Spanish province – Disturb Media http://disturbmedia.com/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 23:03:58 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://disturbmedia.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-6-120x120.png Spanish province – Disturb Media http://disturbmedia.com/ 32 32 Camino pilgrims help keep rural Spanish towns alive https://disturbmedia.com/camino-pilgrims-help-keep-rural-spanish-towns-alive/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 23:03:58 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/camino-pilgrims-help-keep-rural-spanish-towns-alive/ By Giovanna Dell’Orto | Associated Press TERRADILLOS DE LOS TEMPLARIOS, Spain – Amidst Spain’s vast grain fields, a medieval church stands guard over the handful of adobe houses where around 50 people live – and twice as many travelers along the Camino de Santiago spend the night this summer. Terradillos de los Templarios, and dozens […]]]>

By Giovanna Dell’Orto | Associated Press

TERRADILLOS DE LOS TEMPLARIOS, Spain – Amidst Spain’s vast grain fields, a medieval church stands guard over the handful of adobe houses where around 50 people live – and twice as many travelers along the Camino de Santiago spend the night this summer.

Terradillos de los Templarios, and dozens of similar villages, were built to accommodate medieval pilgrims traveling the 800 kilometer route through Spain to the tomb of the Apostle James in Santiago de Compostela. Today’s Camino travelers save them from extinction.

“It’s village life,” said Nuria Quintana, who runs one of Terradillos’ two pilgrimage hostels. “In winter, when no pilgrims pass, you can walk through the village 200 times without seeing anyone.”

A pilgrim walks along an ancient street during a stage of the “Camino de Santiago” or Way of Saint James in Cirauqui, northern Spain, Tuesday, May 31, 2022. Alvaro Barrientos/Associated Press

In this hamlet named after a medieval chivalric order founded to protect pilgrims, and all along the route, the return of travelers – after the disruptions linked to the pandemic – contributes to restoring the means of subsistence and the vitality of villages which steadily lost jobs, people, and even their social fabric.

“If it wasn’t for the Camino, there wouldn’t even be a cafe open. And the bar is where people meet,” said Raúl Castillo, an officer with the Guardia Civil, the law enforcement agency that patrols Spanish roads and villages. He spent 14 years in Sahagún, 13 kilometers away, from where agents cover 49 hamlets.

“The villages next door, off the Camino – they make you cry. The houses are falling, the grass is growing on the sidewalks up to here,” he added, pointing to a table.

From the mountains of the Pyrenees on the border with France, across hundreds of miles of sun-roasted Spanish plains to the mist-covered hills of Galicia rolling towards the Atlantic Ocean, towns of farmers and ranchers once booming have begun to hemorrhage in recent decades.

Mechanization greatly reduced the need for farm laborers. As young people moved away, shops and cafes closed.

Often the same goes for large churches full of priceless works of art – the legacy of medieval and Renaissance artists brought by prosperous bourgeois, said Julia Pavón, a historian at the University of Navarre in Pamplona. , the first big city of the Camino.

But starting in the 1990s, the Camino regained international popularity, with tens of thousands of visitors walking and cycling each spring, summer and fall. After a severe dip amid the pandemic in 2020 and the start of a recovery with mainly Spanish pilgrims in 2021, 2022 looks like the “last” year, as Quintana put it, with over 25,000 visitors just in May on the most traditional route, the “French way”.

With daily visitors outnumbering locals in the smaller hamlets, the impact is enormous.

“Now all that works (in town) is the hospitality industry,” said Óscar Tardajos, who was born on a farm along the Camino. For 33 years he ran a hotel and restaurant in Castrojeriz, a stone-built hillside village that was a center of the wool trade centuries ago when its half-dozen churches were destroyed. built.

The Camino helps create jobs and maintain cultural heritage, said Melchor Fernández, professor of economics at the University of Santiago de Compostela. “It has curbed depopulation”, which is 30% higher in Galician villages off the Camino.

While most pilgrims only spend around 50 euros (dollars) a day, it’s still local.

“The bread in the Pilgrim’s sandwich is not Bimbo,” Fernández said, referring to the multinational. “It’s from the bakery next door.”

In Cirauqui, a hilltop village in Navarre, the only bakery survived because dozens of pilgrims stop there daily, baker Conchi Sagardía said while serving a pastry and juice to a pilgrim from Florida.

Besides the pilgrims, the main customers of these shops are the older inhabitants of the villages, where few young adults live.

“In the summer, grannies sit along the Camino to watch the pilgrims go by,” said Lourdes González, a Paraguayan who has owned the Redecilla del Camino cafe for 10 years. Its only street is the Camino.

His concern — shared widely along the route — is to keep that unique pilgrim spirit alive even as the popularity of the Camino leads to greater commercialization.

In more and more cases, the iconic yellow arrows lead to bars or foot massage businesses instead of the Camino. On a recent morning in the town of Tardajos, Esteban Velasco, a retired shepherd, stood at a crossroads pointing out the correct route to pilgrims.

“The Camino would have no reason to exist without the pilgrimage,” said Jesús Aguirre, president of the Association of Friends of the Camino de Santiago in the province of Burgos. “You can do it for different reasons, but you keep soaking up something else.”

A sign indicating the distance to Santiago displayed for pilgrims during a stage of the ‘Camino de Santiago’ or Way of St. James, in Rabe de la Calzada, northern Spain, on Wednesday June 1 2022. Alvaro Barrientos/Associated Press

For many, it is a spiritual or religious quest. The push to keep churches open to pilgrims also revitalized parishes, rapidly secularizing Spain.

The 900-year-old Church of Santa María in Los Arcos is one of the most magnificent of the Camino villages, with a soaring bell tower and an intricately carved altarpiece. Pilgrims often double the number of those attending weekday Masses, Reverend Andrés Lacarra said.

In Hontanas, a group of stone houses that suddenly appear in a dip after a trek across the vast plains of Castile, there is only Sunday mass, as is often the case when a priest covers several parishes.

