Spanish state – Disturb Media http://disturbmedia.com/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 20:40:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://disturbmedia.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-6-120x120.png Spanish state – Disturb Media http://disturbmedia.com/ 32 32 EU diplomat warns Paraguay it must avoid becoming a narco-state — MercoPress https://disturbmedia.com/eu-diplomat-warns-paraguay-it-must-avoid-becoming-a-narco-state-mercopress/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 20:40:00 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/eu-diplomat-warns-paraguay-it-must-avoid-becoming-a-narco-state-mercopress/ EU diplomat warns Paraguay must avoid becoming a narco-state Monday, June 20, 2022 – 20:40 UTC Looking to the future, Paraguay has green and surplus energy, added García de Viedma The European Union ambassador to Asunción said on Monday he fears Paraguay could turn into a narco-state if proper measures are not taken. […]]]>

EU diplomat warns Paraguay must avoid becoming a narco-state

Monday, June 20, 2022 – 20:40 UTC



Looking to the future, Paraguay has green and surplus energy, added García de Viedma

The European Union ambassador to Asunción said on Monday he fears Paraguay could turn into a narco-state if proper measures are not taken.

“Some people are probably exaggerating when they say Paraguay is a narco-state. I think these are exaggerations, but I think it is important to bear in mind that this long-term possibility cannot be ruled out if the necessary and timely measures are not taken, ”said Javier García de Viedma in a radio interview.

He added that when he arrived in the country less than a year ago, one of the issues that caught his attention was the weight of organized crime in the daily life of Paraguay.

“Basically, since the San Bernardino attack, I had the impression that a red line had been crossed and that there was a message from organized crime. Is there a risk ? Yes, there is a risk, but there are also measures, programs, collaborations, not only from the European Union, but also from other countries, and there are very worthy people with great determination to put an end to it. Risks, yes, but also the means and the will,” said the Spanish diplomat.

García de Viedma recalled that the largest shipment of cocaine seized in Europe, 23 tons, came from Paraguay.

“Paraguay is becoming a transit point (for drugs). We have known this for some time and we have to fight against this and the Paraguayan authorities are doing this and we are also helping to make it as effective as possible,” he also explained.

Since organized crime is transnational in nature, the type of cooperation carried out by the EU is regional and not bilateral, also underlined García de Viedma while highlighting three European programs dedicated to this issue; namely the Latin America, Caribbean and EU Cooperation Program on Drug Policy (Copolad), the Assistance Program against Transnational Organized Crime (PACCTO) and the Eurofront, which works specifically on cross-border trafficking.

“Organized crime is of such a nature that it does not seek to create a state. If organized crime was considering having a state in a remote part of Asia, Africa or Latin America, it would be relatively easy to fight it,” García de Viedma also pointed out.

“Organized crime works in such a way that it prefers to control the levers of the state, manipulate the strings so that the state becomes the theater” where crime goes unpunished”, added the ambassador.

“Paraguay had sustained growth before the pandemic, between 4 and 5% for some time. Over a period of more than ten years, it changes the country,” he also said.

“On the other hand, Paraguay has something that belongs to the future, which many countries are fighting for and which is expensive to obtain, which is green and surplus energy. This makes it an additional element to favor investment,” he added.

(Source: Ultima Hora)

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The captive genízaros were the other indigenous peoples of New Mexico | Local News https://disturbmedia.com/the-captive-genizaros-were-the-other-indigenous-peoples-of-new-mexico-local-news/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 04:30:00 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/the-captive-genizaros-were-the-other-indigenous-peoples-of-new-mexico-local-news/ Country the United States of AmericaUS Virgin IslandsU.S. Minor Outlying IslandsCanadaMexico, United Mexican StatesBahamas, Commonwealth ofCuba, Republic ofDominican RepublicHaiti, Republic ofJamaicaAfghanistanAlbania, People’s Socialist Republic ofAlgeria, People’s Democratic Republic ofAmerican SamoaAndorra, Principality ofAngola, Republic ofAnguillaAntarctica (the territory south of 60 degrees S)Antigua and BarbudaArgentina, Argentine RepublicArmeniaArubaAustralia, Commonwealth ofAustria, Republic ofAzerbaijan, Republic ofBahrain, Kingdom ofBangladesh, People’s Republic […]]]>

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The 2022 GameTimeCT All-State Women’s Golf Team https://disturbmedia.com/the-2022-gametimect-all-state-womens-golf-team/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 16:07:18 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/the-2022-gametimect-all-state-womens-golf-team/ Golfer of the Year Libby Dunn Berlin, junior Statistics: Posted a 79 at the Black Hall Club to tie for first place at the State Open, giving him back-to-back titles. Shot 80 at the Timberlin GC to share medal laurels with teammate Kenna Roman in the Division II State Championship meet. It also helped Berlin […]]]>

Golfer of the Year

Libby Dunn

Berlin, junior

Statistics: Posted a 79 at the Black Hall Club to tie for first place at the State Open, giving him back-to-back titles. Shot 80 at the Timberlin GC to share medal laurels with teammate Kenna Roman in the Division II State Championship meet. It also helped Berlin win the Tag Team Championship. Placed third in CCC Championship encounter (79). Finished with a differential of 4.37 strokes.

