Spanish state – Disturb Media http://disturbmedia.com/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 01:14:31 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://disturbmedia.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-6-120x120.png Spanish state – Disturb Media http://disturbmedia.com/ 32 32 “Health and safety are in danger”: only one safety inspector in California is bilingual in Chinese or Vietnamese https://disturbmedia.com/health-and-safety-are-in-danger-only-one-safety-inspector-in-california-is-bilingual-in-chinese-or-vietnamese/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 01:14:31 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/health-and-safety-are-in-danger-only-one-safety-inspector-in-california-is-bilingual-in-chinese-or-vietnamese/ In the nearly 30 years since Thomas Xiao arrived in San Francisco, he said he has seen co-workers injured in restaurants, factories and other jobs. Xiao himself suffered torn tendons in his right shoulder in 2019, a stress injury he says was caused by throwing a heavy fryer with potatoes over and over for years. […]]]>

In the nearly 30 years since Thomas Xiao arrived in San Francisco, he said he has seen co-workers injured in restaurants, factories and other jobs. Xiao himself suffered torn tendons in his right shoulder in 2019, a stress injury he says was caused by throwing a heavy fryer with potatoes over and over for years.

“It got really painful. I couldn’t even raise my hand,” Xiao said in Cantonese through an interpreter from the Chinese Progressive Association, a nonprofit organization in San Francisco.

But until recently, the 66-year-old Chinese immigrant had never considered filing a complaint with California regulators charged with protecting workplace health and safety. Xiao, who now works as a janitor, said he didn’t know Cal/OSHA existed, let alone that the agency can investigate workplace hazards like repetitive strain injuries.

In one of the most linguistically diverse states in the country, Cal/OSHA officials argue that a high priority (PDF) is “direct communication” with workers who have limited English proficiency. Due to a lack of English skills or legal status, many immigrants work part of the lowest paid most dangerous jobs.

Essential Cal/OSHA services remain largely inaccessible to these same workers, leaving them less protected, according to labor experts and worker advocates. A significant problem is the woefully insufficient number of bilingual agency safety inspectors who are required to interview employees when investigating workplace complaints, injuries or fatalities.

It’s even if State and federal laws (PDF) require public agencies like Cal/OSHA, officially known as the Division of Occupational Safety and Health, to take reasonable steps to provide full and equal access to their services to people who are not fluent English.

Cal/OSHA language access gaps are especially pronounced for workers in large Asian communities across the state, especially in the Bay Area and Los Angeles and Orange counties.

An analysis of 2019 census data by USC Equity Research Institute conducted for KQED shows that the most common state languages ​​after English and Spanish are Chinese, Filipino and Vietnamese, which are spoken by approximately 600,000 workers combined with limited English proficiency or no way.

Of the 214 inspectors employed by Cal/OSHA, only 21 were certified in a second language as of October, according to personnel records. Nineteen were Spanish-speaking, while only one was fluent in Cantonese and one in Vietnamese.

“This is very surprising, disturbing and disappointing information,” said David Chiu, cattorney in the city of San Francisco, where more workers speak Chinese at home than Spanish, unlike elsewhere in the state.

“When you have literally millions of Californians who speak other languages ​​who are especially vulnerable to workplace exploitation, the lack of language skills on the part of Cal/OSHA staff means we don’t know what is happening in these jobs, we cannot enforce the law, and workers’ lives, health and safety are at risk,” Chiu said.

Cal/OSHA declined KQED’s interview requests.

A line graph showing the estimated total number of LEP workers in California, 2010-2019

The agency is committed to communicating with workers and employers in their preferred language, said a spokesperson for the California Department of Industrial Relations, which oversees Cal/OSHA and other law enforcement divisions on work. Cal/OSHA has additional staff who speak a second language but are not certified bilingualwhich involves passing a fluency test, the spokesperson said.

Still, two former Cal/OSHA inspectors, also known as compliance safety and health officers, told KQED that the insufficient number of bilingual-certified inspectors suggests just how ill-equipped the agency is. to conduct investigations involving workers who primarily speak languages ​​other than English.

“I think it’s pretty obvious that they don’t have the same protections as an English-speaking worker,” said Michael Horowitz, retired Cal/OSHA inspector and district enforcement officer in Oakland. “It’s much harder to clearly bring their issues and hazards to the attention of a state health and safety inspector.”

Since mid-2019, Cal/OSHA has lost about a third of its certified bilingual inspectors, all of whom are Spanish-speaking, according to a KQED analysis of monthly-paid employee rosters. bilingual bonus after being certified in another language.

As of last month, only 5% of the agency’s total 964 budgeted postsincluding outreach workers, managers and legal secretaries, were filled with bilingual paid staff.

It comes as the number of California workers with limited English proficiency soared to 3.4 million, or nearly 1 in 5 of the state’s labor force, according to analysis by USC Equity Research. Institute.

