Spanish tradition – Disturb Media http://disturbmedia.com/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 21:38:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://disturbmedia.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-6-120x120.png Spanish tradition – Disturb Media http://disturbmedia.com/ 32 32 “Tony Dancer” rings in 2022 with the historic Paul Revere bell of Bath https://disturbmedia.com/tony-dancer-rings-in-2022-with-the-historic-paul-revere-bell-of-bath/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 21:38:30 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/tony-dancer-rings-in-2022-with-the-historic-paul-revere-bell-of-bath/ Antonio “Tony Dancer” Garreton stands with the centuries-old Paul Revere Bell in the Belfry of Bath Town Hall. Kathleen O’Brien / The time record Antionio Garreton, known locally as ‘Tony Dancer’, rang the New Years Eve in Bath by ringing Paul Revere’s centenary bell at noon on New Years Eve. Standing atop City Hall, looking […]]]>

Antonio “Tony Dancer” Garreton stands with the centuries-old Paul Revere Bell in the Belfry of Bath Town Hall. Kathleen O’Brien / The time record

Antionio Garreton, known locally as ‘Tony Dancer’, rang the New Years Eve in Bath by ringing Paul Revere’s centenary bell at noon on New Years Eve.

Standing atop City Hall, looking out over Bath city center, Garreton said he never thought he would be recognized as Bath’s 2021 Citizen of the Year when he moved to Maine, but Bath has turned out to be one of the most welcoming places he has ever lived.

“After living in New York and Washington DC, moving to Bath has been a very radical and strong change,” said Garreton. “To look around and not see another person of my race or culture was shocking in my mind. Eighteen years ago I thought I would be unable to live here being Afro-Latino and gay, but it wasn’t like that.

Garreton spoke to his family in Peru on the city’s livestream on Facebook Live before pulling on the rope that rang the centuries-old bell. Garreton said he counts in Spanish by ringing the bell 12 times to mark the hour because it is “the language of my heart”.

With every ring of the bell, Garreton said he wanted his community to “continue to get along and strengthen our community, not to regret 2021, and instead to be grateful that we survived it, and to learn if we have. had a bad experience, to make 2022 better.

Garreton was born and raised in Peru and moved to the United States at the age of 17. Garreton made a name for himself in Bath when he opened Tony Dance Fiesta, a dance studio on Center Street in Bath, where he offers dance and Zumba lessons. He used his classes to share his culture and inspire his students to love themselves for who they are, but Garreton began volunteering and organizing fundraisers after a student committed suicide in 2015.

Antonio “Tony Dancer” Garreton pulls the rope on the roof of Bath Town Hall to ring the town’s Paul Revere bell. Kathleen O’Brien / The time record

In the New Year, Garreton said he wanted to continue working with the Midcoast Youth Center in Bath, which provides a host of resources free of charge, such as after-school programs, adult mentors, homework clubs, hot snacks and meals, and school clothes and supplies if needed. The association also connects students in need with all resources outside the center, such as health care, mental health support or drug addiction treatment.

Previously, Garreton gathered school supplies for the Set for Success event at the Midcoast Youth Center by hosting dance classes and asking attendees to bring school supplies to donate to the event instead of payment.

Garreton also organized a drive-through collection of groceries and cooked meals to bring to elderly residents of Bath during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Although residents were discouraged from congregating under Town Hall or the Christmas carol when the bell rang to mitigate the risk of the spread of COVID-19, Bath’s marketing communications specialist Lindsey Goudreau said that the town was still determined to continue the tradition of ringing the town’s Paul Revere bell at noon. on New Years Eve “to add a sense of normalcy to the community”.

“It’s an event that not only celebrates this historic piece of Bath, but it also celebrates this tradition of selecting a Citizen of the Year and the good he does for the community and giving him the opportunity to do something. something special, ”said Goudreau.

The Paul Revere Bell of Bath was cast over 200 years ago and is one of four Paul Revere bells in the state. Although Revere’s family-owned metallurgy business sank nearly 400 bells, Bath’s was established during Revere’s lifetime.

The Bath Bell was commissioned by the former North Meetinghouse congregation, according to Jack Martin, reference librarian in the Sagadahoc History and Genealogy Room at the Patten Free Library. The bell was hung from the spire of North Church, the town’s meeting house on the corner of High and Center streets in 1803.