Honors: Twice All-CCC, All-State GameTimeCT and All-State Coach Selection.

Off course: High Honor Roll Student each term, member of UpBeat, a community service group, the Unity team, the School Advisory Board, the National Honor Society, and the Rho Kappa National Social Studies Honor Society. Also volunteer at the First Tee of Connecticut.

♦♦♦

Aifé Devaney

Waterbury Co-op, Year Two

Statistics: Shot a 76 of 4 over par to finish second to Molly Mitchell in CIAC Division I State Championship competition. Shot 81 at the State Open to place fourth. Finished with a 6.3 stroke differential. Record a hole-in-one this season.

Honors: Twice NVL Brass Division and All-State Select Coaches.

Off course: 2nd COLT Poetry Competition in Chinese HS2, Eagles Business Award Winner.

♦♦♦

Anna DeSanto

Hall, second year

Statistics: Finished with a leading 2.5 stroke differential. Shot 82 tied for 10th in the CIAC Division I State Championship game held at Tashua Knolls GC. Shot 81 at the State Open, held at the Black Hall Club, to place fourth. Helped lead Hall to Division I state title in 2021. Placed second in CCC Tournament with a 78. Set school record shooting a 35 at home, Rockledge GC

Honors: Two-time GameTimeCT All-State and All-CCC first-team selection.

Off course: CIAC All-Academic Pick. Member of the West Hartford Camerata (viola) and the National Spanish Honor Society. Accepted in Solisti (alto).

♦♦♦

Samantha Dunn

Berlin, first year

Statistics: Shot 84 at Timberlin GC to place third in Division II State Championship meet. Shot an 85 at the State Open to tie for seventh place. Ranked fifth in the CCC meet with an 83. Finished with a 5.45 stroke differential.

Honors: All-CCC and All-State Coaches Selection.

Off course: High Honor Roll Student of all four terms, member of UpBeat, a community service group, the Unity team, and the school advisory committee. Also volunteer at the First Tee of Connecticut.

♦♦♦

Ava Gross

friendship, senior

Statistics: SCC Championship Medalist, shooting a 78 at Oronoque CC. Shot 78 at Tashua Knolls to finish fourth in the ACIC Division I State Championship. Tied for seventh at the State Open, shooting an 85. Finished with a 5.66 shot differential.

Honors: Twice All-SCC, GameTimeCT All-State and All-State Coach Selection.

Off course: Class President, member of the National Honor Society, the French National Honor Society and the English National Honor Society.

Next: Will be attending William & Mary in the fall.

♦♦♦

Sidney Hidalgo

Cheshire, junior

Statistics: Shot 80 at the State Open to place third. Shot 90 to place third in the SCC Championship Meet. Shot 85 to tie for 12th in the ACIC Division I State Championship game. Had a differential of 6.33 strokes.

Honors: Select all SCC.

♦♦♦

Anna Lemcke

Staples, senior

Statistics: His 79 at the Black Hall Club was good enough for a tie for first place at the State Open. Shot 84 at the Fairchild Wheeler Black Course to place second at the FCIAC meet. Tied for eighth in the CIAC Division I State Championship meet with an 81 at Tashua Knolls GC, finished with a 5.41 stroke differential.

Honors: All FCICAC selection. GameTimeCT 2021 All-State Second Team Pick. Two-time All-FCIAC and State Coaches selection.

Off course: Member of National Honor Society, German National Honors Society, Spanish National Honors Society, German Club President, Member of Girls Can Code, Young Democrats Club and Culinary Clubs; volunteer for OTA – a non-profit organization that helps improve the lives of children in Camaroon, Africa through tennis.

Next: Will compete in St. Andrews in Scotland.

♦♦♦

Molly Mitchell

New Canaan, senior

Statistics: Won the CIAC Division I State Championship encounter with a 75 of 3 over par at Tashua Knolls GC, helping New Canaan win the Tag Team Championship. Shot 88 at the Fairchild Wheeler Black Course to place fifth at the FCIAC meet and help New Canaan claim their fifth consecutive league crown. Finished with a 5.04 stroke differential.

Honors: Two-time FCIAC Player of the Year, All-FCIAC and All-State Coaches’ Selection.

Off course: Captain of the field hockey team, helping lead the Rams to the state championship.

Next: Will be playing field hockey in Colby in the fall.

♦♦♦

Laniah Moffett

Waterbury Co-op, Year Two

Statistics: Finished with a 3.8 stroke differential. Shot 77 at Tashua Knolls GC to place third at the CIAC Division I State Championship meet, Shot 92 at the State Open.

Honors: Causes all states to be selected. GameTimeCT 2021 All-State Second Team Pick.

♦♦♦

Morgan Peterson

Glastonbury, senior

Statistics: Finished with a 2.85 stroke differential. Shot 79 tied for fifth in the CIAC Division I State Championship game held at Tashua Knolls GC. Placed fifth at State Open, shooting an 82 at Black Hall Club. Medalist at the CCC tournament (77).