A portrait of a middle aged man.
Thomas Xiao, 66, stands at the Women’s Building in San Francisco after attending a town hall for essential workers on September 28, 2022. Xiao, who works as a janitor, said he had never heard of Cal /OSHA until recently. (Farida Jhabvala Romero/KQED)

Using the estimated number of workers who speak other languages ​​at home but report limited English proficiency, KQED calculated an approximate ratio of inspectors who can communicate fluently with them.

Chinese-speaking workers experience the largest access gap, with one inspector certified in Cantonese for every 309,000 workers. For Vietnamese-speaking employees, Cal/OSHA has one inspector for every 167,000 workers. And for Spanish speakers, there is one inspector for every 124,000 workers.

Although far from ideal compared to other states, the ratio of safety and health officers to workers who speak English as a native language or very well is much more protective: one inspector for every 72,000 workers.

“A lot gets lost in translation”

Many immigrant employees in high-risk industries are reluctant to tell inspectors about problems they witness because they fear losing their jobs or mistrust government agencies.

If inspectors aren’t able to speak directly with workers and gain their trust, they can miss serious health and safety risks, said Horowitz, who has worked for Cal/OSHA for more than 17 year. Effective investigations could eventually lead to fines for employers and safer conditions for employees.

Horowitz said inspectors can rely on a foreman or manager to interpret, but workers will be less likely to speak up if their boss is present.

“It’s not a good situation to get a true picture of what the workplace hazards might be,” Horowitz said. “A lot gets lost in translation. Clearly some money could be spent there, but it’s definitely not a priority I’ve seen in the state.

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MU students lead healthcare efforts for Spanish speakers https://disturbmedia.com/mu-students-lead-healthcare-efforts-for-spanish-speakers/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 21:11:09 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/mu-students-lead-healthcare-efforts-for-spanish-speakers/ Benjamin Guillen, 51, a resident of Columbia, is his parents’ caretaker. When the medical clinics they go to don’t offer services in Spanish, Guillen said staff use screen technology to translate. Sometimes Guillen translates, although he still struggles to understand some English words himself. “My mother, as a woman, would like to speak privately with […]]]>

Benjamin Guillen, 51, a resident of Columbia, is his parents’ caretaker.

When the medical clinics they go to don’t offer services in Spanish, Guillen said staff use screen technology to translate.

Sometimes Guillen translates, although he still struggles to understand some English words himself.

“My mother, as a woman, would like to speak privately with the doctor,” Guillen said in Spanish. “For her, it’s complicated that her son has to listen to her problems and then be able to translate.”

Members of MU’s Latino Medical Student Association (LMSA) chapter lead initiatives to bridge the gaps between healthcare professionals and Spanish-speaking patients.

According to the US Census American Community Survey 2021, 13.2% of the country’s population — more than 41 million people — speaks Spanish at home. In Missouri, the number of native Spanish speakers drops to 2.6%. But, while the state’s Hispanic population remains small, it increased by 42.6% during the previous decade. Boone County alone added 3,157 people to its Hispanic population between 2010 and 2020.

Studies show that Hispanics had the highest uninsured rate of any ethnic group in 2020. Lack of access to health insurance shapes hispanic healthas well as lack of preventive care and language and cultural barriers, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of Minority Health.

Connor Diaz, co-chair of the LMSA chapter of MU, said these barriers can create fear or mistrust when Spanish-speaking patients visit a clinic. He said he really felt the tension in the room with the patients.

Then he introduces himself: “Yo soy Connor Diaz. Yo be a student of medicina trabajando con su doctor. ¿Quieres hablar en Español?”

And the tension in the room is easing, Diaz said.

“We could do more”

LMSA members organized a community clinic that offered free, Spanish-language medical services on Monday at the Centro Latino de Salud.

The idea was born when Paola Orozco, who is Diaz’s co-president of LMSA, noticed the level of trust that opens up when she talks to patients in Spanish.

“Right there, I started to feel that we could do more in Columbia’s Latino community to be able to reach those people whose first language is Spanish,” Orozco said.

Michelle Gutierrez

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Missourian

Medical supplies sit on a table Monday at the Centro Latino de Salud in Colombia. The MU Chapter of the Latin American Medical Students Association organized the clinic with help from the School of Medicine and received flu shots from the MedZou Community Health Clinic.

Orozco contacted the Centro Latino de Salud. Raquel Ortiz, secretary of LMSA, contacted the community health clinic MedZou, which provided flu shots. MU medical school students administered the injections, screened for diabetes, and performed blood pressure checks. Ortiz and Gabriela Garcia Delgado, president of the LMSA community, coordinated the clinic on site.

Andres Bran, an infectious disease expert at MU, oversaw the students’ on-site operations. More than anything, he said he would like to see more people get vaccinated.

“Mostly these are people who have risk factors, diabetes, uncontrolled blood pressure,” Bran said. “These are the people for whom things tend to get worse if they get the flu. The best is prevention. »

Guillen got a flu shot at the clinic on Monday. He said he believed one of the reasons for COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy in the Hispanic community was the lack of information in Spanish about the vaccine.