Over time, the bell bounced around various churches in Bath, but the city eventually bought it in 1928 and it was moved to the Town Hall Belfry where it stands today, according to Martin. . Now the bell only rings on New Years Eve by the Bath Citizen of the Year.

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Huntsville City Classic returns after a year of hiatus https://disturbmedia.com/huntsville-city-classic-returns-after-a-year-of-hiatus/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 22:40:38 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/huntsville-city-classic-returns-after-a-year-of-hiatus/ HUNTSVILLE, Alabama – An annual tradition has returned to the field, featuring teams from across the Tennessee Valley and beyond. The 39th Huntsville City Classic kicked off Monday after spending a year on the sidelines thanks to the pandemic. Sixteen high school basketball teams attended the tournament hosted by Huntsville High School. Cyber ​​Huntsville Offers […]]]>

HUNTSVILLE, Alabama – An annual tradition has returned to the field, featuring teams from across the Tennessee Valley and beyond. The 39th Huntsville City Classic kicked off Monday after spending a year on the sidelines thanks to the pandemic.

Sixteen high school basketball teams attended the tournament hosted by Huntsville High School.

Sparkman, Columbia, Buckhorn, Oxford, Huntsville, Spanish Fort, Hazel Green, Jacksonville, Lee-Huntsville, Madison Academy, James Clemens, Enterprise, Grissom, Bob Jones, Mae Jemison and Anniston.

The event will last a total of three days, from Monday to Wednesday, December 29. After Monday’s games, all winning teams will continue to compete in the main gymnasium at Huntsville High School. All matches played in the losing category will be transferred to an auxiliary gymnasium. The championship match will start at 7:00 p.m.

For more information, you can follow the official website of the event Twitter account here.

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Christmas Tradition: Lincoln Church Stays True To Legacy And Embraces Change | News https://disturbmedia.com/christmas-tradition-lincoln-church-stays-true-to-legacy-and-embraces-change-news/ Sat, 25 Dec 2021 16:02:00 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/christmas-tradition-lincoln-church-stays-true-to-legacy-and-embraces-change-news/ On a Sunday in December shirt sleeves, worshipers ascend the steps of the Evangelical Lutheran Church at Friedens in the Lincoln Lowlands. The church’s annual German worship service is about to begin, recalling the early 20th century days of corner grocery stores and summer kitchens and newcomers to modest clapboard houses, folding their children into […]]]>

On a Sunday in December shirt sleeves, worshipers ascend the steps of the Evangelical Lutheran Church at Friedens in the Lincoln Lowlands.

The church’s annual German worship service is about to begin, recalling the early 20th century days of corner grocery stores and summer kitchens and newcomers to modest clapboard houses, folding their children into America’s messy melting pot.

Today, “Silent Night” becomes “Still Nacht”. “O, Christmas Tree” changes to “O Tannenbaum”. The Lord’s Prayer begins with our Vater unser im Himmel.

Many come for nostalgia. To honor the parents, grandparents and great-grandparents who grew up in this enclave of Germans from Russia, a few blocks south of downtown Lincoln.

“It’s the ancestral connection,” says Kathy Tichota. “I just feel this presence of my family from the past.”

That day, Tichota and her family put on their masks and picked up their ballots, pages filled with lyrics from Christmas carols printed in two languages.

“Im Namen Gottes, des Vaters und des Sohnes und des Heiligen Geistes,” said a great guest preacher, the Right Reverend Michael Melchizedek.

Bud Christenson, the white-haired pastor of the church, repeats the words: In the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Ghost.

For the next hour, the day disappears. The past is resuscitated in a cadence transported from the Volga to Ellis Island to the Heartland.

At first, Friedens stuck to the customs of its founders while working hard to integrate into a new country.

Service in English at 10 a.m. every Sunday, followed by service in German at 11 a.m.

The last Sunday service in German disappeared from Sixth and D’s church in 1965. But the congregation was not ready to let go.

So, year after year, at the dawn of Christmas, they come together.

Students, like Paul Masin de Ponca, who sits on a back bench with friends. The University of Nebraska-Lincoln freshman was sent by his German language teacher, Frau Jensen.