Honors: Twice All-CCC selection. Selection of state coaches. GameTimeCT 2021 All-State Second Team Pick.

Off course: Member of the World Language Honor Society, DECA (business club), Yearbook Club and Host Club (welcome committee).

♦♦♦

Kendall Roseau

Newtown, senior

Statistics: Defended his title in the SWC Championship Meet. Shot 90 at the State Open to tie for 11th. Turned 86 to the CIAC division that I meet. Had a differential of 6.14 strokes.

Honors: Two-time All-SWC selection. Coaches from all states choose.

Off course: Member of the National Honor Society, Link Crew and Class Council. Also played basketball.

Next: Will be golfing at Bates next season.

♦♦♦

Kenna Roman

Berlin, junior

Statistics: Shot 80 at the Timberlin GC to share medal laurels with teammate Libby Dunn in the Division II State Championship meet. Placed fourth at CCC meet with an 81. Shot an 86 at the State Open to finish 10th. Finished with a 3.4-stroke differential.

Honors: All-CCC selection.

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ECB promises new crisis tool to help indebted southern states https://disturbmedia.com/ecb-promises-new-crisis-tool-to-help-indebted-southern-states/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 15:04:00 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/ecb-promises-new-crisis-tool-to-help-indebted-southern-states/ Focus reinvestments on highly indebted members Design a new tool The disappointed markets Lagarde will speak at 4:20 p.m. GMT FRANKFURT/MILAN, June 15 (Reuters) – The European Central Bank pledged fresh support on Wednesday to temper a market rout that stoked fears of another debt crisis on the euro zone’s southern shore, but appears disappointed […]]]>
  • Focus reinvestments on highly indebted members
  • Design a new tool
  • The disappointed markets
  • Lagarde will speak at 4:20 p.m. GMT

FRANKFURT/MILAN, June 15 (Reuters) – The European Central Bank pledged fresh support on Wednesday to temper a market rout that stoked fears of another debt crisis on the euro zone’s southern shore, but appears disappointed investors looking for bolder moves.

Government borrowing costs have soared on the periphery of the 19-nation currency bloc since the ECB unveiled plans last Thursday to raise interest rates to tame painfully high inflation that threatens to take root .

The sell-off was then exacerbated by the ECB’s vague pledge to limit rising borrowing costs, raising fears that policymakers could abandon the most indebted countries, such as Italy, Spain and Greece.

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Anxious to avoid a repeat of the debt crisis that nearly brought down the single currency a decade ago, the ECB backtracked just six days later, unveiling plans for a new support program and directing the maturing debt cash 1.7 trillion euro ($1.8 trillion) pandemic support program for indebted countries.

“The Governing Council has decided to mandate the relevant Eurosystem committees as well as ECB staff to expedite the completion of the design of a new anti-fragmentation instrument for consideration by the Governing Council,” said the ECB following an extraordinary meeting.

Speaking at a conference on Wednesday, Dutch central bank chief Klaas Knot said policymakers had instructed staff to work at an accelerated pace on the new tool, in case sending reinvestments south wouldn’t be enough.

“If that’s not enough, rest assured we’re ready,” Knot said.

His Slovak counterpart, Peter Kazimir, said it was still “premature” to discuss details of what a new tool would look like.

THE BARE MINIMUM?

Investors welcomed the ECB’s intentions but were still disappointed by the lack of details and the absence of a firm commitment.

“I think it’s basically the bare minimum of what one would expect, but I also think it’s the most realistic outcome of what they could compromise today,” said Piet Christiansen. , an economist at Danske Bank.

He added that asking staff to come up with a plan also gave decision makers some time to see how the market would settle on its own.

But the announcement also drew fire from those who argued the ECB was in danger of going too far.

“The job of the ECB is to guarantee price stability, not to ensure favorable financing conditions,” said Markus Ferber, a member of the European Parliament. “Some countries are now simply bearing the brunt of years of irresponsible fiscal policies.”

“If the ECB now launches another program to keep spreads low, it is getting dangerously close to (the) monetary financing of the state,” Ferber said.

The euro fell about 0.5% against the dollar after the ECB statement, but Italian yields eased about 2 basis points after a brief rally.

The spread between Italian and German 10-year bonds, a key indicator, meanwhile widened to 241 basis points immediately after the announcement, but then fell back to 226 basis points, indicating confidence that the ECB will act more decisively, perhaps at the July 21 policy meeting, when it is almost certain to raise rates for the first time in more than a decade.

The ECB’s move comes on the same day the US Federal Reserve is expected to raise interest rates, with investors dramatically upping their bets for a 75 basis point hike, a shift in expectations that fueled a sharp sell-off in markets global. Read more

Italian spreads peaked at around 250 basis points on Tuesday, their highest since early 2014 raising fears that Italy’s high debt levels could become unsustainable.

There is no universally accepted level for this spread, but Carlo Messina, the CEO of Intesa, Italy’s largest bank, said earlier on Wednesday that the country’s economic fundamentals would justify 100 to 150 basis points. .