But on a recent Wednesday evening, the church bells rang with delight – Reverend Jihwan Cho, a priest from Toronto on his second pilgrimage, was about to celebrate the Eucharist.
“The fact that I was able to celebrate Mass…it made me really happy,” he said.

International pilgrims like him are making some cities increasingly cosmopolitan.

In Sahagún, the English teacher asks Nuria Quintana’s daughter and her classmates to follow the pilgrims and practice their language.

In the small Calzadilla de la Cueza, “people have become much more sociable”, said César Acero.

Villagers called him ‘crazy’ when in 1990 he opened the inn and restaurant where, on a recent afternoon, two farmers on tractors had a quick coffee alongside a group of cyclists from the Netherlands to Santiago.

“Now you see people I never saw when I was little, of all nationalities,” said Loly Valcárcel, owner of a pizzeria in Sarria. It is one of the busiest towns on the Camino, as the distance required to obtain a “certificate” of completion in Santiago is exceeded.

Far fewer pilgrims take the old Roman road through Calzadilla de los Hermanillos, where as a child Gemma Herreros helped feed the sheep her family raised for generations.

She runs a bed and breakfast with her Cuban husband, a former pilgrim, near the city’s open-air museum retracing the history of the ancient route. Herreros hopes the village will continue to thrive – but without entirely losing the “absolute freedom and solidarity” of its childhood.

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Spain and Germany battle to contain wildfires amid heatwave https://disturbmedia.com/spain-and-germany-battle-to-contain-wildfires-amid-heatwave/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 14:29:41 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/spain-and-germany-battle-to-contain-wildfires-amid-heatwave/ BARCELONA, Spain (AP) — Firefighters in Spain and Germany struggled to contain wildfires on Sunday amid an unusual heat wave in Western Europe for this time of year. The worst damage in Spain occurred in the northwestern province of Zamora, where more than 25,000 hectares (61,000 acres) were consumed, regional authorities said, while German officials […]]]>

BARCELONA, Spain (AP) — Firefighters in Spain and Germany struggled to contain wildfires on Sunday amid an unusual heat wave in Western Europe for this time of year.

The worst damage in Spain occurred in the northwestern province of Zamora, where more than 25,000 hectares (61,000 acres) were consumed, regional authorities said, while German officials said residents of three villages near Berlin had been ordered to leave their homes due to an approach. Sunday forest fire.

Spanish authorities said after three days of high temperatures, strong winds and low humidity, some respite came with a drop in temperatures on Sunday morning. This allowed around 650 firefighters supported by water-dropping planes to establish a perimeter around the blaze that broke out in the Sierra de la Culebra de Zamora. Authorities have warned there is still a danger that unfavorable climate change could reignite the blaze that prompted the evacuation of 18 villages.

READ MORE: Lava from La Palma volcano in Spain forces 800 people to evacuate

Spain is on high alert for an outbreak of intense wildfires as the country swelters in record temperatures in many parts of the country in June. Experts link the abnormally hot period for Europe to climate change. Thermometers topped 40C (104F) in many Spanish cities throughout the week – temperatures usually expected in August.

A lack of precipitation this year combined with gusty winds have created the conditions for the fires.

Authorities said winds of up to 70 km/h (43 mph) that changed course erratically, combined with temperatures close to 40C, made it very difficult for crews.

“The fire was able to cross a reservoir about 500 meters wide and reach the other side, to give you an idea of ​​the difficulties we faced,” said Juan Suárez-Quiñones, an official in the Castilla region. y León, on Spanish public television TVE.

READ MORE: Toxic gases and new rivers of molten lava endanger the Spanish island

The Zamora fire was sparked by a strike from an electrical storm on Wednesday, authorities said. The spreading fire caused the high-speed train service between Madrid and northwestern Spain to be cut off on Saturday. He was reinstated on Sunday morning.

Military firefighting units have been deployed in Zamora, Navarra and Lleida.

No fatalities were reported, but the flames reached the outskirts of some villages in Zamora and Navarre. Videos shot by passengers in cars showed flames licking the sides of the roads. In other villages, residents watched in despair as black plumes rose from nearby hills.

In north-central Navarre, authorities have evacuated about 15 small villages as a precaution, as high temperatures in the region are not expected to drop until Wednesday.

They also asked farmers to stop using heavy machinery that could unintentionally start a fire.

“The situation remains delicate. We have several active fires due to extremely high temperatures and high winds,” Navarre Regional Vice President Javier Remírez told TVE.

Remírez said some villages had seen damaged buildings on their outskirts.

Some wild animals had to be evacuated from an animal park in Navarre and taken to an arena for safekeeping, authorities said.

READ MORE: German Chancellor Scholz says G-7 will support Ukraine ‘as long as necessary’

Forest fires were also active in three parts of northeastern Catalonia: in Lleida, Tarragona and in a natural park in Garaf, just south of Barcelona.

Firefighters said 2,700 hectares (6,600 acres) had been burned in Lleida. They added that they had responded to more than 200 different wildfires in Catalonia alone over the past week.

In Germany, high winds fanned the blaze about 50 kilometers (31 miles) southwest of Berlin, prompting authorities to declare an emergency on Saturday.

Villagers from Frohnsdorf, Tiefenbrunnen and Klausdorf were told to take refuge immediately in a community center in the nearby town of Treuenbrietzen.

“This is not a drill,” city officials tweeted.

Germany has experienced numerous forest fires in recent days after a period of intense heat and little rain.

The country’s national weather agency said the mercury rose above 38C (100.4F) at a measuring station in the east on Sunday.

The thunderstorms were expected to bring cooler weather from the west starting in the evening.

Frank Jordans contributed to this report from Berlin.

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Good news: Miracle drug eradicates rectal cancer and universal charger for electronics https://disturbmedia.com/good-news-miracle-drug-eradicates-rectal-cancer-and-universal-charger-for-electronics/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 18:56:38 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/good-news-miracle-drug-eradicates-rectal-cancer-and-universal-charger-for-electronics/ Welcome to another round of good news, our weekly selection of news to send you off to the weekend with a smile. Here’s this week’s positive news: A wonder drug that eradicated cancer in every patient in the trial. The EU has seen a record drop in carbon emissions. A new EU rule will see […]]]>

Welcome to another round of good news, our weekly selection of news to send you off to the weekend with a smile.