“But when I see someone who looks like me and speaks the same language, I feel a lot more comfortable saying, ‘Yeah, you should get me vaccinated,'” Bran said. “Usually people believe in those who look like them.”

Erika Hilario, a senior physics student at MU, also got her flu shot on Monday. She grew up translating at the doctor’s office for her father, who is originally from Mexico. Living in rural Sedalia, she said her father preferred to take care of his health in his own way, often self-diagnosing.

11182022-Spanish Clinic

Michelle Gutierrez

/

Missourian

Medical student Ashwin Garlapaty prepares a flu vaccine on Monday at the Centro Latino de Salud in Colombia. Six people came to the free clinic.

“I feel like he would be more comfortable going to something like this event,” Hilario said. “It’s something that I would like to gain more appeal for the community because there are a lot of Latinos here who feel like they don’t get that attention and the kind of respect that they deserve.”

Guillen hopes there will be permanent Spanish-speaking medical care in the area. Orozco said more frequent service is the goal.

Although there is no set date for the next clinic, Delgado said she hopes they will take place at least every few months. Conversations in local public schools to help young people understand health early on are one possibility. The students also want to add mental health and women’s health events in the future.

“We plan to go further down this path than it is now and hopefully reach many more Hispanic communities in Missouri,” Ortiz said.

Meeting patients in the community is an effort that comes with an initiative to train future physicians to better understand the Spanish-speaking communities they may one day serve.

Knock down walls

Several of the students who have volunteered at the community clinic participate in an after-school course that teaches them to perform physical exams in Spanish. Diaz developed the course last year in collaboration with Celso Velazquez, a rheumatologist at MU.

Students who complete the Medical Spanish: Physical Examination course receive a certificate from LMSA and Students Interested in Global Health Tomorrow. Diaz said that after a quick introduction to the uses of medical Spanish, students take six lessons that cover interviewing patients and different aspects of a physical exam. Students work in pairs, using each other to practice skill sets. The course improves their ability to communicate in Spanish, but Diaz said he didn’t expect them to be expert in Spanish after completing the course.

Diaz didn’t expect interest to explode, but it did.

“The course is very basic, but a lot of people are interested,” Bran told Monday’s clinic. “And many students who volunteer here also help other people learn Spanish.”

There are 500 students at MU’s medical school, public information officer Eric Maze confirmed. Diaz said 169 medical school students expressed interest in the course last year. Of the 105 students who took the course, 80 received a certificate of completion.

“It shows you how much students value this course,” Diaz said.

Now the organizers are trying to figure out how they can best move it forward.

This year, they opened the course to pre-med and nursing students, aiming to create opportunities for mentorship and cross-departmental learning. In the future, they hope to have the course taught year-round and bring in community members to help students practice their Spanish with patients.

The process of becoming a Spanish medical interpreter can be long and expensive. According to National Certification Board for Medical Interpreters, applicants must have completed a 40-hour accredited medical interpreter training course or have a college transcript showing three credit hours of medical interpreter coursework. They must also demonstrate oral proficiency in English and Spanish and pass a written and oral exam.

“I would like all students to be certified medical Spanish interpreters by the time they graduate,” Diaz said. “This means that we will probably have to design a more longitudinal course that will be taught by a third party. The problem we are going to encounter is: how are we going to get this funding? »

Michael Hosokawa, senior associate dean for education and faculty development at MU’s medical school, wrote in an email that the medical school supports the interests of its students. Hosokawa added that the dean’s office provides a lump sum to the Medical Student Affairs Council. LMSA could apply for some of the student-run funds. Once qualified, the organization would submit an annual budget request.

11182022-Spanish Clinic

Michelle Gutierrez

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Missourian

Clinic attendees leave the free clinic on Monday at the Centro Latino de Salud in Colombia. This clinic was the first free clinic for Spanish speakers organized by the Association of Latin American Medical Students.

“If students determined that Medical Spanish should be part of the medical student curriculum, they could submit a proposal/rationale to the Program Board for consideration,” Hosokawa wrote in the email. “Such a proposal should include a budget, objectives, assessment and learning strategies, and how such a course fits within the mission of the School of Medicine.”

Another option, Hosokawa added, would be to explore online certificate courses with minimal registration fees or work with other LMSA chapters to develop a learning activity that involves synchronous learning via Zoom. .

If organizers are unable to secure funding through the School of Medicine, Diaz said he will seek out available grant opportunities. But after noticing at a recent LMSA House of Delegates meeting that MU had more students interested in medical Spanish than other universities, he thinks there’s another opportunity there.

“They can be known as one of the best universities in the United States for training Spanish-speaking doctors,” Diaz said.

It is also about improving patient understanding by speaking in their language.

“These walls that are there, they’re falling down,” Diaz said. “You feel this interaction. It is very important because the intimacy of the doctor-patient relationship must be there. You should feel feelings.

