Spanish period – Disturb Media http://disturbmedia.com/ Wed, 13 Oct 2021 09:01:20 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://disturbmedia.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-6-120x120.png Spanish period – Disturb Media http://disturbmedia.com/ 32 32 Britons living in Mallorca have problems obtaining residence permits https://disturbmedia.com/britons-living-in-mallorca-have-problems-obtaining-residence-permits/ https://disturbmedia.com/britons-living-in-mallorca-have-problems-obtaining-residence-permits/#respond Wed, 13 Oct 2021 08:19:00 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/britons-living-in-mallorca-have-problems-obtaining-residence-permits/ It seems that a number of Britons living in Spain still encounter difficulties in obtaining residence permits, some have even been rejected. It is clear that this is all due to Brexit and the UK which is now a ‘third’ country as far as Spain and the EU are concerned, but the Spanish and British […]]]>

It seems that a number of Britons living in Spain still encounter difficulties in obtaining residence permits, some have even been rejected.

It is clear that this is all due to Brexit and the UK which is now a ‘third’ country as far as Spain and the EU are concerned, but the Spanish and British governments spent years preparing for Brexit explaining to Brits wishing to continue to be legally resident in Spain what to do and what the deadlines were.

Some like me I have to admit missed the driver’s license deadline I was a little confused and thought a six month grace period had been introduced but it was not .
However, thanks to the close working relationship between the Spanish and the British, it seems very likely that UK driving licenses will continue to be valid from the end of this month, the current deadline.

But, the bottom line is that all Spanish services are working, the problem still seems to be that a lot of these Brits continue to to have problems were not as legal as they originally should have been and now have difficulty proving that they are entitled to a residence permit.

If you’re legal, it’s a cinch.

I had to renew and modify the data of my social Security medical card last week, the process took less than five minutes.

You can no longer cheat the system.


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X1 Wind completes assembly of Spanish float – reNews https://disturbmedia.com/x1-wind-completes-assembly-of-spanish-float-renews/ https://disturbmedia.com/x1-wind-completes-assembly-of-spanish-float-renews/#respond Wed, 13 Oct 2021 07:54:46 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/x1-wind-completes-assembly-of-spanish-float-renews/ X1 Wind has completed the rotor assembly for its pioneering floating wind platform in Spain. The company’s X30 prototype is now fully assembled in Las Palmas, Gran Canaria, ready for installation. Equipped with a specially adapted Vestas V29 turbine, the unique “downwind” system is able to “wind vane” and orient itself passively with the wind […]]]>

X1 Wind has completed the rotor assembly for its pioneering floating wind platform in Spain.

The company’s X30 prototype is now fully assembled in Las Palmas, Gran Canaria, ready for installation.

Equipped with a specially adapted Vestas V29 turbine, the unique “downwind” system is able to “wind vane” and orient itself passively with the wind to maximize energy efficiency.

The new “tripod-type” platform also features greater structural efficiency, with a lighter, more scalable design, while minimizing environmental impact on the ocean.

Managing Director Alex Raventos said: “We are excited to take this final step as we move towards deployment.

“The rotor assembly represents a symbolic moment in this project, installing the blades that will ultimately harness the wind and demonstrate our leeward design.

“The strong summer trade winds in Gran Canaria caused minor delays after initial loading, but this exciting time allows the assembly process to come to fruition.

“In the coming weeks, we will proceed with the installation of cables and anchors before the platform is parked at a water depth of 50 m for final commissioning.

“From the start, X1 Wind was committed to finding a more efficient structural approach for floating wind power compared to more traditional systems.

“We believe that we have now developed the technology to take full advantage of the marine environment, while respecting the future sustainability of the ocean.

“Our system will result in greater structural efficiency, reducing loads, especially bending moments at the base of the tower, allowing for a lighter design.”

The X1 Wind platform uses the best features of a semi-submersible – with a shallow draft – and the ability to reach deeper water through a leg platform mooring system. tension (TLP) – with a small footprint on the seabed.

Co-founder Carlos Casanovas said the industry-wide approach to onshore turbines has traditionally focused on upwind rotors to avoid the so-called “tower shadow” effect.

However, windward configurations require specific measures to avoid collisions with the towers, with the challenge increasing as the turbine blades lengthen.

Casanovas said: “With more than 100m of blades increasingly prevalent in offshore environments, significant measures are needed to avoid collisions with towers.

“This usually involves increasing the distance between the blades and the tower by applying a tilt and taper angle, and designing more expensive pre-bent and stiffer blades, which also makes them heavier.

“However, with these measures come increased manufacturing complexity, cost and potential loss in power generation.

“Using a downwind configuration reduces the risk of collisions with towers, opening up the possibility of using large-scale wind turbine designs that are lighter, more flexible and therefore less expensive.

“These are key features that will allow the development of future” large scale “leeward structures with research already carried out on 200m blades and 50 MW power ratings.”

The deployment of X1 Wind’s X30 is carried out in conjunction with the revolutionary PivotBuoy project supported by a pan-European consortium comprising the leading companies EDP NEW, DNV, INTECSEA, ESM and DEGIMA and the world-class research centers WavEC, DTU and PLOCAN.

Supported by € 4 million from the European Commission’s H2020 program, PivotBuoy aims to significantly reduce the current discounted cost of electricity (LCOE) of floating wind power.

The main advantages of the PivotBuoy system include reduced float weight, faster and cheaper installation processes and the ability to reach deeper water with a minimal footprint on the seabed thanks to the TLP mooring system.


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Spanish audiobook market to grow exponentially from 2021 to 2026 https://disturbmedia.com/spanish-audiobook-market-to-grow-exponentially-from-2021-to-2026/ https://disturbmedia.com/spanish-audiobook-market-to-grow-exponentially-from-2021-to-2026/#respond Wed, 13 Oct 2021 07:34:31 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/spanish-audiobook-market-to-grow-exponentially-from-2021-to-2026/ The Spanish Audiobooks Research Report provides a comprehensive assessment of this business area. This report also predicts the market share and growth rate of this industry vertical during the forecast period. The study also elucidates all the vital aspects of the Spanish Audiobooks market such as revenue estimates, industry size, and total sales amassed. Moreover, […]]]>

The Spanish Audiobooks Research Report provides a comprehensive assessment of this business area. This report also predicts the market share and growth rate of this industry vertical during the forecast period. The study also elucidates all the vital aspects of the Spanish Audiobooks market such as revenue estimates, industry size, and total sales amassed. Moreover, the study elaborates the details regarding the industry segments as well as the growth drivers that will increase the profitability graph during the analysis period.

The Spanish Audiobooks market size highlights the market essentials, opportunities, regional market, emerging growth factors, market challenges, forecast, and competitors associated with their market share. The industry report also provides a detailed analysis of the present and upcoming opportunities to clarify future investments during the Spanish Audiobooks market forecast from 2020 to 2025.