“It was interesting,” he says. “I didn’t really understand much. “

Neither did Donna Chapin, who came to the service for the first time with her husband, Jack.

“But it’s a joy to know that this is happening because I don’t want to forget my German heritage, for better or for worse.”

By the turn of the 20th century, there were at least six Lincoln churches filled with Germans from Russia, said Pam Wurst, retired reference librarian at the American Historical Society of Germans in Russia.

They had spent generations in Russia thanks to Catherine the Great, a princess of German blood.

There they had their own villages, lands and churches. They kept their language.

In the late 1800s, Catherine’s grandson resumed his promises. The men were to serve in the Russian army. Children should go to Russian school. Their churches were threatened.

“Most German men don’t like being told what to do,” Wurst said. “So they started to settle their families here.”

The railroad paid a lot for the ride, dropping them off in towns across Nebraska. An early immigrant and grocer named HJ Amen sponsored villagers to settle in Lincoln.

In 1914, one in three babies born in the city had German-Russian parents.

Those in the lowlands went to church.

Friedens could claim 450 members by his 20th birthday in 1927.

“There were hundreds of kids for Sunday school in that basement,” said longtime member Karen Scribner.

Scribner is busy in her kitchen the night before the special Sunday service. The retired teacher has already filled a Tupperware with delicate spritz cookies. Now she garnishes her kuchen with a rival’s cherries: flour, butter and sugar. The spiral-bound German cookbook that belonged to his parents is open on the table.

His parents and their parents before them were devoted to the church and to its community.

“I carry this with me,” she said. “I like Friedens to continue.”

She spreads the word every December, sending emails to German teachers and newspapers, radio stations and former visitors to remind them to save the date.

Irene Newhouse and her daughter Abby will be making German pastries.

The mother arrived in Lincoln as a hugged baby with her parents and grandparents in 1952.

The three generations lived together.

“Grandma stayed at home with me while my parents worked,” she said. “She learned English by watching soap operas.”

But they also spoke German at home, and the church was their foundation.

This annual German religious service is a link with what is always close to her heart.

“It’s just very emotional. When people sing these German anthems, you can see tears welling up in their eyes.

This year, mother and daughter, dressed in red, are waiting at the entrance to welcome their guests.

Then the assembly sings.

Freue dich, Welt, dein Konig naht…

Joy to the world, the Lord has come …

Round trip, round trip, a refrain from the early years.

During these early decades, the pastors of Friedens were to minister in two languages, preaching from a pulpit perched high on the wall.

World War I accelerated the assimilation of all Germans in Nebraska. Germantown has become Garland, Berlin has become Otoe. The Nebraska Legislature has passed a law prohibiting the teaching of any subject in a language other than English.

Then came Hitler and World War II.

“Most churches have switched strictly to English,” Wurst said. “They didn’t want to be known as Germans.”

But Friedens Germans were very stubborn.

“My parents went to the service in English and returned home,” said Kathie Svoboda, whose grandfather oversaw the construction of the church. “They considered themselves to be completely American.”

The girl, now 92, stayed behind and sang in the German choir, studied German at university and felt the sentimental pull.

Friedens is the last of the Russian German churches in the South Bottoms.

It is a church that survived a fire, that mourned members who died in the 1918 influenza pandemic. A church that sent dozens of young men with German blood to fight for the United States during the WWII and held funerals for those who never returned home.

Peace. That’s what Friedens means in German.

They try to live this promise.

As its numbers dwindled and the Volga Germans spread through the city and disappear into its fabric, Friedens opened its doors to small congregations in need of a home.

For almost four years now, members of Cristo Jesus la resurreccion y la vida have been meeting in the basement of the church on Sunday evenings for services in Spanish. And a Karen congregation meets on Saturdays.

They will be there as usual on the last Saturday of December – Christmas Day, sharing a meal and the traditions of their homeland of Burma, where they were persecuted as ethnic minorities and fled for freedom.

A congregation balancing two worlds. Two languages.

“The Karen people are new to this country, as are the people who founded Friedens,” says Scribner. “It means a lot to us to welcome them to this country, as we have been welcomed. “

The Flatwater Free Press is Nebraska’s first independent, nonprofit newsroom focused on the investigations and stories that matter.


