her younger brother Charles was still ‘frail and sickly’ .

Elizabeth has repeatedly advocated war on diplomacy, even urging officials to “pray to tell the king [her father] that the enemies will take his blows more into account than his words.

When she was at the British royal court, she was highly sought after, her beauty and charm attracting much attention and leading her to become a favorite subject of poets of the time.

Gustav Adolf of Sweden, Philip III of Spain and Frederick V, the Elector Palatine, all wanted to marry the royal.

And while her mother favored the Spanish match, her father insisted on a marriage between his daughter and Frederick, hoping it would strengthen his ties with German Protestant leaders.

The royal's (pictured) connection to Elizabeth I, her godmother, also played a role in her popularity, as many supporters saw her as the natural heir or even the reincarnation of the late Queen, according to the author

The royal’s (pictured) connection to Elizabeth I, her godmother, also played a role in her popularity, as many supporters saw her as the natural heir or even the reincarnation of the late Queen, according to the author

After the wedding in February 1613, the couple moved to Heidelberg and their first child, Frederick Henry, was born a year later in January.

Their best-known son, Prince Rupert, was born in December 1619, while their daughter’s son, Princess Sophia of the Palatinate, George, became King of Britain in 1714.

Her marriage to Frederick V, Elector Palatine, one of the most powerful princes of the Holy Roman Empire, made them the new power couple of European Protestantism.

In 1619, the Bohemians offered the crown of Bohemia – a historic central European country that was a kingdom of the Holy Roman Empire and later a province of the Austrian Habsburg Empire – to Frederick.

This was in defiance of their Habsburg king Ferdinand, and Frederick was made King Frederick I in November 1619, while Elizabeth was crowned queen.

Yet in November 1620 the Bohemian forces were defeated by the Catholic League acting for Ferdinand (then Holy Roman Emperor).

The royal (pictured) - who was also the granddaughter of May, Queen of Scots - played into that bond by often wearing Elizabeth I's jewelery

The royal (pictured) – who was also the granddaughter of May, Queen of Scots – played into that bond by often wearing Elizabeth I’s jewelery

Elizabeth and Frederick fled, were stripped of their German lands and titles, and exiled to the Dutch Republic.

But that didn’t stop the English and Scots from believing that Elizabeth would one day return as Queen.

Meanwhile, when her brother’s kingdoms later became embroiled in civil war, Elizabeth’s court in The Hague is said to have taken in hundreds of royalist refugees.

Nadine suggests that Elizabeth’s never-failing popularity was apparently reason enough for even her nephew Charles II not to invite her to his coronation in 1661.

Despite public wishes, Elizabeth spent the next 40 years in exile, while her husband died in 1632.

Elizabeth Stuart: Queen of Hearts by Nadine Akkerman is available now

WHO WAS KING CHARLES I AND WHY WAS HE EXECUTED?

King Charles I was born in Fife, Scotland in 1600 and became king in 1625 following the death of his older brother Henry.

The new monarch favored a High Anglican form of worship and his wife, Henrietta Maria of France, was Catholic.

After his succession, Charles fell out with Parliament, which sought to restrict his royal prerogative.

The king believed in the divine right of kings and thought he could rule according to his own conscience. Many of his subjects opposed his policies, particularly the levying of taxes without the consent of Parliament, and perceived his actions as those of a tyrannical monarch.

He then dissolved parliament three times from 1625 to 1629 and decided to rule alone.

This meant that the king had to try to raise funds by non-parliamentary means, which made him unpopular with the British public. He also attempted to impose a new prayer book on the country.

King Charles visited Bramsill House in 1630, under pressure from his subjects following his repeated clashes with Parliament.

King Charles I (with wife Queen Henrietta Maria) was born in Fife, Scotland, and became king aged 24

King Charles I (with wife Queen Henrietta Maria) was born in Fife, Scotland, and became king aged 24

The king, on January 4, 1642, personally tried to arrest five deputies for treason. he entered the Commons accompanied by armed men and the then Speaker, William Lenthal, left the chair for the monarch.

However, he refused to give up on the deputies and made the famous remark ‘May it please your majesty, I have neither eyes to see nor tongue to speak in this place, but as the House is glad to have me lead, whose servant I am here.

The deputies fled, Charles declared “all my birds have flown”, and he retired. He was to be the last monarch to enter the chamber.

The result was the outbreak of civil war after more than 150 years.

In 1646 the Royalists were defeated and Charles then surrendered to the Scots and he later escaped to the Isle of Wight a year later.

Charles was tried for treason by a number of MPs, including Parliamentary General Oliver Cromwell.

He was found guilty and later executed outside the Banqueting House in Whitehall, London.

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