The Spanish audiobook market with respected geographical perspectives:

  • The Spanish Audiobooks Market report dissects the geographic landscape of this industry with emphasis on regions like North America, APAC, Europe, Middle East, and Africa.
  • Details regarding the sales accumulated by each of the listed geographies and their market share are documented in the report.
  • The growth rate forecasts as well as the profits for each region are shown in the report.

Request a copy of this report @ https://www.nwdiamondnotes.com/request-sample/36490

Additional information that the Spanish Audiobooks Market report contains is presented below:

  • A detailed overview of the competitive landscapes of the Spanish audiobook market has been provided with a key focus on companies like Audible • Book Riot Storytel BookBeat Downpour Hoopla KOBO Libby Nook Audiobooks Scribd SoundCloud Spotify TuneIn.
  • The report also compiles the product catalog of major manufacturers along with their scope.
  • Information relating to the market position and sales made by each of the listed companies is highlighted in the report.
  • The share of the industry held by the major market competitors was also cited in the report.
  • The profit margins and pricing models of these companies are also illustrated in the study.
  • According to the report, the product line of the Spanish audiobook market is segmented into sci-fi audiobook, romantic audiobook, thriller audiobook, children’s audiobook, detective audiobook, and narrative audiobook.
  • Important aspects such as total sales, market share and revenue generated by each product segment were also recorded in this study.
  • The report provides a comprehensive analysis of the application spectrum, which is divided into adults and children, and also shows the industry share, market compensation and sales volume of these application segments during the period. estimated.
  • The study also encompasses all other essential parameters such as market concentration rate and competitive trends.
  • The report further explains the various marketing and distribution channels established by the major players.

Most Important Key Questions This Report Answers:

  • What will be the size, overview and analysis of the Spanish Audiobooks market, growth rate?
  • What are the strengths and weaknesses of the Spanish audiobook market from the major vendors?
  • What are the global growth opportunities and threats facing the Spanish Audiobooks market?
  • What are the restraints, threats and challenges in the Spanish audiobook market?
  • Who are the major key players and competitors in the Spanish audiobook market?
  • what are their main business plans in the spanish audiobook market?

Important features offered and highlights of the reports:

  • Detailed Industry Snapshot
  • Changing industry market dynamics
  • In-depth market segmentation by type, application etc.
  • Historical, current and projected market size in terms of volume and value
  • Recent trends and developments in the Spanish audiobook industry
  • Competitive landscape of the Spanish audiobook market
  • Strategies of key players and product offerings
  • Potential and niche segments / regions showing promising growth

Request customization on this report @ https://www.nwdiamondnotes.com/request-for-customization/36490


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UC Teams Up With Indigenous Academics To Reshape The History Of The California Missions https://disturbmedia.com/uc-teams-up-with-indigenous-academics-to-reshape-the-history-of-the-california-missions/ https://disturbmedia.com/uc-teams-up-with-indigenous-academics-to-reshape-the-history-of-the-california-missions/#respond Tue, 12 Oct 2021 21:57:03 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/uc-teams-up-with-indigenous-academics-to-reshape-the-history-of-the-california-missions/ “If you ask California Indians what they want, one answer would probably be that we want to speak for ourselves and share our views and knowledge,” said Jonathan Cordero, executive director of the Association of Ramaytush Ohlone from the San Francisco Peninsula. In a UCLA-led grant program called Critical Mission Studies, Indigenous scholars and community […]]]>

“If you ask California Indians what they want, one answer would probably be that we want to speak for ourselves and share our views and knowledge,” said Jonathan Cordero, executive director of the Association of Ramaytush Ohlone from the San Francisco Peninsula.

In a UCLA-led grant program called Critical Mission Studies, Indigenous scholars and community members are bringing their lived experiences and ancestral histories to a project that is rewriting the history of the California missions.

They seek to shed light on the brutality and inhumanity experienced by natives in the California missions during Spanish colonization and beyond. Tell the truths about trauma, slavery, genocide and abuse. The truth around centuries of intentional obscurations. The Truth About the Continuing Impact of Settlement Colonialism.

The truth of what it means now to be a native of California, which in part means taking every opportunity to share their truths, Cordero said.

“We want our truths, our stories to be told from the perspective of the average California Indian, from the perspective of the elder who may have even more traditional knowledge,” said Cordero, who is also a visiting professor. at UC Hastings. “We want this to be told from the perspective of those involved in education, of allies, of those of us with masters or doctorates. We want all these perspectives to contribute to the knowledge we have of the period of the mission without privileging one type of knowledge over another.

Portrait of Jonathan Cordero
Jonathan cordero
Courtesy of Jonathan Cordero

Based at UCLA’s Chicano Studies Research Center and launched in 2019, Mission Critical Studies have created opportunities for knowledge sharing thanks to a grant from the Office of Multicampus Research Programs and Initiatives of the President of the University of California.

The program operates with a board of four members of California Indian research partners who endorse and lead the projects that are part of the grant: Valentin Lopez (president of the Amah Mutsun tribal band), Yve Chavez (Tongva), Stan Rodriguez (Santa Ysabel / Kumeyaay) and Cordero.

They frequently collaborate with four academics from across UC who serve as grant administrators: Charlene Villaseñor-Black, UCLA professor of Chicago and Chicano and Central American studies; Renya Ramírez (Ho-Chunk / Ojibwe, enrolled in the Winnebago tribe of Nebraska), professor of anthropology at UC Santa Cruz; Jennifer Scheper Hughes, professor of history at UC Riverside; and Ross Frank, associate professor of ethnic studies at UC San Diego.

Together they guide knowledge production related to the missions in California, by building a body of literature that critically analyzes the period of the missions in California and Spanish colonialism in the Americas.

“We’ve been dealing with the fantastic legacy, the romantic myth of the mission period for a very long time,” Cordero said.

It is all done transparently – and with deference to the California Indian research partners, the California Indian Advisory Council and, ideally, the communities they represent, which has not always been the case here. history of the UC system or in academic work around indigenous peoples. , Cordero said. The advisory board includes representatives from many California Indian communities.

The project has a prescribed protocol for interacting with tribal communities, including guidelines to ensure that academics seek and receive appropriate permissions, that members of the indigenous community retain intellectual property rights and cultural material, and that they control the use and distribution of any newly created digital or printed materials.

Charlène Villasenor Noir
Charlène Villasenor Noir
Courtesy Charlene Villasenor Noir

Advancing a new methodology

Mission Critical Studies advance what are known as “California Indian Studies” and “Mission Studies” and will add breadth and depth to Native American studies in general. Critical mission studies focus on the perspectives, experiences, and cultures of California Indians, using approaches that question conventional scholarship, said Cordero, who is also a visiting scholar at the University of Southern California.