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Tamales: A delicious Christmas tradition in the middle of the valley | Local https://disturbmedia.com/tamales-a-delicious-christmas-tradition-in-the-middle-of-the-valley-local/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 14:00:00 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/tamales-a-delicious-christmas-tradition-in-the-middle-of-the-valley-local/ Homemade tamales are a Christmas tradition for many Latin American families, and the Mid-Willamette Valley has several local businesses and individuals providing the delicious treat during the holidays. Each tamal (the singular in Spanish) is stuffed and packaged with care, and the recipes are often passed down from generation to generation to allow people to […]]]>

Homemade tamales are a Christmas tradition for many Latin American families, and the Mid-Willamette Valley has several local businesses and individuals providing the delicious treat during the holidays.

Each tamal (the singular in Spanish) is stuffed and packaged with care, and the recipes are often passed down from generation to generation to allow people to connect with their families.

Preparation varies by region, but tamales are usually made from masa or dough, stuffed with filling, and steamed in a corn husk or banana leaf. The wrapper can be used as a plate or thrown away before eating.

Kathy Ballweber’s Victorian Village is one of the many exhibits in Christmas Storybook Land. The event takes place December 3-17 at the Linn County Expo Center.



Cody Mann, Mid Valley Media



But how did tamales become a Christmas tradition? Well, in Mesoamerica, corn was once considered to be the precious substance and life, and it was believed that the gods created humans from corn. Thus, the wrapped tamales were part of the ritual offerings.

They were one of the earliest portable foods and were consumed by the Mayans, Aztecs, Olmecs, Toltecs, and Incas. In addition to being eaten at Christmas, tamales are an essential part of many life cycle events, such as baptisms, first communions, and wedding anniversaries.

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While many local tamale makers have stopped accepting orders this Christmas, tamales are available year-round and are equally delicious in the spring, summer, and fall. Here are three local places to support in the city:

Rommy Streicher lovingly makes frozen tamales for everyone to enjoy all year round, but they are especially popular during the holidays. Try the pork in red sauce, chicken in green sauce, cheese rajas, and two vegan options: vegetables and sweet pumpkin. Sabor tamales can often be found at the Holiday Farmers Market in Albany.

Located at Two Rivers Market, 250 SW Broadalbin St. in Albany and 922 NW Kings Blvd. in Corvallis, Taqueria Alonzo makes chicken and pork tamales for the holidays. Stay warm with the signature Champurrado, a chocolate-based atole, a hot and thick Mexican drink. If you come in person to the store, you can participate in the Christmas giveaway and the winner will be announced on Facebook on December 23.

Located at The Barn at Hickory Station, 640 NW Hickory St. in Albany, this food trailer offers authentic pupusas, with a variety of stuffing options, including vegan. Tamales are stuffed with chicken and wrapped in banana leaves, and in the winter you can sip vegan hot chocolate. Panes rellenos – Salvadoran-style smothered tortas – are also available.

Individuals often sell homemade tamales informally on Facebook. Post to your local Facebook group to see who’s serving up stuffed delicacies in their kitchens this holiday season, and maybe even after Christmas. For many families, tamales are eaten from the Feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe from December 12 through the Three Kings Day on January 6.

Joanna Mann covers education for Mid-Valley Media. She can be contacted at 541-812-6076 or Joanna.Mann@lee.net. Follow her on Twitter via @joanna_mann_.


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From Shakira’s boar brawl to Nicki Minaj’s testicle fiasco: the weirdest news stories of 2021 | Media https://disturbmedia.com/from-shakiras-boar-brawl-to-nicki-minajs-testicle-fiasco-the-weirdest-news-stories-of-2021-media/ Mon, 20 Dec 2021 01:03:00 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/from-shakiras-boar-brawl-to-nicki-minajs-testicle-fiasco-the-weirdest-news-stories-of-2021-media/ In a year that began with the attack on the United States Capitol, continued with the fall of Afghanistan, and ended with the rapid spread of Omicron, the news cycle world has at times been overwhelming. But while 2021 has been another busy year, not all the news has been negative. Here are some of […]]]>

In a year that began with the attack on the United States Capitol, continued with the fall of Afghanistan, and ended with the rapid spread of Omicron, the news cycle world has at times been overwhelming.