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X-Elio activates a 200 MW solar project in Australia – pv magazine International https://disturbmedia.com/x-elio-activates-a-200-mw-solar-project-in-australia-pv-magazine-international/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 07:30:46 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/x-elio-activates-a-200-mw-solar-project-in-australia-pv-magazine-international/ The 200MW Blue Grass solar farm has been officially launched in the Australian state of Queensland, with Spanish developer X-Elio saying the AUD 215 million ($145.3 million) project has reached full commercial operation. November 16, 2022 David Carroll Of american magazine X-Elio has activated its first major project in Australia and its largest to date, […]]]>

The 200MW Blue Grass solar farm has been officially launched in the Australian state of Queensland, with Spanish developer X-Elio saying the AUD 215 million ($145.3 million) project has reached full commercial operation.

Of american magazine

X-Elio has activated its first major project in Australia and its largest to date, with the Spain-based solar developer confirming that the 200MW Blue Grass solar farm near the Queensland town of Chinchilla is now online .

Belinda Fan, country manager for X-Elio in Australia, said the completion of the project strengthens the company’s position in the Australian market. She said he also supported the state government’s recent announcement renewable energy goals generate 70% of its energy needs from renewable sources by 2032 and 80% by 2035.

“The Blue Grass Solar Farm is one of 50 large-scale renewable energy projects in Queensland, coming online at an opportune time to help support the state government’s clean energy ambitions,” a- she declared. “We would like to view this project as a small but important step in the state’s march to net zero.”

The 200 MW solar power plant, located 14 kilometers west of Chinchilla in the planned Darling Downs Renewable Energy Zone (REZ), is expected to supply around 420 GWh of 100% renewable energy per year. This is enough to power 80,000 homes and offset approximately 320,000 tonnes of CO2 emissions.

Electricity generated at the facility will be supplied to the National Electricity Market (NEM) via the existing 132 kV Chinchilla-Columboola transmission line, which is operated by Queensland transmission network provider Powerlink.

The project is backed by power purchase agreements (PPAs) with Queensland government-owned power producer Stanwell, an Australian electricity retailer. ZEN energyand US software company Salesforce. Stanwell signed an agreement with X-Elio for the offtake of 49 MW from the Blue Grass solar park.

Salesforce has signed a deal for 25% of the facility’s output, more than enough renewable energy to match its electricity consumption for all of its Australian operations. The PPA is his first renewable energy offtake agreement and Salesforce Australia and New Zealand CEO Pip Marlow said the launch of the Blue Grass Solar Farm is a milestone in the company’s sustainability journey,

“Salesforce has zero net residual emissions and achieved 100% renewable energy for its global operations in 2021,” she said. “Projects like Blue Grass Solar Farm are essential to our vision of a net zero world.”

X-Elio CEO Lluis Noguera said the Blue Grass solar farm marks the opening phase of the company’s long-term interest in the Australian market, where it continues to seek new growth opportunities.

“Australia is a key strategic market for X-Elio and our Blue Grass solar park will spearhead our continued expansion along Australia’s east coast, with additional projects planned for New Wales. South and Victoria,” he said.

X-Elio has announced its intention to build a 300 MW solar farm and a battery energy storage system near Wagga Wagga, New South Wales. The 120MW Forest Glen and 80MW Wunghnu solar farms in New South Wales and Victoria, respectively, are also among more than 500MW of projects X-Elio has under development in Australia.

This content is copyrighted and may not be reused. If you wish to cooperate with us and wish to reuse some of our content, please contact: editors@pv-magazine.com.

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Lancaster initiative seeks to connect with Spanish-speaking residents | Tri-State News https://disturbmedia.com/lancaster-initiative-seeks-to-connect-with-spanish-speaking-residents-tri-state-news/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/lancaster-initiative-seeks-to-connect-with-spanish-speaking-residents-tri-state-news/ Country the United States of AmericaUS Virgin IslandsU.S. Minor Outlying IslandsCanadaMexico, United Mexican StatesBahamas, Commonwealth ofCuba, Republic ofDominican RepublicHaiti, Republic ofJamaicaAfghanistanAlbania, People’s Socialist Republic ofAlgeria, People’s Democratic Republic ofAmerican SamoaAndorra, Principality ofAngola, Republic ofAnguillaAntarctica (the territory south of 60 degrees S)Antigua and BarbudaArgentina, Argentine RepublicArmeniaArubaAustralia, Commonwealth ofAustria, Republic ofAzerbaijan, Republic ofBahrain, Kingdom ofBangladesh, People’s Republic […]]]>

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Spanish coin surfaces on Brevard County beach after Hurricane Nicole https://disturbmedia.com/spanish-coin-surfaces-on-brevard-county-beach-after-hurricane-nicole/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 19:50:14 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/spanish-coin-surfaces-on-brevard-county-beach-after-hurricane-nicole/ BONSTEEL PARK, Florida. – In the world of TV news, you never know when you’re going to stumble upon an unexpected story (it actually goes with the territory). Such was the case Thursday morning when News 6 reporter James Sparvero was on his way from one Nicole story to another. He passed a group of […]]]>

BONSTEEL PARK, Florida. – In the world of TV news, you never know when you’re going to stumble upon an unexpected story (it actually goes with the territory).