Yves chavez
Yves chavez
Courtesy of Yves Chavez

Chavez, assistant professor of art history and visual culture at UC Santa Cruz, contributes to this body of work in her book that highlights examples of Indigenous agency from 1769 to 1936 via case studies and examples of Aboriginal art, architecture and visual culture. . His current work manuscript was supported by a Mission Critical Studies program grant. Chavez is also one of the first Tongva women to receive a doctorate from UCLA.

Chavez said she believes she may be California’s first Indian art historian and Tongva’s only art historian. It is important for her to prioritize indigenous perspectives in the history of art, in particular a new way of looking at the architecture of the Spanish mission.

“The missions were built by Aboriginal people, and my priority has been to educate others about this story,” she said. “I’m looking for ways my writing can be used in the classroom at the college level, but also to educate the public and make this work accessible to the Indian community in California. “

Providing access to information is a big part of the impetus for mission critical studies, she said. The group is working on a manual that would be accessible to anyone wishing to learn about the missions and experiences of Aboriginal people.

Reveal untold stories

In 1769, long before California became a state, the Spanish ordered the construction of missions to convert hundreds of thousands of native inhabitants to Catholicism and use them as labor. By 1833, when the missions were closed and California was part of Mexico, 21 missions spanned 600 miles and the native population had declined due to disease and exploitation.

Portrait of Val Lopez
Val López
Courtesy of Valentin Lopez

“The truth has never been told about our history,” said Lopez, who is working on his own book that refutes the account that the California Indians voluntarily surrendered to the missions. “Many academics and young people have just learned about the history which is taught in history books. And let me say that when these books were written, they never went to the tribes, they went to the Franciscans or the Catholic Church to find out this story. We just want the truth to be told.

By the time California became a state in 1850, the narrative of the missions as expressed by the Catholic Church dominated. After statehood and as more and more white settlers arrived, Native Californians faced perilous decades of state-sanctioned genocide, as Governor Gavin Newsom officially recognized for the first time in 2019.

To this day, the images of the missions on the flags and seals of the states, the statues of Father Junípero Serra and his beatification are painful symbols of the destruction and domination of the Indians of California, Lopez said.

“They try to present it as a proud, wonderful and glorifying story, when it is all about slavery, incarceration, rape, murder, torture and destruction, destruction of cultural knowledge, destruction of indigenous spiritualities, the indigenous environment and indigenous indigenous knowledge. he said.

Beyond the truth about the brutal impacts of mission history on California tribes, Lopez said he also hoped the Mission Critical Studies project would highlight “the absolute need for writers to recognize and be responsible for this story “.


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Spanish National Day greets Columbus with little opposition https://disturbmedia.com/spanish-national-day-greets-columbus-with-little-opposition/ https://disturbmedia.com/spanish-national-day-greets-columbus-with-little-opposition/#respond Tue, 12 Oct 2021 20:35:03 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/spanish-national-day-greets-columbus-with-little-opposition/ MADRID – Pageantry and a grand military parade marked Spain’s National Day ceremonies in Madrid on Tuesday, eclipsing protests against what some see as a misguided celebration of Spanish colonial history. Members of the cavalry escorted King Felipe VI and Queen Letizia to a platform where the royal couple watched more than 2,600 soldiers parade […]]]>

MADRID – Pageantry and a grand military parade marked Spain’s National Day ceremonies in Madrid on Tuesday, eclipsing protests against what some see as a misguided celebration of Spanish colonial history.

Members of the cavalry escorted King Felipe VI and Queen Letizia to a platform where the royal couple watched more than 2,600 soldiers parade along the flag-lined Paseo de la Castellana. The parade included dozens of planes flying above us and a 21-gun salute.

A paratrooper with a giant red and yellow Spanish flag strapped to his ankle landed on the avenue, eliciting cheers from thousands of spectators.

The Día de la Fiesta Nacional, also known as Dia de la Hispanidad, is a public holiday in Spain. The 1987 law which made October 12 the national holiday declared that it commemorates “the linguistic and cultural projection of Spain outside its European limits”.

The date marks explorer Christopher Columbus’ sighting of the earth on October 12, 1492 as he traveled under royal Spanish sponsorship in search of what would become the Americas. This event heralded centuries of colonization of the Americas by European nations while bringing violence, disease and death to Indigenous peoples.

In Spain, the suffering of indigenous populations during this period has not received the same attention or elicited the type of historical reassessment that it has, for example, in the United States, where in many places Columbus Day was associated or replaced by indigenous peoples. Day to change the focus of annual vacation.

Near where Tuesday’s official National Day celebrations took place in Madrid is a statue of Columbus atop a pedestal. It is 17 meters (56 feet) high.

In the US city of Chicago, by contrast, three statues of Columbus are still in storage by order of the local government after protesters targeted them last summer.

The debate over the historical legacy of Columbus has raged for many years. But it became clearer in the United States after a campaign to remove monuments dedicated to Confederate generals escalated into deadly violence in 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia.

The protests organized to coincide with Spain’s National Day were mainly motivated by other grievances.

The king, for example, received taunts and whistles from people who wanted to abolish the Spanish monarchy. Regional officials fighting for the independence of the Spanish region of Catalonia set to work normally to thumb their noses at the central authorities of the country.

Even the anti-establishment leftist party Unidas Podemos (United We Can) has supported the official ceremonies in Madrid, although the fight against inequality is one of its flagship themes. The leftist party, which is part of the Spanish coalition government, sent its three government ministers to attend the parade.

Socialist Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez sought to focus the celebrations on a more modern appreciation of October 12.

He said the holiday was meant to celebrate “what unites us, what makes us bigger as a society, what makes Spain a friendly, open and diverse country”.

Groups protesting the tribute to Columbus and his legacy staged scattered protests, including in Madrid, although turnout was low.

Joan Felguera, a 17-year-old student participating in a protest in Barcelona against crimes committed by the Spanish colonizers, said people had to choose how to react to what was known of the period.

“History is history,” he said. “But the culture is changing and the ways of thinking have changed.”

But at another far-right rally in the northeastern Spanish city, attendees argued that the Spanish conquests were benign. “But now things are starting to twist,” said Ester Lopez, a 40-year-old office worker.

Paula Guerra, a Chilean anti-racism activist, said the celebrations should be replaced with “recognition of the damage caused by the horrors” committed by Spain in the Americas.

“It was a regime of terror. It was a barbaric regime, ”she declared.

Dora Turín, 35, who works in Spain’s audiovisual industry, said ahead of the parade that people should reflect positively on Spanish colonial rule.

“It was a contribution of cultures, in addition to our own,” she said. “It meant adding more knowledge and being able to blend cross-culturally and achieve what we are now.”