The spread on Spanish 10-year bonds meanwhile widened to 128 basis points after the ECB announcement of around 125, while for Greece it widened to 269 basis points from around 260.

ECB President Christine Lagarde is due to speak at 4.20pm GMT in London at an earlier scheduled engagement.

($1 = 0.9542 euros)

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Reporting by Balazs Koranyi, Francesco Canepa and Frank Siebelt; Editing by Jacqueline Wong, Sam Holmes, Carmel Crimmins and Tomasz Janowski

Our standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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Lawmakers blast DPS for Uvalde’s English-only filming updates https://disturbmedia.com/lawmakers-blast-dps-for-uvaldes-english-only-filming-updates/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 15:56:36 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/lawmakers-blast-dps-for-uvaldes-english-only-filming-updates/ Hispanic members of Congress are demanding that the Texas Department of Public Safety also provide information related to the May 24 mass shooting at Robb Elementary School in Spanish. In a letter Sent to director Steven McCraw on Friday, House Democrats, including San Antonio Rep. Joaquin Castro, lambasted the agency for releasing most news and […]]]>

Hispanic members of Congress are demanding that the Texas Department of Public Safety also provide information related to the May 24 mass shooting at Robb Elementary School in Spanish.

In a letter Sent to director Steven McCraw on Friday, House Democrats, including San Antonio Rep. Joaquin Castro, lambasted the agency for releasing most news and press briefings after the Robb Elementary School shooting only in English. Uvalde’s population is 81% Hispanic, with more than half of people speaking a language other than English at home, according to the American census.

you might also like: Uvalde native Matthew McConaughey reacts to Senate gun safety deal

“It is unconscionable that public safety officials are failing to provide essential information in Spanish to a predominantly Spanish-speaking community,” the lawmakers said in the letter.

Other lawmakers who signed the letter include Raúl M. Grijalva, of Tucson, Arizona, Norma Torres, of Ontario, California, Jesús “Chuy” García, of Chicago, and Veronica Escobar, of El Paso, Texas. Tony Gonzales, who represents Uvalde, did not sign the letter.

“The people of Uvalde have a right to know all the information about the horrific shooting that took place at Robb Elementary, and those whose first language is Spanish cannot continue to be ignored,” Torres said. in a tweet In Monday.

At a press conference on May 26 after the Uvalde massacre, journalists can be heard ask DPS officials for updates in Spanish. Several journalists stationed in Uvalde at the time said on Twitter that authorities had promised updates in Spanish. DPS provided information regarding a centralized resource center for affected families in English and Spanish, according to a May 27 Facebook post.

In a joint Press releasemembers of Congress said that many Spanish resources on the shooting came from bilingual journalists or Spanish-speaking members of Congress.

Also on ExpressNews.com: Green Day blasts Ted Cruz with profanity banner during European tour

In a statement, Castro said, “Uvalde’s Mexican-American identity is fundamental to the story of this tragedy. As the community grapples with the aftermath of the shooting, Texas authorities must put their needs at the center of our state‘s response. The refusal of the Texas Department of Public Safety to provide bilingual information about their investigation is insulting and wrong. I urge DPS to do the right thing and ensure that all updates are provided in English and Spanish in the future.

timothy.fanning@express-news.net

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The State Farm stadium in Glendale used for the World Cup warm-up https://disturbmedia.com/the-state-farm-stadium-in-glendale-used-for-the-world-cup-warm-up/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 21:13:29 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/the-state-farm-stadium-in-glendale-used-for-the-world-cup-warm-up/ The CAST 11 podcast network is sponsored by the Prescott Valley Outdoor Summit. Where adventure comes together. Five months from the 2022 World Cup, friendlies are not limited to competition. They can let a team know how prepared they are for the biggest stage in football. Such was the case on Thursday when Mexico, ranked […]]]>
The CAST 11 podcast network is sponsored by the Prescott Valley Outdoor Summit. Where adventure comes together.

Five months from the 2022 World Cup, friendlies are not limited to competition. They can let a team know how prepared they are for the biggest stage in football.

Such was the case on Thursday when Mexico, ranked ninth in the world by FIFA, came up against a determined 13th-placed Uruguay side and lost 3-0 at State Farm Stadium.

“The reality is that we are not ready,” Mexico coach Gerardo “Tata” Martino told the media afterwards in Spanish.

Uruguay, Mexico, World Cup, State Farm Stadium,

Uruguay came out of their friendly match against Mexico with a 3-0 win. Both teams used the competition as a focus for the World Cup. (Photo courtesy of Team Uruguay)

This year’s World Cup in Qatar will be held in winter rather than summer due to Qatar’s warm temperatures. The next World Cup is scheduled for North America, with the United States, Canada and Mexico hosting matches, which means that all three nations automatically receive places for the competition.

For now, Mexico and Uruguay will do their best to improve in each of their final games in hopes of a deep run this winter.

Mexico still have three games scheduled before the start of the World Cup. Uruguay have one planned ahead of kicking off their World Cup campaign against South Korea.