Here’s this week’s positive news:

  1. A wonder drug that eradicated cancer in every patient in the trial.
  2. The EU has seen a record drop in carbon emissions.
  3. A new EU rule will see universal chargers used for all phones, tablets and laptops.
  4. New research shows that music with a groove is good for brain function.
  5. The number of an endangered rhino is increasing.
  6. A new law in Spain aims to eliminate food waste.

Watch the video above to learn more about each story, or read below.

Here’s this week’s positive news:

1. A miracle drug trial that eradicated cancer in every patient.

A major breakthrough in cancer treatment may be imminent, after more than a dozen US rectal cancer patients saw their tumors disappear after taking a new drug.

The patients were part of a small clinical trial led by researchers at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York, who gave them an experimental drug called dostarlimab.

Participants received a dose of dostarlimab every three weeks for six months, and the idea was that they would also have to undergo standard treatments of chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery after the immunotherapy treatment.

But to their surprise, the researchers found that in each case the cancer was wiped out with the experimental treatment alone.

The trial was hailed as a first in cancer treatment.

One of the paper’s authors, Dr. Luis Diaz Jr of Memorial Sloan Kettering, told the New York Times that he was unaware of any other study in which treatment completely cleared the cancer in every patient.

2. The EU has seen a record drop in carbon emissions

Greenhouse gas emissions in the bloc are at their lowest level since records began in the 1990s, according to the latest official data released today by the European Environment Agency.

The overall reduction in emissions between 1990 and 2020 was 34%, or 1.94 billion tonnes of greenhouse gases. This is equivalent to driving 1.94 billion times around the earth in a mid-size car.

Almost all EU member states had lower emissions than in 1990, but the UK, which was still part of the bloc in 2020, and Germany deserve special mention, as they accounted for 47% of the reduction total net income over the past 30 years.

3. A new EU rule will see universal chargers used for all phones, tablets and laptops.

Thanks to a recent agreement, that nest of cables in your suitcase could soon be reduced to a single charger. European officials have agreed a deal to impose a single port standard for smartphones, tablets and laptops sold in the bloc.

It’s a win-win for reducing both frustration and e-waste, e-waste, which is the fastest growing source of waste in the developed world.

EU member states and MEPs believe that a standard USB-C port for all devices will have a major environmental benefit.

The USB-C rule will also cover digital cameras, headphones, headphones, portable speakers and e-readers, MPs said.

For most devices, the requirement to charge via a USB-C port will come into effect from the end of 2024, while laptops will have more time.

Resistance to the idea has mostly come from Apple, which is most affected by the move. The company says a uniform charger would stifle innovation.

“From now on, it is mandatory if a company wishes to benefit from the largest digital market in the free world (…), it will have to apply our rules”, declared Thierry Breton, European commissioner in charge of the internal market.

The European Commission entered into a voluntary agreement with the device industry in 2009, which led to a major reduction in cables, but then Apple launched its own Lightning connector. Once this new law is officially ratified by the European Parliament and between EU member states, they will have no choice.

“In two years, if Apple wants to market its products, sell its products in our internal market, they must follow our rules and their respective devices must be USB-C,” said Alex Agius Saliba, Member of the European Parliament.

4. New research shows that music with a groove is good for brain function

We knew it was good for the body, but researchers have found that rhythm is also good for the brain.

The discovery, by researchers at the University of Tsukuba in Japan, is primarily about music, specifically music with a groove – a rhythm that makes you want to dance.

The study examines how this type of music elicits feelings of pleasure and excitement in people, and how it stimulates the prefrontal cortex to improve executive brain function, cognitive skills that include working memory, flexible thinking and self-control.

Benefits were only apparent in participants who said the music elicited a strong feeling of groove. In other words, it’s a very individual response and only works on those who react to the rhythm of the music. For some, their prefrontal cortex will respond to salsa, and for others, to techno.

5. The number of an endangered rhino is on the rise

Assam, the Indian province best known for its tea plantations, is experiencing a rhinoceros baby boom.

Assam is home to 70% of the world’s one-horned rhino population and conducts a rhino census every two years. Since the last count, rhino numbers have increased by 274 – partly due to the peace and quiet during the pandemic, when many protected areas were closed to visitors.

For a species that was once perilously close to extinction, numbering fewer than 100 individuals, the recovery is truly remarkable.

The current one-horned rhino census in India and Nepal, the only other country with larger one-horned rhinos, found that the total population has risen to 4,014.

The governments of India and Nepal have allocated more land in which rhinos can breed while creating new strategies to prevent poaching deaths.

6. A new law in Spain aims to eliminate food waste

Bringing your leftovers home is commonplace in the US, but raises a few eyebrows in most parts of Europe.

The Spanish government wants to break this taboo and has approved a bill requiring restaurants to provide free containers to customers who want to take their leftovers home.

The bill, which still needs to be approved by parliament, will require large bars, restaurants and supermarkets to submit plans to prevent food waste, such as working with NGOs.

The priority should be human consumption through donations to entities such as food banks, but if this is not possible, leftover food can be turned into other products such as juices or jams, or used for animal feed.

And if none of these are suitable, food waste can be turned into industrial by-products or recycled into compost or fuel.

Companies that produce and supply food will have to report annually on how much they waste and must provide incentives with lower prices for selling products close to the best before date.

For serious breaches, they face penalties of up to €60,000 – with fines of up to half a million euros for repeat offenders.

“It is a pioneering legal instrument to prevent the inefficiency of the food chain, which has economic consequences, due to the loss of what is produced and not used; social, due to what represents an unmet need from a food point of view; environmental, for the use of natural resources; and ethical, in a world where, unfortunately, hunger persists”, said Luis Planas, Spanish Minister of Agriculture.

This law aims to comply with one of the sustainable development goals of the UN’s 2030 Agenda: which is to halve food waste in the world.