___

Barry Hatton reported from Lisbon, Portugal. Germán Martinez and Hernán Muñoz contributed from Barcelona, ​​Spain.


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Climate change is putting New Mexico’s ancient acequias to the test https://disturbmedia.com/climate-change-is-putting-new-mexicos-ancient-acequias-to-the-test/ https://disturbmedia.com/climate-change-is-putting-new-mexicos-ancient-acequias-to-the-test/#respond Tue, 12 Oct 2021 20:01:41 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/climate-change-is-putting-new-mexicos-ancient-acequias-to-the-test/ Acequia in Corrales, New Mexico. Photo: Marc De Simone / Alamy A narrow, winding ditch brings water from the Rio Grande into the orchard of Enrique Lamadrid’s north-central New Mexico property. The retired University of New Mexico professor and folklorist often marvels at the abundance of birds flitting through the trees on its shores. “We […]]]>

A narrow, winding ditch brings water from the Rio Grande into the orchard of Enrique Lamadrid’s north-central New Mexico property. The retired University of New Mexico professor and folklorist often marvels at the abundance of birds flitting through the trees on its shores. “We have great horned owls. We have several kinds of hawks, including little gavilanes, little kestrels, ”he says. “We have all kinds of songbirds. We have troglodytes. We have Bewick’s Wren singing a storm.

This small waterway is known as aequia, an ancient type of gravity-fed ditch found in northern New Mexico. These earthen channels carry melting snow and rain from the mountains to fields, orchards and gardens. The ribbons of emerald green vegetation that flourish in this way provide an oasis for a diversity of avian life, says Lamadrid, an avid ornithologist who has done extensive research on acequias. “We forget to give credit to the acequias, but the acequias widen and extend the riparian zone,” he says. “Where there are acequias, there are beautiful trees full of birds.

Acequias (pronounced ah-SEH-kee-ahs), has a long history of distributing water for flood irrigation dating back to the period of colonization in the 17th and 18th centuries. They have helped the people of New Mexico and other parts of the arid southwestern through times of fullness and scarcity. But the bad weather this summer dried up some acequias, raising concerns about whether these age-old symbols of resilience can continue to provide to communities as climate change causes deeper and more lasting water shortages.

The acequias come from a mixture of civilizations whose community culture still thrives in the region. Ditches have evolved over thousands of years in the Middle East. They spread to Spain during the North African Muslim occupation of the Iberian Peninsula in the 8th century. When the Spaniards arrived in the southwest, they used these irrigation techniques to build on similar canals that the Pueblo Indians relied on to grow corn, beans and squash.

An estimated 700 to 800 surviving New Mexico acequias pass through urban and rural communities, and their users are diverse. “Some are commercial farmers and others are lucky enough to have an acequia in their garden, but everyone benefits because they make it a very livable place,” says Lamadrid. In Santa Fe, the Randall Davey Audubon Center and Shrine draws water from the Acequia del Llano.

Old irrigation systems still operate much the same as they did centuries ago, on principles of fairness and cooperation. The word acequia, of Arabic origin, embodies not only the network of channels, but also a complex system of inherited cultural norms, shared responsibilities and democratic decision-making. “It’s a privilege to use water together,” says Lamadrid. “Aequia is about physical, spiritual and community values. “

State law recognizes acequias as political subdivisions and deals with related matters through the New Mexico Acequia Commission appointed by the governor. Acequia traditions include self-reliance practices and a distinct Spanish lexicon. Elected comisionados, or commissioners, manage the acequias. A mayordomo, or ditch manager, ensures the equitable distribution of water and the maintenance of the aequia. Women gamblers who hold water rights must help clean and repair the acequia madre each spring during the limpia, when people of all ages come together to cook, eat, and catch up with neighbors after the work is done. From this cherished main channel, water flows into the communities and is then allocated to the parciantes via smaller ditches that inundate the individual plots.

Since water from typically unlined acequias seeps through their beds, some critics consider them less effective than other crop watering methods. Drip irrigation, for example, uses flexible tubes to slowly deliver water directly to plants, keeping evaporation and runoff to a minimum. Supporters, however, present acequias as a viable alternative to deal with an increasingly hot climate. And science seems to back up these claims.

New Mexico State University studies show acequias offer multiple advantages For the environment. Not only do they enlarge and maintain riparian areas to increase bird and wildlife diversity, but infiltration of water from acequias replenishes shallow aquifers, feeding streams and rivers, says Alexander “Sam” Fernald, director of the University’s Water Resources Research Institute. Calling these irrigation systems inefficient “is to misrepresent the purpose of acequias,” he says. “Part of their function, historically and ideologically, is to maintain the balance between groundwater and surface water, so it’s actually the most efficient system to do that. “

__________

Not only do they enlarge and maintain riparian areas to increase bird and wildlife diversity, but infiltration of water from acequias replenishes shallow aquifers.

__________

Maintaining this balance will be especially important and difficult over the next several decades, during which scientists predict that New Mexico will get even hotter and drier. Higher temperatures earlier in the spring mean acequia users will have to adapt to the snowmelt they expect to arrive sooner, says John Fleck, director of the University of New Brunswick’s water resources program. Mexico. “If you use water downstream from a dam, where you can store spring runoff for use in the summer, you can correct that problem,” says Fleck. “But most of the acequias are not below the dams, so they are victims of this fundamental climate change.”

Still, acequias have proven to be resilient during times of severe drought and other external forces over the past 400 years, Fernald notes. The community-based nature of acequias can provide cohesion to help meet the challenges of climate change head-on, without advanced irrigation technologies or major infrastructure, he says.

The Pariantes are already adapting their approach. In the northern Albuquerque Valley, where Lamadrid lives and where acequias bring water from the Rio Grande, this summer’s drought forced the system to shut down three months earlier than usual. “Farmers put their fields to bed for the winter when they water for the last time in mid-October,” explains Lamadrid, a comisionado of the Alamos de los Gallegos Acequia association. “This year, they cut the cycles at the end of July. “

Monsoon rains provided temporary relief, allowing farmers and gardeners to water their fields and plots multiple times. “We’re still in the midst of a drought, but this year we’ve had very generous weather,” says Lamadrid, using the Spanish word for the seasonal rains that fell intermittently until September.

In East Pecos, state commission chairman Ralph Vigil is mayor of Acequia del Molino. An eighth generation farmer in the Pecos River Valley, he has started growing more drought tolerant crops which he sells to schools. He sees acequias as an integral part of the thriving habitat of birds and other creatures throughout the state: piece of wildlife in there.

Vigil and parciantes around New Mexico hope that Acequia communities will be able to adapt to a changing climate and preserve an age-old culture of water sharing based on querencia, a deep love of place that also involves the respect. “We have all been taught the querencia of ourselves, the community, the land and the place where we were raised,” says Vigil.