But while 2021 has been another busy year, not all the news has been negative. Here are some of the funniest and weirdest stories and titles released this year.

Animals

Sabrina Imbler wrote a perfectly titled New York Times article on moray eels:

Finally, justice for the naturally beautiful and infill-free camels:

The feral pigs were also a sensation, perhaps nostalgic for the dizzying attention of their viral moment in 2019. (They also happen to have a climate impact, we learned this year, equivalent to gas emissions at greenhouse effect of 1.1 million cars.)

The AV Club had fun when they learned that authorities in Puerto Rico were investigating YouTuber Jake Paul for driving on beaches that were turtle nesting areas:

The critically endangered California condor gained attention when a flock of birds made their home in Cinda Mickol’s home over the weekend.

Still on the theme of indifferent beasts: people expressed their class solidarity with the capybaras who infiltrated a rich closed community in Argentina.

Surrealist stories of the pandemic

… including Nicki Minaj, who tweeted that her cousin’s friend in Trinidad had to cancel his marriage because he developed swollen testicles after the Covid vaccine – which the Trinidad and Tobago Ministry of Health has then had to waste time investigating and debunking.

Generation wars

The centuries-old tradition of despising the youngest continued healthily in 2021:

Even if sometimes it seemed justified.

Social media

In September, leaked documents suggested Instagram was making body image problems worse for teenage girls. Comments from Instagram boss Adam Mosseri defending the social network backfired:

The following month, Mark Zuckerberg announced that Facebook was going to change its name to Meta:

and finally

A Spanish bishop found love but lost his powers.



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9 days before Christmas: these are the traditions that Latam celebrates https://disturbmedia.com/9-days-before-christmas-these-are-the-traditions-that-latam-celebrates/ Fri, 17 Dec 2021 03:54:00 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/9-days-before-christmas-these-are-the-traditions-that-latam-celebrates/ “Most benign God of infinite charity, who loved men so much, that you gave them in your son the pledge of your love, so that, made man in the womb of a Virgin, he may be born in a manger for our health and our remedy; I, on behalf of all mortals, thank you very […]]]>

“Most benign God of infinite charity, who loved men so much, that you gave them in your son the pledge of your love, so that, made man in the womb of a Virgin, he may be born in a manger for our health and our remedy; I, on behalf of all mortals, thank you very much for such a great benefit. It is the first paragraph of one of the prayers which are repeated for 9 consecutive days until the night of the 24th, a custom considered to be the longest Christmas celebration in the world.

With 9 days before the celebration of Christmas around the world, in several countries, the celebrations leading up to Christmas Eve begin. This includes festive days of prayer in the company of family and friends, singing Christmas carols, and eating special holiday foods.

With deep influences from Christian and Catholic education, countries, especially in Latin America, carry out rituals with which they pay homage to the birth of Jesus in Bethlehem. Here are some of the traditions that Latin cultures celebrate for nine days, between December 16 and 24:

Christmas “Novena”

Celebrated in Colombia, Venezuela and Ecuador, the novena is a tradition practiced by families who, for nine days, gather around a manger to recite a series of prayers specially written for the time, accompanied by some “joys”. Or special songs to praise the birth of Jesus. .

When they have finished praying, whether in a church, park, shopping mall, or generally in homes, it is usually customary to sing Christmas carols, songs on Christmas themes, and share dishes prepared especially for these dates, such as sweet “natilla” (a kind of pudding) and savory “buñuelos” (fried cheese balls).

The history of this tradition dates back to the 18th century, with the Franciscan monk of Ecuadorian origin, Fray Fernando de Jesús Larrea, who wrote the first novena. A version closer to what is currently celebrated, which includes songs of joy, was later written by nun Bertilda Samper Acosta. It is important to note that this tradition, despite the influence of Catholicism, originated in Latin America.

The “posadas”

Organized in Mexico and other Central American countries, posadas are religious festivals dating back to colonial times (also the 18th century). Through them, families pay homage to the pilgrimage of Joseph and Mary to reach Bethlehem.

Its specific origin occurs when the Spaniards imposed European practices of pre-Christmas celebrations, supplanting the cult of the god of war which was celebrated by the natives in those same days.