And if you’re still hungry for more positive news, click for more above.

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Ancient site may be location of oldest known human fossils in China https://disturbmedia.com/ancient-site-may-be-location-of-oldest-known-human-fossils-in-china/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 16:33:27 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/ancient-site-may-be-location-of-oldest-known-human-fossils-in-china/ An international team of researchers has authored a study claiming to have discovered what is possibly the oldest existing human fossil in China. Researchers from the National Center for Research on Human Evolution (CENIEH) in Spain, part of a team of Chinese, Spanish and French scientists, have just published the study on what is perhaps […]]]>

An international team of researchers has authored a study claiming to have discovered what is possibly the oldest existing human fossil in China.

Researchers from the National Center for Research on Human Evolution (CENIEH) in Spain, part of a team of Chinese, Spanish and French scientists, have just published the study on what is perhaps the oldest human fossil. known in the country.

Researchers used X-ray microcomputer tomography techniques, geometric morphometry and classical morphology to investigate the remains of the upper jaw and five cranial teeth from the Chinese site of Gongwangling.

Researchers used X-ray microcomputer tomography techniques, geometric morphometry and classical morphology to investigate the remains of the upper jaw and five cranial teeth from the Chinese site of Gongwangling.
Xing Song, CENIEH/Zenger

The researchers said in a CENIEH statement released on Monday: “This deposit is located in the vast plains on the northern slopes of the Quinling Mountains in Shaanxi Province, central China, and was discovered in 1963 by the scientist Woo Ju Kang.

“The age of the site was reassessed in 2015 through paleomagnetism studies in the area. The data suggests that the Gongwangling remains date to just over 1.6 million years ago, so they could belong to one of the first humans to colonize the current state of China.”

According to the study, there are similarities between the teeth of Gongwangling and those of other more recent Chinese sites of Meipu and Quyuan River Mouth. But they added that there was also “some variability, which suggests some diversity in the populations of homo erectus who colonized Asia in the Pleistocene.”

The Pleistocene or ice age lasted from 2,580,000 to 11,700 years ago and was noted for several advances and retreats of continental glaciers.

Hominid Australopithecus afarensis
An international team of researchers has authored a study claiming to have discovered what is possibly the oldest existing human fossil in China. In this photo, a sculptor’s rendering of the hominid Australopithecus afarensis is shown as part of an exhibit that includes the 3.2 million-year-old fossilized remains of ‘Lucy’, the oldest example complete species, at the Houston Museum of Natural Science, August 28, 2007, in Houston, Texas.
Dave Einsel/Getty Images

The CENIEH press release also states: “The importance of this new work lies in the paucity of information on the early colonization of Asia. The site of Dmanisi (Republic of Georgia) has provided very important evidence on the first inhabitants of Asia, who arrived from Africa. about two million years ago.

Reconstruction of a prehistoric caveman
Portrait of a reconstruction of a prehistoric caveman at the Chicago Field Museum.
Henry Guttmann Collection/Hulton Archives/Getty Images

“But a lot of information is missing to link Dmanisi to the classic homo erectus populations of China (Hexian, Yiyuan, Xichuan or Zhoukoudian), who lived on this great landmass between 400,000 and 800,000 years ago.”

José María Bermúdez de Castro, coordinator of the paleobiology program at CENIEH, is quoted as saying: “The site of Gongwangling fills in this enormous period and suggests that Asia could have been populated by successive populations of the homo erectus species at different epochs of the Pleistocene.”

The press release also specifies that the Gongwangling skull “has all the characteristics described in Homo erectus: low and very elongated skull, with very thick bones, which protected a brain of approximately 780 cubic centimeters; strongly inclined forehead, with very marked eyebrow arches and forming a sort of double-arched visor above the eyes […].”

The study is published in the July 2022 edition of the Journal of Human Evolution. It was written by Lei Pan, Clement Zanolli, Maria Martinon-Torres, Jose Maria Bermudez de Castro, Laura Martin-Frances, Song Xing and Wu Liu.

This story was provided to Newsweek by Zenger News.

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Filipinos in Honiara celebrate Independence Day – Solomon Star News https://disturbmedia.com/filipinos-in-honiara-celebrate-independence-day-solomon-star-news/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 22:32:28 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/filipinos-in-honiara-celebrate-independence-day-solomon-star-news/ MORE than 200 Filipinos living and working in Honiara celebrated their country’s 124th birthdaye Independence Day at Lela Beach, North West Guadalcanal on the 12the Sunday 2022. President of the Filipino Community of the Solomon Islands (Filcomsi), Mrs. Myrtle Atienza had the honor of welcoming members of the community as they join Filipino communities around […]]]>

MORE than 200 Filipinos living and working in Honiara celebrated their country’s 124th birthdaye Independence Day at Lela Beach, North West Guadalcanal on the 12the Sunday 2022.

President of the Filipino Community of the Solomon Islands (Filcomsi), Mrs. Myrtle Atienza had the honor of welcoming members of the community as they join Filipino communities around the world in celebrating the Independence Day of their country.

“I want to thank you all for coming here to celebrate our independence,” she said.

The theme of this year’s celebration is “PAGSUONG SA HAMON NG PANIBAGONG BUKAS” which in English “Ascend to the challenge of a new beginning”,

The theme reflects not only the hard work and sacrifices of Filipino heroes who fought for the country’s independence, but also the contribution of many Filipinos in the last year of the pandemic and encourages the country to strive towards a better future.

She said that despite all the challenges, they are looking forward to a better future together.

“As we all face hardships in our lives, we always look forward to a brighter future,” she said.

Atienza said the theme fit well with their circumstances due to the challenges they faced away from home.

On the same note, she thanked her fellow officers for supporting her as President of Filcomsi to successfully celebrate and mark the anniversary of their beloved country.

The Independence Day celebration began with the raising of the flag and the singing of the national anthem of the Philippines.

A parade ceremony was followed afterwards with all Filipinos organized in their provincial groups to showcase their cultures and traditions.