This legacy passed down from generation to generation, he says, can help keep acequias in a region they helped build centuries ago, and to which they still belong.


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Parallel mothers review: pregnancy plot unfolds in sharp political criticism https://disturbmedia.com/parallel-mothers-review-pregnancy-plot-unfolds-in-sharp-political-criticism/ https://disturbmedia.com/parallel-mothers-review-pregnancy-plot-unfolds-in-sharp-political-criticism/#respond Tue, 12 Oct 2021 17:28:48 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/parallel-mothers-review-pregnancy-plot-unfolds-in-sharp-political-criticism/ Pedro Almodóvar’s films have long focused on marginalized individuals – the excluded, the mistreated, the neglected. However, these stories were far from melancholy tragedies. Injecting a distinctly Spanish sense of humor (and lots of primary colors), Almodóvar empowers his protagonists by allowing them to assert themselves in a world that continually tries to relegate them […]]]>

Pedro Almodóvar’s films have long focused on marginalized individuals – the excluded, the mistreated, the neglected. However, these stories were far from melancholy tragedies. Injecting a distinctly Spanish sense of humor (and lots of primary colors), Almodóvar empowers his protagonists by allowing them to assert themselves in a world that continually tries to relegate them to the sidelines. With Parallel mothers, his 22nd feature film, the 72-year-old filmmaker continues to defend the oppressed, this time the victims of Spain’s national atrocities. While the film contains allusions to Almodóvar’s penchant for fast-paced comedy and cohesive color palettes, it conveys the grim sense of Spain’s cultural amnesia, culminating in an unexpectedly devastating emotional climax.

Located in 2016, Parallel mothers follows Janice (Penélope Cruz), a professional photographer in her forties who begins an adventure with forensic anthropologist Arturo (Israel Elejalde). Nine months after a particularly scorching encounter, she checks in to the maternity ward of a Madrid hospital, preparing to give birth and raising her child as a single mother. As fate willed her, her roommate is in a similar position, except that she is over 20 years younger than Janice: Ana (newcomer Milena Smit) is also without a partner, her only support during childbirth being her self-centered actress mother. (Aitana Sánchez-Gijón). While Janice is thrilled to have had the impromptu opportunity to become a mother, Ana is initially irritated by the circumstances that led to her pregnancy. Still, the two quickly bond, wandering the sterile hallways of the hospital in an effort to help their babies descend into the womb. Coincidentally, they both give birth to beautiful baby girls and exchange numbers to keep in touch as they embark on the journey of found motherhood.

While the film is presented as a straightforward examination of the peculiar dangers of parenthood – especially for women raising children outside the confines of conventional heterosexual nuclear families – Almodóvar instead uses multiple generations of matriarchs to bring light to families irreparably. broken by the cruelty of the not-so-distant Spanish fascist regime. The initial reason Janice approaches Arturo is to ask him if he could use his connections to organize the excavation of a mass grave in his hometown – one of the bodies buried being that of his great-grandfather.

He is just one of some 114,226 citizens who fell victim to the violent anti-Communist persecution of the Spanish Civil War, a fascist uprising that ultimately led to the nearly 40-year reign of Francisco Franco, from 1936 to his died 1975. Although a surprisingly large figure, the exact number of “missing” people (citizens who were forcibly abducted, tortured and murdered by paramilitary forces) is difficult to discern, mainly due to the many anonymous graves in which they were killed and buried. In some cases, the mausoleums were built to serve as a sick testament to extreme right-wing barbarism: one such site on the outskirts of Madrid, The Valley of the Fallen, contains the remains of 33,000 victims from this period. fascist domination. While repulsive in its scale of senseless slaughter, it is seen as a point of pride for conservatives, especially because Franco’s own body has been properly buried in this site, continuing to trample on the dignity of tens of thousands of people. innocent even in death. Although his body was ultimately removed by the Socialist government in 2019, which subsequently ordered earlier this year that The Valley of the Fallen begin an exhumation process, there remains a reluctance among much of the Spanish population. regarding the matter.

Many Almodóvar films highlight generational quarrels and contrasts. While Parallel mothers sticks to its motive of questioning intra-generational matrilineages, these characters also exist as an investigation into wider Spanish cultural attitudes. Janice stubbornly pursues the case of her great-grandfather’s exhumation, which Ana roughly dismisses as “obsessive” in nature. Furious at the ignorance of the younger generation, Janice explains that the war is not really over if its atrocities are not accounted for. Janice was raised by her grandmother, the daughter of her executed great-grandfather, who lived during the Civil War and Franco’s reign. Janice’s own mother was a “hippie” who came of age in the aftermath of Franco’s death, enjoying the creative renaissance that followed by pursuing artistic passions. If she hadn’t been raised by her grandmother, who remembered the war and lived most of her life under the dictatorship, Janice might not have become a strong advocate for the cause of his great-grandfather. Conversely, Ana was raised by an “apolitical” actress mother (often a dog whistle for indifference to injustice) and therefore never felt outrage for the past ills of her. his country.

In many ways, Parallel mothers is also an atonement on Almodóvar’s part for his own distancing from this period in Spanish history, especially as his own film career flourished after Franco’s decline. Although he was first expelled from film school after his institution was closed by the Franco regime in the early 1970s, he nevertheless rose to prominence during La Movida Madrileña, an artistic boom that relished the rise of democracy. Instead of addressing the decades of repression that plagued the nation, many artists chose to focus on long-awaited freedoms of expression (one of Almodóvar’s first films, Fuck … Fuck … Fuck me, Tim!, illustrates this frantic race to exhibit sexual provocations). Perhaps with recent government initiatives to finally deal with the victims of the civil war and Franco’s reign, Almodóvar finally felt it was vital that he address the long-standing lack of commitment. date from Spain to condemn its bloody past.

For a director who has never hesitated to portray on screen the most controversial taboos in society – incest, rape, suicide attempts, pedophilia and even golden showers – the fact that he took his entire career to explicitly incorporate the effects of the Spanish Civil War. The war in his work demonstrates the country’s relative inability to take them into account. Although Almodóvar has said that none of his own family fell victim to fascist brutality, his dedication to the continued plight of the families of those who perished gives the film an almost unusual sense of lightness and sorrow. . While this is certainly a change in the filmmaker’s melodramatic and extravagant sensibility (although this has changed considerably since his semi-autobiographical 2019 film Pain and Glory, followed by the deconstructive short film Human voice), he never feels mismanaged in his take, always remaining responsive even incorporating shocking twists and revelations. Particularly associated with Cruz’s eliminatory performance of a woman whose life endures the legacy left by the trauma of her family’s unresolved past, Parallel mothers is a deeply political example of what is lost when we forget and what is achieved when we fight to remember.