Thursday’s game must have looked like a home game for Mexico. Outside the stadium, many cars displayed the country’s green, white and red flag. Inside the stadium, the majority of the 57,000 people present donned the green jerseys of El Tri.

It didn’t matter to the Uruguayan players, who made Mexico look average on Thursday night. Although the game was only a friendly, with so little opportunity to assess the teams before the start of the World Cup, both coaches opted for solid line-ups in this game.

Each team featured players from some of Europe’s top clubs, although many players had just completed their club seasons in mid to late May.

Uruguay launched Edison Cavani, who plays for Manchester United in the English Premier League, with Real Madrid‘s Federico Valverde, who won the Champions League final five days earlier. Valverde attended the celebratory parade in Madrid the following day before flying 4 p.m. to Phoenix for that match, in which he played the full 90 minutes. Mexico have started star striker Raul Jimenez, who also plays in the English First Division, as well as Jesus Corona, who plays for Sevilla in the Spanish First Division.

Less than a minute into the match, the Mexican fans have already launched their signing wave. As the wave continued around the stadium, boos rained down from the stands with every Uruguayan touch on the ball. Unfazed, the players worked the ball in the opening minutes looking for holes in the defence, but Mexico maintained solid and dominant possession in their own half.

Although they had less of the ball to start, Uruguay continually pressured the Mexican defense which eventually resulted in a trio of chances in the 13th minute, the last of which was struck by Valverde and hit the post, temporarily silencing the crowd.

That silence when Uruguay attacked, however, was surpassed by cheers every time El Tri advanced the ball down the pitch. As Mexico’s attack progressed, the fans suddenly rose to help push their team towards goal.

Uruguay continued to press on Mexico’s goal until finally they broke through in the 35th minute. A Uruguayan corner found Edison Cavani, who headed a straight ball at Mexican keeper Talavera, who could only parry it into the box where it was exploited by Inter Milan midfielder Matias Vecino.

“The way that goal came in was on an error,” Martino said after the game. “It was a big initial mistake. With the head, we did not jump. We cannot give them those opportunities.

Mexican fans were silent again as the teams returned to the dressing rooms at halftime. Things wouldn’t work out from there as Uruguay scored in the first minute of the second half.

Just after kick-off, midfielder Facundo Pellistri ignored his defender and launched a cross on target into the box which found Uruguay’s main man in the middle, Edison Cavani, who was simply tapped from there to double La Celeste’s lead.

Mexico looked stagnant and minutes after hearing Martino’s speech at half-time they found themselves trailing 2-0.

Ten minutes after the start of the second half, Uruguay consolidated their victory with a third goal, again thanks to Cavani. Damien Suarez, who replaced injured Barcelona defender Ronald Araujo’s right-back, found himself in space on the right side and then sent the ball into the top of the box where a wide-open Cavani took the shot and buried him in the bottom. left corner after Talavera.

“In the first half the team played well,” said Martino. “Later, Uruguay played very well. We had two chances to score (in the first half). The first half was equal.”

Although the performance fell short of their expectations, Mexico still have time to improve ahead of this year’s World Cup, and there were positives to take from this game.

Even though the score line may not have reflected it, neither coach thought Mexico was heavily outplayed.
“They played better than us a few times,” Uruguay coach Diego Alonso said after the game. “I think what we did today is we played well. It’s not that Mexico didn’t play well.
Although many were quick to criticize Martino for his performance, he managed to stay positive while solving the team’s problems.

“Against the big rivals we didn’t compete badly,” said Martino. “We did well until we made the mistakes that these top teams don’t make, or they achieve things that we can’t achieve. That’s when the score goes to one side. We let’s not answer that.

Read more stories in Sports on Signals A Z.com.


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WHO Director-General’s opening remarks during Member States’ briefing on COVID-19 and other issues – 9 June 2022 – Global https://disturbmedia.com/who-director-generals-opening-remarks-during-member-states-briefing-on-covid-19-and-other-issues-9-june-2022-global/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 04:06:56 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/who-director-generals-opening-remarks-during-member-states-briefing-on-covid-19-and-other-issues-9-june-2022-global/ Honorable Ministers, Excellencies, Dear Colleagues and Friends, Good morning, good afternoon and good evening to all Member States, and thank you for joining us once again. Globally, the number of reported COVID-19 cases and deaths continues to decline. This is an encouraging trend, but the Secretariat continues to urge caution. Overall, there is not enough […]]]>

Honorable Ministers, Excellencies, Dear Colleagues and Friends,

Good morning, good afternoon and good evening to all Member States, and thank you for joining us once again.

Globally, the number of reported COVID-19 cases and deaths continues to decline.

This is an encouraging trend, but the Secretariat continues to urge caution.

Overall, there is not enough testing and not enough vaccination.

On average, about three-quarters of health workers and people aged over 60 worldwide have been vaccinated.

But these rates are much lower in low-income countries.

Vaccine supplies are now sufficient, but demand in many countries with the lowest vaccination rates is lacking.

The perception that the pandemic is over is understandable, but misguided. Now is not the time to let our guard down.

A new, more dangerous variant could appear at any time and large numbers of people remain unprotected.