In addition to the celebration, a panel of judges was set up to determine the best parade and performance group.

The winner for Best Performance Group went to Tacloban Province followed by Laguna, Iloilo, Davao and Baguio Province.

Some provinces could not participate in the parade because they were not prepared.

Highlights of the celebration include cultural entertainment, quizzes, raffle ticket draws and card games for children.

The Filipino bazaar had also come to showcase the taste of Filipino dishes.

According to history, the Philippines got its name from Philip II, King of Spain during the Spanish colonization of the islands in the 16th century, as it was under Spanish rule for 333 years and American trusteeship for 48 years. He had many cultural affinities with the west.

In 1898, the Philippines redeemed its independence from slavery in Spain.

The Philippine archipelago is bounded by the Philippine Sea to the east, the Celebes Sea to the south, the Sulu Sea to the southwest, and the South China Sea to the west and north.

It comprises more than seven thousand islands, divided into three main groups: Luzon, Visayas and Mindanao.

There are approximately 120 to 187 languages ​​spoken in the Philippines.

Currently, the population of the Philippines exceeds 112 million.

Meanwhile, Atienza thanked all attendees and sponsors for making the celebration memorable, especially Fairtrade Company Ltd, Chun Wah School, Grand Pacific Investment Ltd, Nalalia Lizardo Noprada, Solitario Family, Cyndi Co, Evangeline Ciego, Monica Beng Repollo , Niel Buendia, Dragon Construction Francis Mercado, Bluewater, Myrtle Atienza, Twins Paint, Everise, LRS Engineering, Tropical Helicopters, DVL, Elriech Design, M Cube Ltd, Pan Pacific, Islands Deals, Farmset and Upshine Jewelers and Accessories.

By LACHLAN EDDIE
Press room, Honiara

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Why Cyclists Head to Girona, Spain https://disturbmedia.com/why-cyclists-head-to-girona-spain/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 23:38:23 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/why-cyclists-head-to-girona-spain/ I didn’t think physics and the laws of gravity would allow it, but it is possible to cycle at 5 km/h – slower than a motivated pedestrian – on a bicycle without falling. If someone had told me this before I started climbing the nearby mountain, Rocacorba, a classic and incredibly steep bike ride near […]]]>

I didn’t think physics and the laws of gravity would allow it, but it is possible to cycle at 5 km/h – slower than a motivated pedestrian – on a bicycle without falling. If someone had told me this before I started climbing the nearby mountain, Rocacorba, a classic and incredibly steep bike ride near the city of Girona in northern Spain, I wouldn’t have believed them. . But, climbing the mountain, my Garmin GPS watch and bike computer mounted on the handlebars of my rental bike – I’m so in disbelief, I have to check both – agree that my riding speed is, in fact, at the same rhythm than snail sleepwalking.

My course on the road, which climbs about 2,600 vertical feet for about seven miles, is far from straight. To keep myself from tipping over, I constantly adjust my direction and body position, resulting in a trajectory that “wobbly” barely begins to describe. About four miles into the climb, shortly after the road goes from steep to mindlessly steep, I think stumbling over the jagged pavement might be less painful than grinding it.

Even in grandma’s tallest gear, I find it impossible to pedal smoothly uphill with inclines approaching and sometimes exceeding 13%. I have sharp, stabbing pains in both knees. The rash seems preferable.

At the beginning of April, the first day of a week’s cycling holiday, there is no particular reason beyond curiosity that I decide to ride from Girona to Rocacorba via Banyoles lake, the cattail lake which was the site of the rowing events during the Barcelona Olympics in 1992.

I’m curious about Rocacorba, because it’s easily visible from almost anywhere in Girona, a city of about 100,000 people and close to the Pyrenees and the Mediterranean Sea, with a medieval old town that was used as a filming location for HBO’s “Game of Thrones.” Also I’m curious because Rocacorba is one of the Rihannas of road riding in Europe, a race so famous among cyclists that it only needs one name, like Stelvio in the north of Italy, Tourmalet and Ventoux in France, and Sa Calobra on the Spanish island of Majorca.

Halfway up the climb, I decide that curiosity might kill me – or at least make my knees so sore they won’t want to ride the rest of the week. I turn around. After all, Girona is today recognized as one of the greatest cycling destinations in Europe and has a diversity of routes and rides. If I don’t like climbing a steep climb, there is no need to climb a steep climb.

Christian Meier, a retired Canadian professional cyclist who raced the 2014 Tour de France with the Orica-GreenEdge team and has lived in Girona since 2008, agrees. “One of the great things about Girona is that you have all kinds of rides,” he says over an espresso at La Fabrica, a cafe in Girona’s old town that he and his wife, Amber, have founded in 2015. ” The high Pyrenees are not far away, the coastal road is quite spectacular and you have climbs from Rocacorba to Els Àngels, which is just behind the town and has a nice slope. It gives me more than bit of satisfaction to hear that Meier himself isn’t enjoying the ride to Rocacorba. “It’s super steep and impossible to get into a rhythm, and the road surface is not in very good condition. There are so many other better climbs in the area,” he says.

Meier is part of the second generation of professionals who call Girona home. Among the first English-speaking pros to move to Girona were George Hincapie (in 1997) and Lance Armstrong (in 2001), who decided they liked it more than Nice, France, their old base. In the following years, a handful of Armstrong and Hincapie teammates followed. Meier says Girona was still a “sleepy city” when he arrived, but in the early 2010s the city really caught on with professional runners. “At one point we were over 100,” he says.

It is in the last five years that Girona has established itself as a cycling destination for non-professionals. “There may be nicer places to ride – like Tuscany or the Dolomites – but Girona is the perfect storm for a cycling holiday,” says Meier. “You can choose how much you want to ride your bike, and you’re in an amazing historic European city with art, culture, and great restaurants, and there’s also hiking and running walk.”

And, not that I timed this, but for about a month in early spring, there are fields of neon yellow blooming canola. On the way to Banyoles lake and Rocacorba, the sky is overcast, but I have to wear sunglasses, because the fields are so bright.