Such was the case Thursday morning when News 6 reporter James Sparvero was on his way from one Nicole story to another. He passed a group of people walking on Bonsteel Park Beach about 2 miles north of Sebastian Inlet. The group, armed with metal detectors, were treasure hunters looking for anything uncovered by the hurricane’s strong winds and beach erosion.

[TRENDING: Beachside Wilbur-by-the-Sea home teeters on edge as Nicole devours Florida shore | Nicole becomes 3rd hurricane ever to hit Florida in November | Become a News 6 Insider]

And, you guessed it, at least one person thinks he’s grown up.

The image below shows an inauspicious piece of blackish-green metal that could be an old Spanish coin worth around $400. And oddly enough, coins from this vintage are worth more in their natural state than cleaned.

Spanish coin surfaces on Brevard County beach (Copyright 2022 by WKMG ClickOrlando – All rights reserved.)

But where does this piece come from? Is the east coast of Florida a secret haven for Spanish plunder?

Why yes it is.

James and the Unnamed Treasure Hunter think that Nicole may have caused enough beach erosion to help anyone with patience and a decent metal detector find remnants of 18th century shipwrecks. Specifically, treasure hunters in this part of the state are still on the hunt for coins and jewelry from ships from 1715 (and to a lesser extent, 1733).

On On July 31, 1715, a flotilla of Spanish ships ran into a hurricane off the east coast of Florida.

The Treasure Fleet or Plate Fleet of 1715 (plate comes from the Spanish word plata which translates into English as the word silver) had left Cuba to return to Europe laden with gold, silver, tobacco and other wealth of the New World. Eleven of the 12 ships were lost at sea; the 12th ship, a French warship named Le Griffon, returned to Europe because the captain sailed through the storm rather than letting the storm push his ship ashore.

Eighteen years later, another fleet of Spanish ships sank in a similar location.

Although the Spanish were able to salvage some of their precious cargo, the two wrecks were largely forgotten for the next two centuries until a group of men discovered 3,500–4,000 silver coins on January 8, 1961, in what became known as Cabin Wreck. The men had previously formed a society known as the The Real Eight Company, Inc. and they are generally credited with starting the modern scavenger hunt on Florida’s east coast.

But even with the great transport of the Real Eight and others since, people continue to seek more Spanish riches, coins and jewelry that could be worth billions.

Of the eleven ships that sank in 1715, only seven have been recovered. One of 1715 ships found, the Urca of Lima, which was discovered in 1928, is protected as a Florida Underwater Archaeological Preserve (a 1733 ship named the San-Pedro is also protected). Still missing from 1715 are the Santa Rita y Animas, the Maria Galante, the El Señor San Miguel and the El Ciervo.

The Maria Galante and the Sana Rita y Animas are thought to be somewhere off Cape Canaveral. Historians believe, however, that the El Señor San Miguel and the El Ciervo could be as far north of Brevard County as Amelia Island (near the Florida-Georgia border).

With four ships still waiting to be found and an unknown amount of gold and silver still buried near the Florida coast, treasure hunters armed with metal detectors will continue to roam the beaches, especially after the Atlantic coast hurricanes.

You can listen to every episode of Florida’s Fourth Estate in the media player below:

Copyright 2022 by WKMG ClickOrlando – All Rights Reserved.

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Jill Biden says ‘the election is going to be won or lost by where the vote falls on your to-do list’ https://disturbmedia.com/jill-biden-says-the-election-is-going-to-be-won-or-lost-by-where-the-vote-falls-on-your-to-do-list/ Wed, 02 Nov 2022 22:24:30 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/jill-biden-says-the-election-is-going-to-be-won-or-lost-by-where-the-vote-falls-on-your-to-do-list/ On Wednesday, First Lady Jill Biden joined Pennsylvania Democrats in Pittsburgh with the American Federation of Teachers, telling attendees at a vote rally that the election will end in small moments of action. “This election is going to be won or lost by where the vote lands on your to-do list,” she said, addressing teachers […]]]>

On Wednesday, First Lady Jill Biden joined Pennsylvania Democrats in Pittsburgh with the American Federation of Teachers, telling attendees at a vote rally that the election will end in small moments of action.

“This election is going to be won or lost by where the vote lands on your to-do list,” she said, addressing teachers and students.

Biden, a community college educator, joined Allegheny County lawmakers and teachers on a 20-day bus tour to mobilize voters ahead of the Nov. 8 general election and encourage people to vote for Democratic candidates in Pennsylvania.

The rally focused on investing in education and warned against electing politicians who support banning school books, increasing corporate tax cuts and attacks on unions .