It has now been two and a half years since we first identified cases of this novel coronavirus.

We don’t yet have answers as to where it came from or how it entered the human population.

Last year, the WHO established the Scientific Advisory Group on the Origins of Novel Pathogens, or SAGO, to outline the studies needed to identify the origins of SARS-CoV-2 and to create a global framework for studying the origins. emerging and recurrent diseases. emerging pathogens.

Understanding the origins of the virus is very important scientifically, to prevent future epidemics and pandemics.

But morally, we also owe it to all those who suffered and died, and to their families.

The longer it takes, the more difficult it becomes. We need to step up and act with a sense of urgency.

All hypotheses must remain on the table until we have evidence that allows us to rule out certain hypotheses.

This makes it all the more urgent that this scientific work be separated from politics.

The way to prevent politicization is for countries to share data and samples, with transparency and without interference from any government.

The only way this scientific work can successfully progress is with the full cooperation of all countries, including China, where the first cases of SARS-CoV-2 were reported.

For example, WHO has established a collaboration with Italy to verify the 2019 sample results. We thank Italy for voluntarily sharing data and samples for independent verification.

This collaboration never became a political issue, due to the transparent way in which Italy cooperated.

SAGO needs the best scientific evidence to make the most robust assessment possible.

His work will provide essential clues to predict and prepare for future epidemics and pandemics.

I call on all Member States to cooperate fully with SAGO, for the benefit of all of us and future generations.

Yesterday, Member States received the first SAGO report. In a few moments, Dr Mike Ryan, Dr Maria Van Kerkhove and SAGO Chair Professor Marietjie Venter of the University of Pretoria, South Africa, will introduce you to SAGO’s work to date and key findings from the report.

I am also pleased to welcome the Vice-President, Professor Jean-Claude Manuguerra, from the Institut Pasteur, France.

I welcome you both and thank you for your leadership and your work.

Following their briefing, Dr. Mariângela Simão will provide an update on the COVID Technology Access Pool, or C-TAP.

Two years ago, following the example of the former President of Costa Rica, President Alvarado, WHO and our partners created C-TAP to promote voluntary mechanisms for sharing intellectual property, know-how and Datas.

I thank Costa Rica, former President Alvarado and the 43 Member States who co-sponsored the Solidarity Call to Action establishing C-TAP.

I also thank Unitaid and the Medicines Patent Pool, as well as UNDP, UNAIDS and Open COVID Pledge.

I’m especially grateful to public research institutes like the Spanish Research Council and the US National Institutes of Health, for sharing their technologies and helping us prove that C-TAP works. I also thank Spain and Belgium for their financial support.

As always, we appreciate your participation in today’s presentations and look forward to your questions, comments and advice.

Jude, come back to yourself.

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Family helped make Kate Schiltz ’22 a Fulbright student – CSB/SJU https://disturbmedia.com/family-helped-make-kate-schiltz-22-a-fulbright-student-csb-sju/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 15:41:18 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/family-helped-make-kate-schiltz-22-a-fulbright-student-csb-sju/ Editor’s note: This feature on Kate Schiltz ’22 is the third of six to appear this summer on College of Saint Benedict and Saint John’s University graduates who have received Fulbright US Student Program awards. Kate Schiltz ’22 really had no choice but to excel. His sister, Anna, graduated summa cum laude from Macalester College. […]]]>

Editor’s note: This feature on Kate Schiltz ’22 is the third of six to appear this summer on College of Saint Benedict and Saint John’s University graduates who have received Fulbright US Student Program awards.

Kate Schiltz ’22 really had no choice but to excel.

His sister, Anna, graduated summa cum laude from Macalester College. One of his brothers, Joe, graduated from the University of Minnesota with a 4.0 GPA. His mother, Elizabeth, is the acting associate dean at the University of St. Thomas Law School. And her father, Patrick, is a judge in the United States District Court in Minneapolis.

So, perhaps we shouldn’t be surprised that Kate double majored in English and Hispanic Studies, never fell below an A in any of her courses at the College of Saint Benedict and Saint John’s University, and was l one of six CSB and SJU graduates who won Fulbright scholarships for students for the 2022-23 academic year.

Starting this fall, she will be living in Madrid, Spain, and working as an English teaching assistant at IE Universitya private school that welcomes students from more than 130 countries and is ranked by many indicators as one of the best universities in Europe.

Of course, being a Fulbrighter isn’t even unique in one’s own house. Joe earned this honor several years ago and studied in Berlin.

“I had some really good role models,” Kate said. “I saw them succeed and I was like ‘I have to do this too’.”

Brother, Peter, encourages his vision

Still, with all that intellectual firepower in her family tree, Kate derives perhaps the greatest motivation from her brother, Peter, who is five years older and was born with Down syndrome, autism and speech apraxia.

“We are very close,” Kate said. “He’s just the best human I’ve ever interacted with. He taught me a lot about what it means to be authentic, because he doesn’t really care what other people think. He doesn’t really have that ability. He is often happy and he knows exactly when I am sad and how to cheer me up. As he is my older brother, I never grew up learning that he had a disability. He was never than my brother. As I got older, I could tell that people would start to act differently towards him and I would understand that. But it was a really unique experience. As much as I can help take care of him physically, he definitely takes care of me. emotionally.