Meier tells me that I should absolutely drive to the Mediterranean Sea, east of Girona. The 160 miles of Spanish coastline between the mouth of the Tordera River northeast of Barcelona, ​​in the province of Girona and up to the French border, is called the Costa Brava. The morning after Rocacorba, however, I return to the store where I rented my road bike, Cycle Tours Catalonia, and ask for GPS directions for rides that maximize canola-sighting opportunities. I can’t imagine a landscape – even the rugged Costa Brava – beating the canola in bloom.

Canola fields are not the only criteria I give to Carlos, the store manager. I ask for rides between 40 and 65 miles and with climbs no steeper than 8% grade.

“So flat rides?” he asks. I say no before he finishes his question. I love going down. Descending on a bike at speeds between 30 and 60 mph—speeds that, yes, can be terrifying, and which took me a long time to get comfortable with—is as close to flying as it gets. I would happily pedal uphill for several hours to enjoy this feeling, but not if it causes me severe pain in my knees. Also, steep roads are difficult to climb and descending them is often less satisfying than descending a road with a moderate gradient. Steeper roads generally require more braking, which means less flight feel.

Carlos has a library of over 100 GPS tracks, and he quickly finds five that meet my criteria and uploads them to the Garmin bike computer I brought from home. (If you don’t have your own computer, the store rents them too.)

I start with a 62-mile loop that includes canola fields, a moderate climb of about 1,500 feet up a mountain in the Catalan Coast Range, a fun descent to the Mediterranean, and on the way back to Girona , plus rapeseed fields. Along the way there are also churches that date back to the 17th century, forests of cork, oak and chestnut trees, and more cyclists – speaking German, French, Catalan, Spanish, Swedish and English with an Australian accent – ​​than cars.

At the bottom of the descent from Sant Grau d’Ardenya, where the GIP-6821 ends and I turn north on the GI-682, nicknamed the “Route of 1000 bends”, I stop at the top of a steep cliff that plummets into the Mediterranean to take Photos. I stop again at least every quarter mile for the next 10 miles. The canola fields aren’t the best scenery the area has to offer.

In Sant Feliu de Guíxols, the northern terminus of the incredibly photogenic Route of 1,000 Bends, I’m tempted to have lunch at one of the many open-air restaurants overlooking the town’s beach and harbor. But I have a reservation for a late afternoon chocolate-themed brunch on the roof terrace of a hotel in Girona, about 40 km away. So instead, I munch on the xuixo, a deep-fried regional pastry, coated in sugar and stuffed with Catalan cream, which I bought in the morning at the bakery down the street from my apartment and get back in the saddle.

During the week, I don’t do the five rides that Carlos uploaded to my Garmin. One of them – the “Hincapie Loop”, so named because it was one of Hincapie’s favorites – has two perfectly inclined climbs (and descents), fields of canola in blinding bloom, villages with cobbled streets and vast panoramas of the Pyrenees and the Mediterranean. I do it twice.

Another day, with Meier’s words that horseback riding is just part of Girona’s appeal in my head, I leave my bike in my apartment. Instead, I walk about 90 minutes from Girona’s old town to the ruins of an ancient mountaintop castle in the nature reserve, Les Gavarres, southeast of the city. I also survey the stone walls dating from the 9th century which made it possible to protect (or not) the city from Visigoth, Moorish and French invaders. At a gelateria branch of a nearby three-star Michelin restaurant, I try a violet-coconut sorbet. A few hours later, because violet, a new flavor for me, turned out to be quite tasty, I have the confidence to come back to try another unusual flavor of ice cream, parmesan, which I prefer over pasta. An evening in the thermal baths washes away the last of the residual Rocacorba pain from my knees.

Information: spain.info/en

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Spain’s doggy bag law and similar legislation in other countries to stop food waste https://disturbmedia.com/spains-doggy-bag-law-and-similar-legislation-in-other-countries-to-stop-food-waste/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 12:39:39 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/spains-doggy-bag-law-and-similar-legislation-in-other-countries-to-stop-food-waste/ A new bill passed in Spain requires restaurants and bars across the country to offer free doggy bags to customers. Let’s look at other countries that have laws to reduce food waste Food waste remains a big problem in the West even as 690 million people, or 8.9% of the world’s population, struggle with hunger. […]]]>

A new bill passed in Spain requires restaurants and bars across the country to offer free doggy bags to customers. Let’s look at other countries that have laws to reduce food waste

Food waste remains a big problem in the West even as 690 million people, or 8.9% of the world’s population, struggle with hunger. In an important step to combat food waste, Spain has passed a new doggy bag law.

What is the “doggy bag law”?

Under new legislation passed by the Spanish government on Tuesday, restaurants and bars across the country will be forced to offer free ‘doggy bags’ to customers to take home food they don’t have Ate. Restaurant owners could be fined 2,000 euros if they do not offer doggy bags.

That’s not all. Companies in the food industry will have to make plans to try to reduce the amount of food wasted or face possible fines.

Shops and supermarkets will be asked to reduce the price of products as their recommended use-by date approaches and also to enter into agreements with neighborhood organizations and food banks for the donation of such products to help the needy. , reports the news agency. The Associated Press.

Once the expiry date has passed, the law recommends that the foodstuffs be used as animal feed or in the industrial production of fertilizers and biofuels.

Spain’s Agriculture, Fisheries and Food Minister Luis Planas said the bill was aimed at “regulating and raising awareness”.

“In a world where, unfortunately, hunger and malnutrition exist, these issues weigh on everyone’s conscience,” he said after the Council of Ministers meeting.

How much food does Spain waste?

According to the government, Spain wastes 1.36 million tonnes of food and drink every year, which equates to around 31 kilograms per person and a loss of around €250 per capita.

What about waste in the rest of the world?

According to a 2021 study by the United Nations Environment Programme, more than 930 million tonnes of food sold in 2019 was thrown away. This volume would fill enough 40-tonne trucks to circumnavigate the globe seven times.

A fifth of the food available to consumers in stores, restaurants and in our homes is thrown directly into the trash, the report says.