Director: Pedro Almodovar
Writers: Pedro Almodovar
Stars: Penélope Cruz, Milena Smit, Israel Elejalde, Rossy de Palma, Aitana Sánchez-Gijón
Release date: December 24, 2021 (Sony Pictures Classics)


Natalia Keogan is a freelance screenwriter based in Queens, New York. His work has been featured in Paste Magazine, Blood Knife Magazine, and Filmmaker Magazine, among others. Find her on Twitter @nataliakeogan


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Algerian whistleblower jailed after expulsion from Spain | Corruption News https://disturbmedia.com/algerian-whistleblower-jailed-after-expulsion-from-spain-corruption-news/ https://disturbmedia.com/algerian-whistleblower-jailed-after-expulsion-from-spain-corruption-news/#respond Tue, 12 Oct 2021 16:18:45 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/algerian-whistleblower-jailed-after-expulsion-from-spain-corruption-news/ Madrid, Spain – After joining the Algerian border patrol forces in 2013, former gendarme Mohamed Abdellah began to suspect that something was wrong. Abdellah was an air supervisor on the border patrol helicopters and as such was responsible for the operation of surveillance cameras and surveillance activities across the border between Algeria and Tunisia. During […]]]>

Madrid, Spain – After joining the Algerian border patrol forces in 2013, former gendarme Mohamed Abdellah began to suspect that something was wrong.

Abdellah was an air supervisor on the border patrol helicopters and as such was responsible for the operation of surveillance cameras and surveillance activities across the border between Algeria and Tunisia.

During his tenure as air supervisor, Abdellah claims to have faced widespread corruption, bribes, fraudulent behavior and the smuggling of arms and gasoline across the border, encouraged by senior officers. rank of the Algerian gendarmerie.

Ultimately Abdellah chose to sound the alarm and report what he witnessed to his superiors, but his efforts were wasted.

Today, Abdellah finds himself behind bars in an Algerian detention center in the city of Kolea. He is awaiting his military trial following his sudden extradition from Spain earlier this year, where he requested political asylum.

Abdallah’s case is fraught with complexities, contrasting allegations and takes place in a charged political atmosphere.

His wife told Al Jazeera that by raising the issue with his superiors, he was given two simple choices: either close his eyes and ignore what he saw, or choose to comply and engage in. corruption among the forces.

Instead, Abdellah turned to anti-corruption activists in Algeria and abroad hoping to find support, and leaked information and evidence he had compiled. Sources close to Abdallah told Al Jazeera that he quickly began to receive threats and fear for the safety of his family.

Abdellah was accused of having “undermined public order, security and the stability of the State” [Photo supplied to Al Jazeera]

In November 2018, Abdellah fled to Spain with his wife and child, leaving his post in the Algerian National Gendarmerie. He settled in Alicante, in eastern Spain, and applied for political asylum in March 2019.

In exile, Abdellah intensified his activism and became more committed to exposing and denouncing the corruption he encountered in the armed forces. He began to denounce the army and the government through his Youtube and Facebook profiles and gained a substantial audience, gathering more than 265,000 subscribers.

This was not well received by the Algerian authorities who allegedly pronounced him in May 2019 a military indictment for “revealing national defense secrets … [and] insult the President of the Republic ”, according to documents consulted by Al Jazeera.

A year later, an international arrest warrant was issued against Abdellah – among three other prominent critics of the government – on charges of “terrorism”.

The warrant accused Abdellah of “undermining public order, security and the stability of the state,” as well as claiming that he was involved in projects aimed at exploiting the Algerian anti-government movement Hirak and remove it from its “peaceful character”.

From exile to “political expulsion”

During his years in Spain, Abdellah said he suffered regular intimidation and threats from people he claimed to be agents of the Algerian government.

In June 2020, he filed a report with the Spanish police where he denounced having been followed and threatened, being told: “You will pay a high price for what you said. We know that you have applied for asylum in Spain and we will make sure that you do not get it, ”according to the police report seen by Al Jazeera.

On August 3, 2020, it broadcast a live video on Facebook the dissemination of such a case of suspected intimidation. The video has over four million views.

His wife also said she has been followed on numerous occasions, with people showing up at her children’s school, Spanish lessons and at the entrance to their home. She filed a separate police report in August 2020 asking to be relocated for their protection.

On August 12 of this year, while on his way to an appointment to renew his temporary residence permit, Abdellah was informed that his request for political asylum had been rejected and that he was taken into custody and quickly transferred to a foreign internment center in Barcelona.

The Spanish police arrest warrant said Abdallah posed a “significant risk to national security” and claimed he had been in regular contact and received funds from the prominent Algerian dissident. Mohamed Larbi Zitout, one of the leading figures of the anti-government movement Rachad.

On August 21, Abdellah was extradited to Algeria, where he is currently in detention – reportedly held in solitary confinement in a three-story cell underground. His family said his state-appointed lawyers withdrew from the case.

“The Algerian state hopes that by using the” terrorism “card, it can justify the expulsion of Abdallah and other activists from a” democratic “state like Spain, where there should have been concerns as to the potential treatment of Abdallah at the hands of the authorities upon dismissal. in Algeria ”, declared Yasmina Allouche, Algerian journalist and political researcher.

‘Very unusual’

Activists have also raised concerns over Spain’s handling of Abdallah’s extradition, saying he was denied legal protections as a political asylum seeker. In addition, his legal team maintains that the case was handled in a questionable manner and influenced by extra-legal interests.

“We believe Abdallah’s case is clearly a political expulsion,” a representative of his Spanish legal team, who was hired by his family, told Al Jazeera.

“Technically, it is not an extradition but an expulsion, that is to say it goes through the administrative aspect of the law, which does not have the same legal guarantees as the criminal, ”said the lawyer, who wished to remain anonymous.

The legal team questioned the Spanish authorities’ interpretation of international refugee law and highlighted the fact that Abdallah was not offered a period of voluntary departure, nor had the opportunity to invoke his right of non-return as a political refugee, which his legal representatives described as “highly unusual”.

“Abdellah has no criminal record in Spain and the police report is vague and very generic. It is obvious that the expulsion is based on what Algeria said, ”added its legal representative.

Al Jazeera has contacted Algerian and Spanish authorities for comment, but no response has been received.

Algerian authoritarianism

Doubts have also been cast on the validity of the accusations leveled by the Algerian state against political activists and members of opposition groups, along with Amnesty International. label them “False accusations of terrorism” used to limit dissent.

“There is clearly an intention of the Algerian authorities to cover up their mismanagement of state affairs. What is also worrying is that as the elections approach, we are entering this environment where any opposition, no matter how peaceful, would be considered a disturbance of public order, ”said Zine Ghebouli, an Algerian political analyst.

The Algerian government has come under heavy criticism in recent years for its response to opposition movements such as Hirak and Rachad. The latter has been classified as a terrorist organization by the government in May of this year.