This is one of the reasons she wants to pursue a career in helping people with disabilities. And, since her sister married a man from Bolivia – and they recently had a baby, Kate is also interested in immigration due to her brother-in-law’s background.

“I see how he’s been treated and all the legal hurdles he has to go through as a non-citizen of the United States, and it made me think maybe I want to do something with the Spanish-speaking population.” , said Kate. “Especially if they have a disability, because I know the obstacles they face. And if they speak Spanish, there are even more obstacles they are likely to face.

Unsurprisingly, Kate plans to go to law school once she completes her Fulbright studies.

“I tried to run away as long as possible and not look like my parents, but it’s inevitable,” she said. “I realized that I really like the law. I like the way it works.

Witnessing Chauvin’s conviction affirms the future of the law

Given the influence of her mother and father, Kate was energized by a summer 2021 internship with a state court judge Judge Edward Wahl, and she also spent time observing Judge Peter Cahill. Both serve the Fourth Judicial District from the Hennepin County Courthouse. Kate was privileged to attend a variety of their meetings and hearings, including being one of the few people allowed to watch the Sentencing of Derek Chauvin live in the courtroom. As well as watching Judge Cahill, Kate got to meet both legal teams in one of the most high-profile cases in recent US history.

“This internship really cemented my interest in the field of law, and I learned a lot from some really amazing professionals,” Kate said.

She is on her way to join them. After graduating from Minnetonka High School, she served four years as a writing center tutor at CSB and SJU. This was in addition to achieving Phi Beta Kappa status as a senior, joining Delta Epsilon Sigma – an elite national Catholic honor society, and being president of Students for Life and Vice. -President of the AKS Service Sorority.

“What drew me to Saint Ben’s — and it’s cliché because everyone says it — was the community,” Schiltz said. “Immediately as I walked around campus, I felt at home and like everyone really cared about everyone. The teachers, monks and nuns cared about us. I think because my family is so close, I wanted that feeling in college too. Leaving now as an alum I found some amazing people who made me feel like I had a new family who helped me through some tough times and were also there for some really good times .

Kate visited Spain for two weeks in high school and lived in Italy for two months when her mother was teaching in Rome.

“I traveled with my parents, but I’m excited for this time to come and to be able to travel on my own,” Kate said. “When I was little we had a lot of au pairs, some of them from Germany and Poland. I think it would be really cool to visit them. And I would love to go back and walk around where I used to live in Rome.

Kate leaves in September for her Fulbright duties, but will first work this summer as a barista and will also be her brother’s babysitter.

“Leaving him is going to be the hardest part of leaving,” she said.

CSB and SJU students interested in applying for a Fulbright Award for the 2023-24 academic year should contact Phil Kronebuschprofessor of political science and coordinator of competitive scholarships at CSB and SJU, or Lindsey Gunnerson GutschDirector of the Office of Undergraduate Research at CSB and SJU.

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Mexico and Uruguay use friendly match at State Farm stadium to prepare for World Cup https://disturbmedia.com/mexico-and-uruguay-use-friendly-match-at-state-farm-stadium-to-prepare-for-world-cup/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 23:21:01 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/mexico-and-uruguay-use-friendly-match-at-state-farm-stadium-to-prepare-for-world-cup/ Forward Alexis Vega of Mexico fights for the ball during a friendly match between Uruguay. Mexican coach Gerardo Martino has acknowledged that his team is sufficiently prepared for the World Cup. (Photo by Omar Vega/Getty Images) GLENDALE — With five months until the 2022 World Cup, friendlies aren’t just about competition. They can let a […]]]>

Forward Alexis Vega of Mexico fights for the ball during a friendly match between Uruguay. Mexican coach Gerardo Martino has acknowledged that his team is sufficiently prepared for the World Cup. (Photo by Omar Vega/Getty Images)

GLENDALE — With five months until the 2022 World Cup, friendlies aren’t just about competition. They can let a team know how prepared they are for the biggest stage in football.

Such was the case on Thursday when Mexico, ranked ninth in the world by FIFA, came up against a determined 13th-placed Uruguay side and lost 3-0 at State Farm Stadium.

“The reality is that we are not ready,” Mexico coach Gerardo “Tata” Martino told the media afterwards in Spanish.

This year’s World Cup in Qatar will be held in winter rather than summer due to Qatar’s warm temperatures. The next World Cup is scheduled for North America, with the United States, Canada and Mexico hosting matches, which means that all three nations automatically receive places for the competition.

For now, Mexico and Uruguay will do their best to improve in each of their final games in hopes of a deep run this winter.

Mexico still have three games scheduled before the start of the World Cup. Uruguay have one planned ahead of kicking off their World Cup campaign against South Korea.

Thursday’s game must have looked like a home game for Mexico. Outside the stadium, many cars displayed the country’s green, white and red flag. Inside the stadium, the majority of the 57,000 people present donned the green jerseys of El Tri.