The European Union recently pledged to halve consumer and industry food waste in the bloc by 2030, in line with UN targets.

More than 930 million tonnes of food sold in 2019 was thrown away, according to the UN. AFP

What are other European nations doing?

Like Spain, France, in early 2016, introduced the “doggy bag” law to reduce the huge amount of food waste in the country.

At the time, French catering alone accounted for around one million tonnes of food waste a year, according to government figures.

The law was part of an initiative launched by the French government in 2013, aiming to reduce food waste by 50% by 2025.

Until 2016, bringing leftovers home was unheard of in France. A 2014 survey found that 70% of people had never taken leftovers home.

Months after the French, Italy passed a law in August 2016 that encouraged companies to donate or donate food past its sell-by date (companies were previously sanctioned for this) and offered a benefit if they did: the more food they had. donate, the less waste tax they paid. Farmers were also allowed to donate unsold produce.

Three months ago, Italy’s highest court ruled that stealing small amounts of food to stave off hunger was not a crime.

Explanation of the Spanish doggy bag law and similar legislation in other countries to stop food waste

France, Germany and Italy are among the European nations that are committed to reducing food waste. AFP

What about other nations in Europe?

In 2018, the UK announced a program to reduce food waste from food retailers and manufacturers.

The government has worked with non-profit organization Wrap and food charity IGD on a roadmap to reduce food waste, which includes ways for businesses to reduce waste at every stage of their supply chain. ‘supply.

In 2019, food waste in the UK was 10.2 million tonnes per year.

Germany has also pledged to halve the amount of food thrown away in the country by 2030. A big part of the plan is to package food in smaller quantities.

Does the United States have similar laws?

The United States is one of the worst offenders when it comes to food waste. It would reject more than 40 million tons of food every day. Most US states follow the Bill Emerson Good Samaritan Food Donation Act which encourages food donations to charities by minimizing liability.

However, Arizona and California are among 12 states that have their own food waste legislation. Arizona offers two relevant tax incentives – a deduction for restaurants that donate food to nonprofits and a tax deduction for farmers or agricultural processors who donate crops.

California liability protection legislation covers food fit for human consumption, regardless of packaging and labeling laws, including whether the food is past its best before date, as long as the person who distributes it to the final recipient considers the food to be healthy. This extension of protection is far greater than in other states and helps solve the problem of mislabeled foods, reports RTS.

It also has tax incentives for farmers who donate food to banks and has a strict organic waste recycling law that aims to reduce organic waste in businesses.

Explanation of the Spanish doggy bag law and similar legislation in other countries to stop food waste

A staff member installs signs encouraging people not to waste food at a restaurant in Handan, northern China’s Hebei province, in August 2020. AFP

And Asia?

The Japanese government enacted the Food Recycling Law in 2001, which aimed to reduce food waste and promote recycling. The Food Recycling Act requires all entities affected by food waste at the stages of food production, distribution and consumption, including consumers, businesses and national and local governments, to strive control the production of waste, promote recycling and reduce the volume of waste.

China passed a strict law in 2021 that bans binge eating videos, competitive eating and excessive leftovers. Restaurants have the right to charge an additional fee to any customer who leaves excessive amounts of food uneaten. Restaurants that consistently waste large amounts of food face a fine of up to 50,000 yuan ($7,735).

With contributions from agencies

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The Spanish National Police dismantles 2 migrant smuggling networks that facilitated movement between Morocco and the Canary Islands https://disturbmedia.com/the-spanish-national-police-dismantles-2-migrant-smuggling-networks-that-facilitated-movement-between-morocco-and-the-canary-islands/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 02:27:09 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/the-spanish-national-police-dismantles-2-migrant-smuggling-networks-that-facilitated-movement-between-morocco-and-the-canary-islands/ Spain’s Interior Ministry revealed that the country’s national police had dismantled two interconnected criminal organizations involved in migrant smuggling activities between Morocco and the Canary Islands. According to the Spanish authorities, the leaders of these two criminal networks are responsible for the arrival of 204 Moroccan migrants on the coasts of Lanzarote and Fuerteventura, reports […]]]>

Spain’s Interior Ministry revealed that the country’s national police had dismantled two interconnected criminal organizations involved in migrant smuggling activities between Morocco and the Canary Islands.

According to the Spanish authorities, the leaders of these two criminal networks are responsible for the arrival of 204 Moroccan migrants on the coasts of Lanzarote and Fuerteventura, reports SchengenVisaInfo.com.

“The leaders of the organizations would be responsible for the arrival on the coasts of Lanzarote and Fuerteventura of six boats with 204 Moroccan migrants”, the ministry statement said.

The leaders of these two criminal networks charged an average of €3,000 to each migrant for their service. Considering such a high amount, it is estimated that the profit of the networks is around €612,000.

After carrying out several investigations, the Spanish police were able to arrest eight people, three of whom are currently in pre-trial detention.

The ministry revealed that of the eight people, four were arrested in the province of Las Palmas, two in Murcia and one in Vizcaya. Moreover, it was noted that three of these individuals remain in provisional detention.

“After several investigations and procedures carried out by the national police, it was possible to clarify the existence of two criminal organizations dedicated to the smuggling of Moroccan migrants, perfectly structured and connected to each other, which operated from the Moroccan coast. in the Canary Islands,” noted the ministry.

The latter said that once the agents had gathered all the necessary evidence, around 100 police officers carried out several searches at the leaders’ homes. During these actions, the police were able to find numerous electronic devices as well as documents related to different transactions carried out by migrants.

“The eight people arrested during the investigation have been made available to the judicial authority as presumed responsible for violations of the rights of foreign citizens, membership in a criminal organization and false documents”, added the ministry.

The Spanish police have carried out various operations this year. Earlier in May, the Home Office revealed that the National Police were investigating four British citizens who allegedly forged padrón documents.

Authorities said the four had forged padrón documents so they could obtain Spanish residency status after the UK left the European Union.

The four individuals still under investigation are based in the Canary Islands.