AFT chairman Randi Weingarten said the choices on the ballot represent people trying to solve problems and the “problems”.

“While every election is important, you all know that midterm it could really come down to a handful of votes,” Biden said.

In his remarks, Biden said the election presents voters with a choice between “two radically different visions of our future.”

In one, voters could build on what she called “historic progress” by electing state Rep. Summer Lee, D-Allegheny and Chris Deluzio to two open seats in Congress from the west. of Pennsylvania.

She warned that more Republicans in power could put unions at risk, saying the GOP was “putting Social Security and Medicaid on the chopping block” and trying to pass a nationwide ban on abortion.

“This election is going to be all about those little moments,” she said. “A ballot cast, a phone call to a neighbor who may have forgotten to vote, a trip offered to the polling station. Again and again, these small actions add up to something much bigger than anything we can do alone. It starts with you. It starts with each of us digging a little deeper, working a little harder, and believing that together, yes, we will win.

Rob Mitchell, a Spanish teacher at Westinghouse Academy, encouraged voters to elect Democrats Josh Shapiro and Austin Davis as governor and lieutenant governor, respectively. He also promoted Mandy Steele and Arvind Venkat, candidates for the state House of Representatives, and Senator Lindsey Williams, D-Allegheny, who is seeking re-election.

“If they win, we win. Pennsylvania wins. America wins,” Mitchell said, adding that voters should elect candidates who “protect” democracy, the right to vote, public schools and health care. health.

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Spanish unions are trying to strangle the growing wave of strikes https://disturbmedia.com/spanish-unions-are-trying-to-strangle-the-growing-wave-of-strikes/ Sun, 30 Oct 2022 23:36:39 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/spanish-unions-are-trying-to-strangle-the-growing-wave-of-strikes/ Spain’s trade union bureaucracies are scrambling to end a wave of strikes amid growing working class opposition to the Socialist Party (PSOE)-Podemos government and the US-NATO war on Russia in Ukraine. Last week, the USO union called off its baggage handlers’ strike, demanding better conditions, against low-cost airline Ryanair at 22 Spanish airports. The USO […]]]>

Spain’s trade union bureaucracies are scrambling to end a wave of strikes amid growing working class opposition to the Socialist Party (PSOE)-Podemos government and the US-NATO war on Russia in Ukraine.

Last week, the USO union called off its baggage handlers’ strike, demanding better conditions, against low-cost airline Ryanair at 22 Spanish airports. The USO claimed that the minimum service requirements of the PSOE-Podemos Department of Transport “made it impossible for workers to carry out the strike”, adding that they are “abusive and clearly detrimental to the exercise of the right to strike. , making it absolutely unfeasible”. .”

Accepting the decision of Spain’s major union bureaucracies to isolate the strike and bring in other sections of workers to defend the baggage handlers, the USO offered to challenge only the minimum service demands in court. The USO’s capitulation comes amid a wave of struggles that have rocked the European airline industry this year, including Ryanair, Iberia Express, EasyJet, Lufthansa, Air France and SAS. He also worked to prevent the link between the baggage handlers’ struggle and the flight attendants’ strike called by the STAVLA union.

Flight attendant strikes are scheduled for every Friday, Sunday and Monday between November 1 and January 31. Workers are demanding a 13.4% wage increase for this year. Previously, the Stalinist Workers’ Commissions (CCOO) tried to end the strike by agreeing to a 6.5% increase in August, despite inflation already at 9% or more.

Growing anger forced STAVLA to refuse to sign and to call a strike. Once again, the PSOE-Podemos government has imposed a minimum service requirement that workers must work 50-80% of normal hours to break the strike. STAVLA has not yet denounced these measures and will most likely accept them as USO.

The UGT, CCOO and SEMAF unions also called off a strike by 15,000 railway workers on Spain’s rail network, Renfe, which was due to start on Friday. A strike has been called over the company’s offer of a 2% pay rise, the lack of trains, the lack of drivers and fears that Renfe will transfer its powers to regions of the country, opening up the way to a further deterioration of the public rail system.

The unions called off the strike after Renfe agreed to wage increases announced in the latest PSOE-Podemos budget. The budget includes below-inflation increases for civil servants like railway workers of 3.5% for 2022 and 2023 and 2.5% in 2024. This was cynically celebrated as a “victory” by unions, as this actually means that 3.5 million civil servants will see a collapse in real wages and purchasing power.

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HSI Tampa fraud mission awarded by Attorney General https://disturbmedia.com/hsi-tampa-fraud-mission-awarded-by-attorney-general/ Tue, 25 Oct 2022 13:50:56 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/hsi-tampa-fraud-mission-awarded-by-attorney-general/ TAMPA, Fla. — A Tampa Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) task force was honored at the 69th Annual Attorney General’s Awards earlier this year. United States Attorney General Merrick B. Garland acknowledged those who “selflessly served to advance the [Department of Homeland Security’s] important work to uphold the rule of law, keep our country safe and […]]]>

TAMPA, Fla. — A Tampa Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) task force was honored at the 69th Annual Attorney General’s Awards earlier this year. United States Attorney General Merrick B. Garland acknowledged those who “selflessly served to advance the [Department of Homeland Security’s] important work to uphold the rule of law, keep our country safe and protect civil rights.