It didn’t matter to the Uruguayan players, who made Mexico look average on Thursday night. Although the game was only a friendly, with so little opportunity to assess the teams before the start of the World Cup, both coaches opted for solid line-ups in this game.

Each team featured players from some of Europe’s top clubs, although many players had just completed their club season between mid and late May.

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Uruguay launched Edison Cavani, who plays for Manchester United in the English Premier League, with Real Madrid‘s Federico Valverde, who won the Champions League final five days earlier. Valverde attended the celebratory parade in Madrid the following day before flying 4 p.m. to Phoenix for that match, in which he played the full 90 minutes. Mexico have started star striker Raul Jimenez, who also plays in the English First Division, as well as Jesus Corona, who plays for Sevilla in the Spanish First Division.

Less than a minute into the match, the Mexican fans have already launched their signing wave. As the wave continued around the stadium, boos rained down from the stands with every Uruguayan touch on the ball. Unfazed, the players worked the ball in the opening minutes looking for holes in the defence, but Mexico maintained solid and dominant possession in their own half.

Although they had less of the ball to start, Uruguay continually pressured the Mexican defense which eventually resulted in a trio of chances in the 13th minute, the last of which was struck by Valverde and hit the post, temporarily silencing the crowd.

That silence when Uruguay attacked, however, was surpassed by cheers every time El Tri advanced the ball down the pitch. As Mexico’s attack progressed, the fans suddenly rose to help push their team towards goal.

Uruguay continued to press on Mexico’s goal until it finally broke through in the 35th minute. A Uruguayan corner found Edison Cavani, who headed a straight ball at Mexican keeper Talavera, who could only parry it into the box where it was exploited by Inter Milan midfielder Matias Vecino.

“The way that goal came in was on an error,” Martino said after the game. “It was a big initial mistake. With the head, we did not jump. We cannot give them those opportunities.

Mexican fans were silent again as the teams returned to the dressing rooms at halftime. Things wouldn’t work out from there as Uruguay scored in the first minute of the second half.

Just after kick-off, midfielder Facundo Pellistri ignored his defender and launched a cross on target into the box which found Uruguay’s main man in the middle, Edison Cavani, who was simply tapped from there to double La Celeste’s lead.

Uruguay came out of their friendly match against Mexico with a 3-0 win. Both teams used the competition as a focus for the World Cup. (Photo courtesy of Team Uruguay)

Mexico looked stagnant and minutes after hearing Martino’s speech at half-time they found themselves trailing 2-0.

Ten minutes after the start of the second half, Uruguay consolidated their victory with a third goal, again thanks to Cavani. Damien Suarez, who replaced injured Barcelona defender Ronald Araujo’s right-back, found himself in space on the right side and then sent the ball into the top of the box where a wide-open Cavani took the shot and buried him in the bottom. left corner after Talavera.

“In the first half the team played well,” said Martino. “Later, Uruguay played very well. We had two chances to score (in the first half). The first half was equal.”

Although the performance fell short of their expectations, Mexico still have time to improve ahead of this year’s World Cup, and there were positives to take from this game.

Even though the score line may not have reflected it, neither coach thought Mexico was heavily outplayed.
“They played better than us a few times,” Uruguay coach Diego Alonso said after the game. “I think what we did today is we played well. It’s not that Mexico didn’t play well.
Although many were quick to criticize Martino for his performance, he managed to stay positive while solving the team’s problems.

“Against the big rivals we didn’t compete badly,” said Martino. “We did well until we made the mistakes that these top teams don’t make, or they achieve things that we can’t achieve. That’s when the score goes to one side. We let’s not answer that.

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Shakira confirms split with soccer star Pique https://disturbmedia.com/shakira-confirms-split-with-soccer-star-pique/ Sat, 04 Jun 2022 12:30:06 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/shakira-confirms-split-with-soccer-star-pique/ ]]>

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FILE – Colombian singer Shakira, right, and FC Barcelona soccer player Gerard Pique pose for the media during the presentation of their new album ‘Shakira’ in Barcelona, ​​Spain, March 20, 2014. Colombian pop star Shakira and her partner, Spanish soccer star Gerard Pique, are parting ways. In a statement released by Shakira’s public relations company on Saturday, the couple said, “We regret to confirm that we are separating. For the well-being of our children, which is our highest priority, we ask that you respect our privacy. (AP Photo/Manu Fernandez, File)

PA

Colombian pop star Shakira and her partner, Spanish footballer Gerard Pique, are going their separate ways, the pair announced in a statement on Saturday.

“We regret to confirm that we are separating,” the pair said in a statement released by Shakira’s PR firm. “For the well-being of our children, which is our top priority, we ask that you respect our privacy. Thanks for understanding.”

Shakira, 45, met the Barcelona defender while she was promoting her 2010 World Cup anthem, ‘Waka Waka (This Time for Africa)’. The couple have two children, Sasha and Milan.

In recent days, rumors about the end of the couple’s 11-year relationship had gripped the Spanish media, fueled by reports that Pique, 35, had left the family home in Barcelona and was living alone in the city.

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