Those that were originally known as the ‘Christmas bonus’ and were only celebrated in the atriums of churches and convents, nowadays it is a family tradition that is celebrated in homes and streets, while ‘it is adorned with candles, sparkler lights and “piñatas.”


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The “Quality Wines from the Heart of Europe” project tells of a Spanish ampelographic heritage https://disturbmedia.com/the-quality-wines-from-the-heart-of-europe-project-tells-of-a-spanish-ampelographic-heritage/ Tue, 14 Dec 2021 16:03:21 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/the-quality-wines-from-the-heart-of-europe-project-tells-of-a-spanish-ampelographic-heritage/ NEW YORK (PRWEB) December 14, 2021 The name Costers del Segre DO refers to wines produced in the province of Lleida, in northeastern Spain. The appellation, in collaboration with Slow Food Terres de Lleida – Culturas Trobades y L’Olivera, has started a collaboration that, in the coming years, will shed new light on the wine […]]]>

The name Costers del Segre DO refers to wines produced in the province of Lleida, in northeastern Spain. The appellation, in collaboration with Slow Food Terres de Lleida – Culturas Trobades y L’Olivera, has started a collaboration that, in the coming years, will shed new light on the wine heritage of Poniente and Pirineo, two of the seven sub-zones. Costers del Segre is made of

For this reason, the renowned French ampelographer, Jean-Michel Boursiquot, with his team which includes among others the professor of the University of Montpellier Thierry Lacombe, have visited the region on several occasions, focusing on different strains of old vineyards used for self-consumption at Costers. subzones of Segre. The ampelographer and his team will study the different vines spotted during their site visits to identify the grape varieties they represent. The manager of L’Olivera, oenologist and winemaker, Pau Moragas, explains that the aim of this project is the maintenance of the variety collections, as well as the identification of old vines and the varieties they represent, as well as their reintroduction of varieties and promotion.

This project will once again enhance the typicity of this appellation, which is already a mosaic of different terroirs. Costers del Segre is actually divided into seven distinct subzones which give voice to many different geological and climatic conditions. The connecting link is the middle basin of the Segre river, between the Pyrenees and the Ebro. As for the soil, its main components are limestone and clay and it is poor in organic matter, a common characteristic and uniform throughout the designation of origin.

About the TASTE THE DIFFERENCE PROGRAM

The program: Quality European wines: taste the difference is a project funded by the European Union and managed by Unione Italiana Vini and PRODECA for the promotion of European PDO and IGP wines abroad in China and the United States. In order to achieve this goal, the TTD.EU program will organize seminars, workshops and b2b meetings in these countries as well as in Spain and Italy, inviting wine professionals to participate in study trips to Europe. The program, carried out over a period of three years (2021-2023) aims to raise awareness of quality European wines, in particular Italian and Spanish, which share a long tradition and a high level of quality.

The beneficiaries: Unione Italiana Vini is the oldest and most mandated association in the Italian wine market. It represents cooperative, private and agricultural wine companies, bottlers, consortia, associations and manufacturers of wine machines or cellars / laboratories, located throughout Italy. Promotora de Exportaciones Catalanas (PRODECA) is a public company created in 1986 and part of the “Ministry of Climate Action, Food and Rural Agenda of the Government of Catalonia”. It supports the agri-food sector and its companies with the knowledge, tools and experience to increase their products in Catalonia and in the world.

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Gardening Etcetera: A celebration of the not-so-gloomy midwinter | Local https://disturbmedia.com/gardening-etcetera-a-celebration-of-the-not-so-gloomy-midwinter-local/ Sat, 11 Dec 2021 12:30:00 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/gardening-etcetera-a-celebration-of-the-not-so-gloomy-midwinter-local/ JACKEE ALSTON For gardeners and farmers in colder climates, the winter solstice should be one of the most anticipated days on the calendar. It represents the annual journey from darkness and cold to light and heat. In short, it’s a celebration of the return to spring. For me, it is synonymous with the cultivation of […]]]>

JACKEE ALSTON

For gardeners and farmers in colder climates, the winter solstice should be one of the most anticipated days on the calendar. It represents the annual journey from darkness and cold to light and heat. In short, it’s a celebration of the return to spring. For me, it is synonymous with the cultivation of green objects.

