Spanish tradition – Disturb Media http://disturbmedia.com/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 00:03:39 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://disturbmedia.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-6-120x120.png Spanish tradition – Disturb Media http://disturbmedia.com/ 32 32 Santa Barbra Unified School District Hires New San Marcos High School Principal and Two Other New Administrators https://disturbmedia.com/santa-barbra-unified-school-district-hires-new-san-marcos-high-school-principal-and-two-other-new-administrators/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 00:03:39 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/santa-barbra-unified-school-district-hires-new-san-marcos-high-school-principal-and-two-other-new-administrators/ SANTA BARBARA, Calif. — The Santa Barbara Unified School District has hired a new principal from San Marcos High School to fill a seat left vacant for just under a month, along with two other new administrators within the district. Former Dos Pueblos High School vice-principal Dare Holdren will replace former San Marcos principal Dr. […]]]>

SANTA BARBARA, Calif. — The Santa Barbara Unified School District has hired a new principal from San Marcos High School to fill a seat left vacant for just under a month, along with two other new administrators within the district.

Former Dos Pueblos High School vice-principal Dare Holdren will replace former San Marcos principal Dr. Kip Glazer, who announced his departure from the district in May.

Holdren himself is a graduate of San Marcos and a member of the school’s Athletics Hall of Fame, according to district spokesman Nick Masuda.

“Having the opportunity to lead the school where I not only graduated and taught for many years, and both my parents graduated from, at a time when I feel professionally and personally ready to take on such a revered and important position, is an absolute honor and privilege,” said Holdren.

Holdren spent more than 20 years with the district in various capacities and served as Principal of Solvang School for two years.

He holds a master’s degree in education from Chapman University and a bachelor’s degree in political science from Brown University.

The district also hired Dr. Lynne Sheffield to serve as the secondary’s assistant superintendent. She comes to the Central Coast from the Moreno Valley Unified School District where she was the director of student services.

She also served as director of student services in the Alhambra Unified School District and principal of Riverside and Perris High Schools for eight years, according to Masuda.

“I was intrigued by the district’s vision and mission statements,” Sheffield said.

“I have seen evidence of the commitment to equity and inclusion by observing board meetings and the state of our schools address. It was very inspiring to see the participation of students in the process and see the “student voice” in action.”

Sheffield has an Ed.D. in Organizational Leadership from the University of La Verne, a Master of Science in Administration from Pepperdine University, a Master of Arts in Education from Cal State Dominguez Hills, and a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Southern California.

Daniel Dupont was also promoted to principal of Santa Barbara Junior High School after serving as vice principal of Santa Barbara High School since 2019. He has eight years of experience as vice principal of the program between his time at Santa Barbara and El Dorado High School in the Placentia-Yorba Linda Unified School District.

“With 22 years of experience in public education, as a Spanish teacher for 14 years and the last eight years as an administrator, I am delighted to join the SBJH Condor family to continue the long tradition of incredible educational experiences that happen on campus every day,” said Dupont.

“I look forward to getting to know the entire SBJH community well and (to making sure) that every student, staff and community member who comes to campus feels welcomed, seen, safe and supported for helping our students succeed wherever SBJH life takes them.”

Dupont holds a master’s degree in instructional leadership from Cal State Fullerton and a bachelor’s degree in Spanish from UC Santa Barbara.

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The smaller, more low-key World Meeting of Families begins this week in Rome https://disturbmedia.com/the-smaller-more-low-key-world-meeting-of-families-begins-this-week-in-rome/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 07:31:14 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/the-smaller-more-low-key-world-meeting-of-families-begins-this-week-in-rome/ ROME — Adapted to the post-pandemic world, the traveling Catholic feast known as The World Meeting of Families will take place in Rome this week, but with events livestreamed around the world and many dioceses hosting events. Originally planned for 2021, to coincide with the 5e anniversary of the publication of Pope Francis’ encyclical on […]]]>

ROME — Adapted to the post-pandemic world, the traveling Catholic feast known as The World Meeting of Families will take place in Rome this week, but with events livestreamed around the world and many dioceses hosting events.

Originally planned for 2021, to coincide with the 5e anniversary of the publication of Pope Francis’ encyclical on the family, Amoris Laetitiathe event has been moved to June 22-26, 2022 due to the COVID-19 pandemic.