As the Hirak’s momentum intensified, the government’s crackdown on protesters also accelerated. This resulted in the arrest and repression of hundreds of Hirak operatives and government critics, the UN human rights office condemning the “The deterioration of the human rights situation… and the continuing and growing repression against members of the pro-democracy Hirak movement”.

“Protesters, journalists, activists and ordinary citizens have been arbitrarily arrested and unfairly convicted for peacefully exercising their right to freedom of expression,” Hassina Oussedik, head of Amnesty in Algeria, told Al Jazeera.

“This year, authorities have used vague interpretations of the criminal code and vague terrorism-related charges to prosecute these individuals. “

Questions have also been raised about the government’s decision to classify Rachad as a terrorist group.

“I don’t see any particular reason to classify them as a terrorist organization, but in Algeria there is a consensus that anyone associated with the Rachad movement will be arrested, and if he is abroad he will be extradited,” he said. declared Ghebouli. .

Division within

However, the Rachad movement became more and more divided among the Algerian opposition.

The group is primarily led by leading Islamists and concerns have arisen over the group’s ties to the Islamic Salvation Front (FIS), a former political party heavily involved in Algeria’s turbulent Black Decade, which has made around 200,000. dead.

“The Islamist Rachad has been accused of being another version of the FIS with possible violent tendencies, which few Algerians have the stomach for after the Black Decade. However, these feelings are being manipulated by the regime to deter dissent, ”Allouche said.

Nonetheless, Abdallah’s close relationship with Rachad’s leadership gave the government an excuse to persecute, extradite and detain him.

“It’s a very blurry line at this point. The whole situation is very ambiguous as we don’t have access to everyone’s complete files. It is difficult to assess whether all those arrested are really activists or militants. terrorists. However, there are victims of this rhetoric of security, and when it comes to militants abroad, the case of Mohamed Abdellah serves as an example. is why he was extradited to Algeria, ”Ghebouli said.

Despite the presence of a strong opposition movement such as the Hirak and public dissidents like Abdellah, the outlook remains bleak for those in Algeria who denounce the government.

“The Algerian authorities will only change their behavior when they want and have an interest in doing so – and so far they are not. So at least until the elections, we will see the same behavior, people who protest will be thrown in jail, ”said Ghebouli.


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The Spanish PPAs and the reduction in remuneration under the RDL 17/2021 – pv magazine International https://disturbmedia.com/the-spanish-ppas-and-the-reduction-in-remuneration-under-the-rdl-17-2021-pv-magazine-international/ https://disturbmedia.com/the-spanish-ppas-and-the-reduction-in-remuneration-under-the-rdl-17-2021-pv-magazine-international/#respond Tue, 12 Oct 2021 07:00:39 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/the-spanish-ppas-and-the-reduction-in-remuneration-under-the-rdl-17-2021-pv-magazine-international/ The measures were adopted by decree and after only a few days were concretized by an additional explanation (aclaración) (Real Decreto-ley 17/2021 of 14.09.21, together with the ministerial announcement “Respuesta al operador del sistema sobre la aplicación del RDL 17/21 ”from the Ministry of the Environment of 21.09.21). On the one hand, the RDL 17/2021 […]]]>

The measures were adopted by decree and after only a few days were concretized by an additional explanation (aclaración) (Real Decreto-ley 17/2021 of 14.09.21, together with the ministerial announcement “Respuesta al operador del sistema sobre la aplicación del RDL 17/21 ”from the Ministry of the Environment of 21.09.21).

On the one hand, the RDL 17/2021 package of measures includes tax advantages and, on the other hand, a reduction in remuneration (“clawback”) until the end of March 2022, which must be paid to the Spanish TSO by the owner of renewable energy plants.

Overall, the economic losses from the reduction outweigh the positive effects of the tax break, so that in extreme circumstances, project owners could be forced to close factories in individual cases to limit losses incurred.

Personal scope of RDL 17/2021

The temporary reduction particularly affects owners of renewable energy plants with a capacity greater than 10 MW, whose volumes of energy produced are traded on the spot market and thus, with other types of plants, benefit “extraordinarily” of the current sharp rise in electricity prices.

Thus, it is assumed for regulatory purposes that the turnover to be reduced has “internalized” or “indexed”, in a way, the increase caused mainly by the price of gas (as one of the main factors in the formation of gas). price of electricity).

Thus, investments for which the proceeds of the sale are not “indexed” in whole or in part are excluded from the reduction.

This primarily concerns renewable energy installations which have concluded physical and bilateral electricity supply contracts (physical PPAs) at fixed prices, provided that these PPAs have not been concluded between affiliated companies and before the 16th September 2021.

Secondly, “financial PPAs” are also exempt from the reduction, provided that they were concluded in whole or in part with non-indexed hedging transactions (hedging) during the period of validity of RDL 17/2021, not with related companies and before September 16. , 2021.

This therefore applies to financial PPAs with a mixed pricing mechanism (e.g. cap-floor pricing) and to financial PPAs relating to several assets of an owner (asset pool), but only with regard to the part of the income that is priced at a fixed price. and non-indexed base. The unsecured “net income share” is then subject to a pro rata reduction.

Finally, renewable energy installations which benefit either from a special feed-in tariff subsidized by the State or from a remuneration scheme based on calls for tenders are also exempt from the reduction.

With respect to these aforementioned exemptions, the exact details have yet to be finalized. It is not unlikely that RDL 17/2021 will be amended in the coming weeks until it is confirmed or repealed by Parliament.

In particular, setting the deadline for PPAs as a condition for exemption from reduction (PPA conclusion before September 16, 2021) is strongly debated and attacked in the market. This regulation is in direct contradiction with the idea of ​​the government to intensively promote the use of long-term electricity supply contracts also in the future.

In all cases, however, the plant owners concerned are required to assess the economic impact of RDL 17/2021 in terms of contractually responsible management in legal terms, either because they already manage applicable PPAs in their portfolio, or because they are about to enter into an APA.

Contractual view

From the point of view of contract law, the effects of recovery according to RDL 17/2021 should be considered as events which could, in extreme cases, open the possibility for the owner of the renewable energy plant and the party contracting party to a PPA to adjust the contract. In the following, this particular case will be briefly described and finally summarized in the form of concise practical advice:

  1. a) Applicable law

First of all, when examining contractual clauses, it is necessary to clarify which law is applicable to the contract for the supply of electricity. Even though contractual adjustments are regularly regulated in detail in the PPA, these clauses still apply only in the context and on the basis of the contract law chosen by the contracting parties. On PPAs with reference to Spain, this usually means the application of Spanish law. However, foreign legal systems must also be taken into account, provided that a corresponding choice of law has been made.