In the northern hemisphere, the winter solstice is the longest night and the shortest day of the year. It can be depressing to be in that darkest time, but it used to be a cause for rejoicing as it meant that from then on the sun would show its face longer. For 2021, the winter solstice falls on December 21 and with the disappointing and dry winter so far, I am particularly looking forward to it.

Some studies believe that humans have celebrated the winter solstice since the Neolithic period, which would have been at the end of the Stone Age, around 10,000 years ago. This means that humans understood the movements of the seasons fairly quickly and noticed a pattern! Monuments, such as Stonehenge, are oriented to align with the winter solstice sunset. Other parts of Scotland and Ireland also have monoliths, supporting the theory that these structures were used to ritually capture the sun on this shortest day of the year.

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It’s a wonder how these structures could have been built so long ago to calculate the exact time of the seasonal change, but they do. Not to mention that they also capture the summer solstice. And although the last time Stonehenge was likely used by ancient humans was the Iron Age, the placement of the stones is still pretty accurate.

What’s even more amazing is that many other cultures around the world have also calculated and anticipated the Winter Solstice. Most considered it a season to worship their solar deities. The Incas before the Spanish conquest fasted for three days and then used a mirror to capture the dawn of the solstice sun to start a fire. It has been called many names by these various cultures, but the name

Midwinter is my favorite because it reminds me to use the time for thinking, slowing down, and peaceful interaction with nature itself. In historic times, this was also how the Solstice was treated, although that didn’t mean it wasn’t also a time to get together and feast. And that either for us.

Here are a few ideas gardeners might find particularly appealing to celebrate midwinter. First of all, how about putting amaryllis or white paper bulbs to brighten up your home? Second, make a list of all the plants you might want to grow in the future. Better yet, pull out catalogs of bulbs, tubers and seeds to make you dream of how spectacular your garden will be in summer. If possible, place your catalog orders before January.

Mapping my spring and summer plantings is one of my favorite mid-winter activities. Or at least that’s right after going over the seeds I collected in the fall and deciding who to share them with. For the really ambitious, a seed swap in the middle of winter would be a wonderful holiday. Some mundane but no less important tasks are mulching any flower beds that you may have missed in the fall, cleaning up any seeds you have kept and storing them away from rodents, and finally, polishing and sharpening your tools.

A final tradition, I would say, that bear emulation comes from Japan, where the solstice is called Toji and is considered a holy time for farmers. They welcome the return of the sun, essential to their harvests, by lighting bonfires and having a feast of rice and red beans. Every December 22, Mount Fuji is lit with these pockets of light to encourage the sun.

With the hustle and bustle of the November and December holidays, it’s always good for me to remember the midwinter tradition – a tradition that humans have held for eons – and that is to slow down, to do the point and remember that there are lighter days to come. Truly, there is light after darkness. Through the darkness there is again a path to the light.

Jackee Alston has been gardening and cultivating in the Flagstaff and Verde Valleys since 2005 and 2015, respectively. She is co-editor of the section Gardening, Etc., Maître Jardinière Coconino, founder of Grow Flagstaff! Seed Library, Development Specialist for the Rocky Mountain Seed Alliance, children’s author, and mother of three remarkable humans. She honors those whose land she now inhabits, including the Hohokam, Hopi, Western Apache, Pueblo, and Dine peoples.


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Rsula Corberó’s English lesson in the United States that arouses admiration in Spain – CVBJ https://disturbmedia.com/rsula-corberos-english-lesson-in-the-united-states-that-arouses-admiration-in-spain-cvbj/ Fri, 10 Dec 2021 01:07:30 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/rsula-corberos-english-lesson-in-the-united-states-that-arouses-admiration-in-spain-cvbj/ Related news Although the world knew her for her character in La casa de papel, in Spain Úrsula Corberó has been known since the age of 19 and he arrived at our place on time every week with the Physics or Chemistry series. Maybe it’s because of this, because we’ve watched her grow up as […]]]>

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Although the world knew her for her character in La casa de papel, in Spain Úrsula Corberó has been known since the age of 19 and he arrived at our place on time every week with the Physics or Chemistry series. Maybe it’s because of this, because we’ve watched her grow up as an actress, that her brilliant stint on The Tonight Show, the NBC hit show hosted by Jimmy Fallon, garnered unanimous applause. on social networks and a feeling of spanish pride rare.