The Attorney General’s Award for Fraud Prevention recognizes exceptional dedication and effort to prevent, investigate and prosecute fraud, white collar crime and official corruption. For their skill, professionalism and dedication, an HSI Tampa Mission Benefits Fraud Task Force has been recognized for their efforts to protect the integrity of the nation’s immigration system by disrupting and preventing fraud to obtain illegal immigration benefits.

Special Agents Kristy Anderson, Alvis Lockart, and Yenixa Perez, along with Task Force Officer Ryan Doherty and Assistant U.S. Attorney Francis D. Murray were recently recognized for “extraordinary leadership and substantial contributions to the ongoing efforts of the Department of Justice to eradicate and deter”. fraud against immigrants in our community.

Starting in 2018, this multi-agency team investigated and prosecuted a series of cases involving fraudulent schemes where individuals posed as immigration lawyers and targeted undocumented immigrants from Spanish-speaking countries seeking driver’s licenses. and work permits in Florida. In total, these schemes claimed at least 359 victims, most of whom were from Central and South American countries. Expected losses exceeded $1.23 million.

“Immigrants, especially those whose legal status is in question, are among the most vulnerable people in our society,” Anderson said. “‘Notario’ frauds and other impersonator-attorney frauds targeting immigrants are an epidemic in the Central District of Florida and throughout our country.”

The first of these lawsuits was United States v. Erika Intriago. Intriago falsely marketed itself as a licensed immigration attorney and, at times, a “notary” for Spanish-speaking immigrants. These immigrants paid her to represent them in immigration proceedings before the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS).

However, Intriago has never filed its client-victims’ claims, dropped their claims, or notified its clients that their claims have been denied. To cover up and perpetuate his scheme, Intriago forged letters and other correspondence from the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and USCIS.

“To make matters worse, she manipulated her victims into threatening to report their immigration status to authorities when they confronted her,” Andersen said. “Victims of Intraigo suffered severe financial hardship and adverse consequences on their immigration status.”

In 2020, Intriago pleaded guilty to wire fraud. She was sentenced to two years in prison and was ordered to pay $61,013 in restitution to 60 known victims. The Intriago team consisted of AUSA Murray, TFO Doherty and SA Anderson.

The second lawsuit was United States v Roberta Guedes. In 2014, Guedes graduated from law school but failed the Florida bar exam twice. Undeterred, she incorporated two bogus law firms, marketed her legal services, and rented office space across from the U.S. Attorney’s office. Guedes charged his client-victims, mostly immigrants, fees for legal services ranging from immigration to family law cases.

“Guedes misrepresented herself as a lawyer and posed as a former law school classmate and licensed attorney,” Perez said. Guedes filed immigration pleadings and petitions using this classmate’s name and bar number and made several personal appearances in immigration and state court. As the Florida Bar investigated his conduct, Guedes forged a third-party affidavit to undermine and discredit that investigation.

Guedes pleaded guilty to mail fraud and aggravated impersonation. In 2020, she was sentenced to 4.5 years in prison and ordered to pay $14,318 in restitution.

The third lawsuit was United States v. Elvis Reyes. Reyes falsely posed as an immigration attorney to target undocumented immigrants from Spanish-speaking countries seeking driver’s licenses and work authorization in Florida. Reyes gave his clients inaccurate and incomplete legal and immigration advice to get them to retain his services.

He then filed fraudulent immigration applications on behalf of the client-victims, seeking asylum and the denial of removal protections provided by the United Nations Convention Against Torture.

“Unbeknownst to the client-victims, Reyes falsified information in the applications — fabricating stories about applicants’ threats, persecution and fears of returning to their home countries,” Doherty said. “He failed to inform victims of the legal, administrative and immigration consequences that could arise from a refused asylum application, such as an immediate removal procedure.

In total, his scheme resulted in approximately 292 casualties with expected losses exceeding $1.1 million. In December 2020, Reyes pleaded guilty to mail fraud and aggravated identity theft. On April 12, 2021, he was sentenced to 20 years and nine months in prison.

“These criminals defrauded hundreds of victims who thought they were starting a path to legal citizenship,” said John Condon, Special Agent in Charge of HSI Tampa. “Identity and benefits fraud is a crime that threatens national security and the public safety of the United States by creating vulnerabilities in our legal immigration system. Thanks to HSI Special Agents and our exceptional partnership with law enforcement in the area, they were held accountable for their crimes. This is what we do.

All three lawsuits received extensive coverage in English and Spanish media, as well as legal outlets like Law360.