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Telefónica selects Mavenir for cloud-native IMS Core https://disturbmedia.com/telefonica-selects-mavenir-for-cloud-native-ims-core/ Thu, 02 Jun 2022 11:03:01 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/telefonica-selects-mavenir-for-cloud-native-ims-core/ Links to the breadcrumb Author of the article: Content of the article Mavenir’s fixed and mobile cloud-native IMS covers three major Latin American countries for Telefónica BUENOS AIRES, Argentina and MEXICO CITY — Mavenir, the networking software provider building the future of networks with cloud-native software that runs on any cloud and transforms the way […]]]>

Content of the article

Mavenir’s fixed and mobile cloud-native IMS covers three major Latin American countries for Telefónica

BUENOS AIRES, Argentina and MEXICO CITY — Mavenir, the networking software provider building the future of networks with cloud-native software that runs on any cloud and transforms the way the world connects, confirms today today its selection by Telefónica Hispam (Hispanoamérica) to provide cloud – native IMS Core for fixed and mobile networks in Mexico, Colombia and Chile.

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As mobile networks continue to evolve and handle growing data and device needs, Mavenir’s cloud-native IMS platform serves as the foundation technology for 5G networks. Transitioning to an automated, cloud-native IMS will allow Telefónica Hispam to scale all fixed and mobile voice services and modernize its operations. The solution will be deployed on TCloud, Telefónica’s private telecommunications cloud infrastructure.

Mavenir’s IMS is purpose-built for fully automated cloud environments, enabling Telefónica to operate with web-scale agility, ensuring 5G transformation is layered on top of existing 4G networks using a based on microservices. Deploying zero-touch continuous integration, continuous deployment (CI/CD) containerized environments increases productivity and leverages current network investment with a 5G-enabled, cloud-native IMS core platform.

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Alejandro Ghianni, Director of Planning and Engineering at Telefónica Hispam, said: “At Telefónica, we understand that core network functions need to be modernized to support network evolution, and virtualized architectures will need software that supports both VoLTE and 5G Voice. We are very excited to embark on this network transformation journey with Mavenir. »

Javier Gavilan, CALA Region CTO of Mavenir, said, “Only a cloud-native network, transformed into an all-web platform, can meet the demands of a successful 5G transformation. Mavenir’s cloud-native IMS Core can be deployed on any cloud, eliminating legacy hardware platforms. This mobile-first architecture has been deployed in a variety of large multi-vendor environments, including O2 Telefónica in Germany and Virgin Mobile O2 in the UK. We are very happy to have been awarded for this important project by Telefónica Hispam.

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“Mavenir is the global leader in cloud-native mobile network software applications, supporting over 3 billion subscribers worldwide. Mavenir’s modernized software approach transforms mobile communications networks to operate in a fully virtualized environment, where devices, applications and services can run on an automated network using open architectures, containers and intelligence artificial,” concluded Gavilan.

About Mavenir:

Mavenir is building the future of pioneering edge networks and technologies, focusing on the vision of a single software-based automated network that runs on any cloud. As the industry’s only end-to-end cloud-native networking software provider, Mavenir is focused on transforming the way the world connects, accelerating software networking transformation for more than 250 communications service providers and companies in more than 120 countries, which serve more than 50% of subscribers worldwide. www.mavenir.com

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About Telefónica Hispam:

Telefónica is one of the largest telecommunications service providers in Spanish America. The company operates under the Movistar brand and offers fixed broadband connectivity services -with FTTH solutions- and mobile with 4G networks, as well as a wide range of digital services for more than 109 million residential and business customers. region. Telefónica Hispam offers its services in: Mexico, Colombia, Venezuela, Peru, Ecuador, Uruguay, Chile and Argentina.

See the source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220602005163/en/

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contacts

Mavenir PR contacts:
PR@mavenir.com
Emmanuela Spiteri

Telefónica Hispam PR contacts:
dulce.jimenez@telefonica.com
Dulce Jiménez

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The 7 best new spas in the world in 2022 https://disturbmedia.com/the-7-best-new-spas-in-the-world-in-2022/ Tue, 31 May 2022 13:47:38 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/the-7-best-new-spas-in-the-world-in-2022/ After two turbulent years spent on high alert and close to home, destination spas offer those weary of working from home a time-tested opportunity to rejuvenate both mind and body. After all, the culture of spa recovery dates back to ancient times, when Roman soldiers bathed to heal wounds and Greek philosopher Hippocrates embraced scented […]]]>

After two turbulent years spent on high alert and close to home, destination spas offer those weary of working from home a time-tested opportunity to rejuvenate both mind and body. After all, the culture of spa recovery dates back to ancient times, when Roman soldiers bathed to heal wounds and Greek philosopher Hippocrates embraced scented massage for optimal health. Whether you covet sunny beaches or the invigorating country air, these sparkling new spas (all opened within the last year) offer thoughtful spaces unique to the culture and rejuvenating environment of each region. These are the ideal places to refocus, release inspiration or perfect what the Dutch call Niksen: the art of doing nothing.

Monteverdi Tuscany, Italy

Hidden in a medieval village overlooking the rolling Tuscan countryside, this charming boutique hotel has undergone extensive renovations during the pandemic, with the new spa and wellness center opening last June. Inspired by the landscape and traditions of Tuscany, private outdoor treatment spaces include handcrafted travertine tubs, where bathing rituals take place, and a cold plunge pool carved into craggy rocks. Try the Monteverdi Purifying Facial, which blends fresh Tuscan herbs such as Echinacea, Sage, Burdock and Witch Hazel with ultrasonic technology, for a truly deep cleanse. Later, unwind with a private or couples outdoor Hatha yoga class that incorporates ancient breathing techniques while admiring stunning views of the Val d’Orcia.

Via di Mezzo, Castiglioncello del Trinoro, 53047, Sarteano (SI), Italy www.monteverdituscany.com

spa room montiverde italy

(Image credit: Courtesy of Montiverde)

Numú Wellness Center at Hotel Nantipa, Santa Teresa, Costa Rica

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