The perfect pronunciation in English, her self-confidence in front of one of the greats of American television, her naturalness explaining the now famous anecdote with Madonna on a plane and her ability to grow while being in the same place as thousands of stars have taken care of the one she surely admires, made us see her with her mouth open and Twitter did not miss the opportunity to fall at her feet.

From the early morning of this Thursday the name of Úrsula Corberó topped the list of trends. Hundreds of thousands of people retweeted the video in which the Spanish actress recounted how Madonna looked herself in the eye on a Los Angeles-Madrid flight with a stopover in London before recognizing her and telling her how much she loved her the series, something that leaves her speechless:

However, Corberó not only climbed onto the trending topic because of the video itself, but also because of the thousands of reactions it elicited that could be summed up in just one: national pride. A wave of proud tweets – in keeping with the tradition of valuing our people more when they are valued, in turn, abroad – dusted off patriotic memes and their nicest adjectives to to boast of compatriot in the network.

So the “Perfect English” that the actress spoke in the interview was the most talked about of the day, but the tweeters also remembered her debut and praised the triumph of a Spanish series in the global film stronghold of the United States- United. Here are some of the tweets that praised the passage of Catalan on NBC:

She, for her part, shared several tweets from the program on Twitter, once again showing her humility and great sense of humor.



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Thousands of Guatemalans “burn the devil” in ancient tradition – CVBJ https://disturbmedia.com/thousands-of-guatemalans-burn-the-devil-in-ancient-tradition-cvbj/ Wed, 08 Dec 2021 02:13:52 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/thousands-of-guatemalans-burn-the-devil-in-ancient-tradition-cvbj/ Thousands of Guatemalans celebrated this Tuesday throughout the territory the “The devil burns», A secular tradition in which incinerate garbage in front of their homes, despite the authorities’ recommendation to the contrary. The activity, which has been repeated in dozens of streets across the Central American country, takes place every morning on December 7. Citizens […]]]>

Thousands of Guatemalans celebrated this Tuesday throughout the territory the “The devil burns», A secular tradition in which incinerate garbage in front of their homes, despite the authorities’ recommendation to the contrary.

The activity, which has been repeated in dozens of streets across the Central American country, takes place every morning on December 7.

Citizens participate in the fire of a five-meter devil. (Photo: ./Esteban Biba)

However, in recent years the participation of Guatemalans in the tradition has declined due to the recommendation of the authorities to do not burn garbage for the sake of the environment and for risks related to the activity.

“Many are burning old things, setting the garbage ablaze and this leads to risk and vulnerability,” Guatemala City spokesperson Amílcar Montejo said on Tuesday.

However, the authorities ask not to burn waste for the environment. (Photo: ./Esteban Biba)

The official recalled the importance of “protecting children” and the risks posed by the burning of garbage and piñatas “in the streets and avenues” with electric cables.

The Devil of 5 meters

A few kilometers from the center of Guatemala City, a giant devil’s piñata was burned by the inhabitants of a district in zone 5, one of the 25 zones that make up the metropolis.

The piñata was five meters high and weighed up to 400 pounds, as confirmed by the organizers at., Who also indicated that they baptized it as “Giammatute 2021“In honor of the Guatemalan President, Alejandro Giammattei, due to his mismanagement of the budget for vaccines against covid-19.

This tradition dates back to the announcement of the triumph of the Virgin of Concepción. (Photo: ./Esteban Biba)

For its part, the Guatemalan Exporters Association concluded a campaign on Tuesday urging the population to recycle in order to reduce pollution.

According to the Catholic view, the tradition dates back to the announcement of the triumph of the Virgin of Concepción, whose feast is celebrated on December 8, over Satan, which is commemorated with great bonfires and fireworks.

Guatemalan historians link the celebration to the days of the Spanish colony. (Photo: ./Esteban Biba)

Likewise, some Guatemalan historians link the celebration to the days of the Spanish colony, when large lights were made with fire for certain religious festivities.

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