  1. b) Difficulties / Change of law in Spanish law

Hardship ”refers to events which make the performance obligations of the parties agreed in the contract more difficult than what is tolerable to the detriment of a single party to the contract, but not impossible. They thus constitute an exception to the principle of the obligation to perform the contract (“pacta sunt servanda”). They apply regularly if the contractual situation initially observed by the contracting parties outside the sphere of responsibility of the parties involved unforeseen and serious changes such that compliance with the contract would result in undue hardship for one of the parties to the contract. .

While in German law, for example, the exception to the general performance obligation described above is now explicitly governed by § 313 BGB (“Störung der Geschäftsgrundlage”), there is no statutory regulation correspondent in Spain. As an unwritten principle of a “change in the contractual situation” (“rebus sic stantibus”), the exception is nevertheless recognized in Spanish doctrine and case law. Local case law on the application of hardship clauses was last consolidated in the context of the global financial crisis to resolve extreme distortions of contractual symmetry. As in German law, this is based on the hypothetical will of the contracting parties at the time of the conclusion of the contract and thus also defines the specific standard of reasonableness in each case.

With regard to a contract for the supply of electricity in Spain, regularly agreed so-called “change of law” clauses must be qualified as a sub-category of a hardship clause. They are also based on unforeseen events outside the risk sphere of the contracting parties, which may arise in particular as a result of legal interventions, such as regulatory changes.

The reduction in remuneration due to RDL 17/2021 therefore meets the requirements of a hardship clause in any case on the merits. The decisive factor then is that the economic burdens and effects that the reduction in tariffs means for an installation in a specific case exceed the threshold of unreasonableness. As each factory has different initial economic parameters, the particularities of each factory must be taken into account. Regarding the type of PPA, for example, the contracts for securing the financing of factories (upstream PPA), with their specific banking requirements, should be differentiated according to their financial structure.

For the future, the RDL, which has now entered into force, means in particular a shift in the “requirement of unpredictability” for the application of the “change of law” clause. This should be taken into account in particular when reformulating PPAs.

Process view

While the reduction in compensation under RDL 17/2021 will result in significant losses for most renewable power plants, only a few are likely to exceed the unreasonable threshold of a typical hardship clause in a PPA. .

The main objective is to adjust the contract before it is terminated. In this regard, it is for the court (Spanish) to adapt the contract at its own discretion. Those who have entered into an arbitration agreement in the interim power supply contract may consider themselves lucky, as this allows the parties to themselves select the appropriate arbitrators taking into account the judicial discretion to be exercised.

The significantly shorter duration of arbitration proceedings compared to state court proceedings of several years is also an advantage which should not be underestimated in the case of disputes over electricity tariffs. In the context of the latest decisions of the Court of Justice of the EU, the competent arbitral tribunals must ensure that this adjustment is proportionate and in any event within the limits of competition law.

Practical advice:

For existing PPAs with indexed price clauses

Review existing contracts and assess their economic impact. If your PPA is affected by the recovery to such an extent that you would be economically compelled to (temporarily) shut down the plant, notify your contractual partners as well as investors and financial institutions in advance of this. possible step. In the event that the co-contracting party is considering legal action in the event of closure, try to find an amicable solution to the conflict upstream, ideally within the framework of commercial mediation (ADR). If this does not succeed, there remains the possibility of an adjustment of the contract by the (arbitral) court seised.

For PPAs to be negotiated

Use suitable hardship clauses, adapting them to your specific contractual situation and the chosen law, and in particular by providing for cases of contract regularization by court or by expert. Appropriate clauses can be found on the CCI website. Note that the now promulgated RDL has now moved the requirements relating to the unpredictability of state pay cuts.

The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of pv magazine.

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Ardian in first position in the Spanish telecom fiber market with the purchase of Adamo https://disturbmedia.com/ardian-in-first-position-in-the-spanish-telecom-fiber-market-with-the-purchase-of-adamo/ https://disturbmedia.com/ardian-in-first-position-in-the-spanish-telecom-fiber-market-with-the-purchase-of-adamo/#respond Mon, 11 Oct 2021 21:29:06 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/ardian-in-first-position-in-the-spanish-telecom-fiber-market-with-the-purchase-of-adamo/ Monday, Ardian, the (mostly) employee-owned private equity investment firm with over $ 114 billion in client assets under management, has announced its first-ever transaction targeting the telecommunications fiber market in Spain. Ardian Infrastructure to Acquire 100% of Spain’s Fastest Growing Fiber-to-the-Home (FTTH) Provider, Barcelona Adamo, from the Swedish real estate investor EQT Group. The price […]]]>

Monday, Ardian, the (mostly) employee-owned private equity investment firm with over $ 114 billion in client assets under management, has announced its first-ever transaction targeting the telecommunications fiber market in Spain. Ardian Infrastructure to Acquire 100% of Spain’s Fastest Growing Fiber-to-the-Home (FTTH) Provider, Barcelona Adamo, from the Swedish real estate investor EQT Group. The price and other terms of the deal were not made public.

Adamo, which was the first telecommunications provider in Spain to offer a service with speeds of up to 1 Gb / s, currently provides broadband internet coverage to around 1.8 million homes, serving around 250,000 individual subscribers. in 27 provinces of Spain. In the years to come, the company hopes to reach 3.2 million homes, expanding its backbone network to 11,000 km in the coming years, primarily expanding into rural areas with virtually no broadband internet access. According to Ardian, he plans to support Adamo’s goals through organic expansion of his existing network as well as possible network acquisitions.

“We are very happy to be able to announce our first investment in the telecommunications sector in Spain”, said Juan Angoitia, co-head of Ardian Infrastructure in Europe. “The Spanish market remains very attractive for us. Our goal will now be to work with the Adamo team to create value for the company and all its stakeholders, while helping to solve the serious problems facing rural areas in Spain and boosting their economic development and social.

“We are proud to integrate a partner like Ardian who brings a great experience in the sector, a deep knowledge of the market and a great sensitivity towards our contribution to society,” said the CEO of Adamo. Martin czermin. “Their support comes at a key time in order to continue to stimulate Adamo’s growth both organically and inorganically. “

Adamo’s acquisition agreement adds to a priority weighting for telecommunications at Ardian Infrastructure, whose portfolio already includes a 30.2% controlling stake in INWIT, the leading tour operator in Italy, and a 26% stake in sheep, one of the largest utilities in Germany and a leading provider of telecommunications services.

EQT initially acquired a controlling stake in Adamo in 2017, marking the company’s first private equity investment in Spain, and now its second successful exit. Since then, notes EQT, Adamo has grown its fiber network exponentially, going from 100,000 households served in the Catalonia region to 1.8 million households on a national footprint. During the same period, Adamo moved from a pure retail model to an open access platform, securing wholesale contracts with four out of five national operators in the Spanish market, as well as with more of 160 local operators.


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