When the move was announced, the Vatican also said that at the request of Pope Francis, the event would not have the usual format where thousands of families flock to the host city. Instead, WMOF 2022 is by invitation only, mostly representatives of bishops’ conferences and church movements. The number of families present is estimated at 2,000.

The Dicastery for Laity, Family and Life has asked bishops’ conferences to include a limited number of married couples and families in their delegations, as well as clergy who have focused their ministry on marriages and families.

The Vatican strongly encourages all dioceses to celebrate the World Meeting by bringing families together for a personalized local experience of formation, prayer and fellowship.

The meeting will focus on the theme “Family love: a vocation and a path of holiness” and will mark the end of the Amoris Laetitia family year. The program in Rome and live includes Mass in St. Peter’s Basilica, conferences by lay Catholic couples, family activities and a live performance by the Italian operatic pop trio Il Volo.

Pope Francis will participate in three events: The Festival of Families, which will open the gathering on the afternoon of June 22; mass in St. Peter’s Square on Saturday evening June 25; and on Sunday he will address families at the Angelus and ask them to share what they have learned with others when they return home. If it respects the tradition, the city and the year of the next edition will be announced at that time.

“To prepare this new multicentric and generalized edition of the World Meeting, we had to face many challenges, starting with the pandemic, which delayed and complicated the organization, but we did it,” said Gabriella Gambino, under-secretary of the Dicastery. for Laity, Family and Life. “All over the world, so many dioceses are organizing themselves to bring families together around their bishop or parish priest: they are using the same scheme as the Meeting to be held in Rome”.

The first WMF was held in Rome in 1994, the year declared by the United Nations as the International Year of the Family. Pope John Paul II wanted the Catholic Church to join in the celebration, and among the proposed activities was the rally in Rome. It’s been going on since

So far, Francis has only taken place in two: in Philadelphia in 2015, which saw more than a million people attend the closing mass; and that of Dublin, which had a strong focus on protecting and preventing abuse due to the scale of the local clerical abuse crisis which had a strong impact on the Irish church.

In Rome, the meeting will take place in the Paul VI Hall, located in the Vatican, and where public weekly papal audiences are held when not in St. Peter’s Square. The episcopal conferences are responsible for financing the travel expenses of the 2,000 delegates.

Although in October the Vatican announced that it contribute when local churches could not afford travel expenses, Node saw a letter inviting a couple with several children to participate, but at their expense. And even if they managed to come, they only got two tickets for each event.

The Rome event will be streamed live and translated into English, Spanish, French, Portuguese and Italian as well as various forms of sign language. According to the program, it will cover topics ranging from educating young people about sexuality, being a Christian in the age of social media and families who suffer from domestic violence, to accompanying couples in their first year of marriage.

Another difference between this edition and previous editions is the decision not to have theologians and scholars giving lectures, but instead to have mostly married couples and only three priests. There are 30 panels in the list, with 62 speakers from 17 countries including the United States, Burundi, Brazil, Australia, Lebanon, Taiwan, and Indonesia. No cardinal or bishop is mentioned in the official program.

Follow Inés San Martín on Twitter: @inesanma


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SBCC calls on new Vice Presidents of Academic Affairs and Student Affairs | School zone https://disturbmedia.com/sbcc-calls-on-new-vice-presidents-of-academic-affairs-and-student-affairs-school-zone/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 16:00:00 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/sbcc-calls-on-new-vice-presidents-of-academic-affairs-and-student-affairs-school-zone/ Posted on June 18, 2022 | 09:00 Maria L. Villagomez Paloma Arnold The Santa Barbara Community College District Board of Trustees announced on June 16 that María L. Villagómez would be the new vice president of academic affairs and Paloma Arnold the new vice president of student affairs at the SBCC. “As we transition from […]]]>

Posted on June 18, 2022
| 09:00

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Maria L. Villagomez

Paloma Arnold
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Paloma Arnold

The Santa Barbara Community College District Board of Trustees announced on June 16 that María L. Villagómez would be the new vice president of academic affairs and Paloma Arnold the new vice president of student affairs at the SBCC.