“The high-profile nature of the prosecutions had immense deterrent value and helped bridge a gap between law enforcement and vulnerable immigrants in our community,” Anderson said. “Media coverage has also encouraged immigrant victims in Florida to report similar crimes to law enforcement, helping to bridge the gap between law enforcement and a more isolated, suspicious and vulnerable population in our community.”

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Old Sugar Mill Pancake House opens in De Leon Springs State Park https://disturbmedia.com/old-sugar-mill-pancake-house-opens-in-de-leon-springs-state-park/ Tue, 18 Oct 2022 17:46:23 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/old-sugar-mill-pancake-house-opens-in-de-leon-springs-state-park/ DE LEON SPRINGS, Florida. – Guests visiting De Leon Springs State Park can once again make their own pancakes. The Old Sugar Mill creperie opened on Monday. [TRENDING: Cooler weather on the way. Here’s how low temps will go | Orlando FreeFall will be torn down. Here’s what we know about the timeline | Become […]]]>

DE LEON SPRINGS, Florida. – Guests visiting De Leon Springs State Park can once again make their own pancakes.

The Old Sugar Mill creperie opened on Monday.

[TRENDING: Cooler weather on the way. Here’s how low temps will go | Orlando FreeFall will be torn down. Here’s what we know about the timeline | Become a News 6 Insider]

In a Facebook post, the new seller said, “The old Sugar Mill Creperie at De Leon Springs State Park is now officially open! Come join us for some breakfast favorites like classic French toast, all-you-can-eat build-your-own pancakes and more! We look forward to seeing you here!”

The previous owners operated the breakfast restaurant, formerly called the Old Spanish Sugar Mill for 61 years before closing doors in September.

“We have been fortunate to serve as a base in Central Florida since 1961,” the owner of Old Spanish Sugar Mill wrote on Facebook. “We sincerely thank you for making us your ‘go-to’ when you have company or crave chocolate chip pancakes. Thank you again for sharing those memories with us. The Sugar Mill was without a doubt the coolest breakfast restaurant in America.

John Michaelos, owner of the Old Spanish Sugar Mill restaurant, said he submitted a bid to keep the business going but was outbid by another concessionaire.

According to the Department of Environmental Protection, which oversees state parks, Guest Services, Inc., has taken over as the new concessionaire for De Leon Springs State Park, although the plant itself- even will remain.

“It’s been kind of a soft opening right now, since yesterday. We’re heading into our grand opening, which will be in early November,” said Matthew Smith, district manager of Guest Services, Inc.

Smith said there had been a slight renovation, with new tables built and others brought in.

“It looks a little different. Everything still works the same way. Same size griddle, same syrup, same honey, same molasses, all of it. The table is bigger, so you have more space to enjoy your meal,” Smith said. “It kind of gives you the dining experience of more people in a family style.”

Ruthie Valeri visited the restaurant in Davenport with her husband.

“I thought it was so cool. It’s wonderful. It’s beautiful. He made his own breakfast. How much better does it get than that?” Valeri said.

“The restaurant’s famous bake-your-own pancakes will still be available in the authentic sugar mill building overlooking one of Florida’s most beautiful natural settings,” the Department of Environmental Protection said in a statement later. early this year.

The restaurant offers breakfast favorites, unlimited build-your-own pancakes, and more.


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Hispanic Heritage Month Presentation: Carlos Cañas Dinarte https://disturbmedia.com/hispanic-heritage-month-presentation-carlos-canas-dinarte/ Sat, 15 Oct 2022 20:24:47 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/hispanic-heritage-month-presentation-carlos-canas-dinarte/ October 17, 2022 15:00 About this event The Humanities Institute of the Mississippi State College of Arts and Sciences and the IDEA (Inclusion, Diversity, Equity and Awareness) committee will co-host Carlos Cañas Dinarte, the deputy director of the Academia de Historia (National Academy of History) of El Salvador for a special Hispanic Heritage Month presentation […]]]>


October 17, 2022

15:00


About this event

The Humanities Institute of the Mississippi State College of Arts and Sciences and the IDEA (Inclusion, Diversity, Equity and Awareness) committee will co-host Carlos Cañas Dinarte, the deputy director of the Academia de Historia (National Academy of History) of El Salvador for a special Hispanic Heritage Month presentation titled “Luis de Moscoso y Alvarado: desde San Miguel de la Frontera hasta el río Mississippi (Luis de Moscoso y Alvarado: From San Miguel de la Frontera to the Mississippi River)” .

One of the most important expeditions to the South was led by Hernando de Soto and his second in command Luis de Moscoso y Alvarado. While history textbooks have often denied the Spanish presence in the 16th century, Dinarte’s account aims to draw connections between these expeditions and Spanish involvement in Central America.

The in-person discussion is scheduled for 3 p.m. Monday [Oct. 17] in room 2180 of the Old Main Academic Center. You can also visit https://www.facebook.com/msu.humanities.institute at that time for a virtual option.

For more information, contact Melanie Loehwing, acting director of the Institute for the Humanities, at 662-325-8264.

Details

Location

Room 2180, former main university center; virtual

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