“As we transition from an Executive Vice President structure to two Vice Presidents – one for Academic Affairs and the other for Student Affairs – we are thrilled that María, a recognized leader and innovator with more than 28 years of leadership experience, and Paloma, who has worked at CCSC for over 20 years and has led various student services over the years, will work closely together to better serve our students,” said Superintendent /Acting President Kindred Murillo.

Villagómez most recently served as Senior Dean of Library, Language Arts, Social Sciences, and Distance Education at Napa Valley College. She also taught Spanish language and literature classes at Napa Valley College for approximately 19 years, for which she won the McPherson Distinguished Teaching Award in 2015.

As a faculty member, she served as president, first vice president and grievance officer of the Faculty Association, and secretary and first vice president of the Academic Senate.

For nearly six years, Villagómez served as academic dean in the California community college system. In 2017, she completed the Association of California Community College Administrators (ACCCA) Great Deans Program and the Enrollment Management Academy hosted by Claremont University in conjunction with the Chancellor’s Office.

Both are prestigious programs designed for California community college administrators. Last year, she was named Administrative Employee of the Year by her colleagues in Napa Valley. She was also part of the first cohort to complete ALIVE Deans Academy, organized by California Community College Directors of Education (CCCCIO), which prepares deans of color for CIO roles.

“I am thrilled and honored to join Santa Barbara City College, and look forward to continuing SBCC’s tradition of excellence,” said Villagómez. “I am passionate about student success and ensuring that administrative decisions serve them fairly, both inside and outside the classroom.”

Villagómez holds a bachelor’s and master’s degree in Spanish linguistics and literature, as well as a second master’s degree in curriculum, teaching and learning with a specialization in instructional leadership. Her doctorate in education in instructional leadership is expected to be completed this year.

Arnold worked in student services at SBCC for approximately 20 years, most recently as Dean of Student Affairs, providing oversight to various student services departments and programs, including EOPS/CARE, CalWORKs, Guardian Scholars, Admissions and Records, Financial Aid, School Counseling, University Transfer Center, Transfer Success Program, Articulation, Foster Care and Foster Care Education, Enrollment and Retention Services, Dual Enrollment, and Federal Student Program work.

In 2019, Arnold was recognized as Outstanding Director of the Year by the SBCC Advancing Leadership Association.

“I feel extremely honored and thrilled to have the opportunity to serve as Vice President of Student Affairs at Santa Barbara City College,” Arnold said. “For the past 21 years, I have had the privilege of being part of the Student Services team at SBCC and I have a deep commitment, loyalty and love for our college and the students we serve. “

Arnold is a third-generation native of Santa Barbara and an alumnus of Santa Barbara High School. In the greater Santa Barbara community, she serves on the Board of Trustees of Riviera Ridge School (formerly Marymount School of Santa Barbara), the CalSOAP Board of Trustees, the Channel Youth and Family Services Board Islands YMCA and Cottage Hospital Community Health Advisory Committee.

She previously served on the Santa Barbara High School MAD Academy Board of Trustees. She holds a master’s degree in psychology from the University of Antioch, Santa Barbara, and a bachelor’s degree in history from UCLA.

Villagómez and Arnold are scheduled to begin serving in their new roles on July 1.

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Saint-Saëns: Revue Henry VIII – a lyrical rarity of epic proportions | Classical music https://disturbmedia.com/saint-saens-revue-henry-viii-a-lyrical-rarity-of-epic-proportions-classical-music/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 14:31:00 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/saint-saens-revue-henry-viii-a-lyrical-rarity-of-epic-proportions-classical-music/ VSamille Saint-Saëns composed 13 operas, but only one of them, Samson et Dalila, is now part of the regular repertoire. However, during the composer’s lifetime at least, Henry VIII, first seen in Paris in 1883, rivaled Samson in popularity; there have been performances across Europe, and although it has only been performed a handful of […]]]>

VSamille Saint-Saëns composed 13 operas, but only one of them, Samson et Dalila, is now part of the regular repertoire. However, during the composer’s lifetime at least, Henry VIII, first seen in Paris in 1883, rivaled Samson in popularity; there have been performances across Europe, and although it has only been performed a handful of times since Saint-Saëns’ death in 1921, it remains mostly performed from his other operas.

The libretto is based on Pedro Calderón de la Barca’s play La Cisma de Inglaterra (The Schism in England), although Saint-Saëns and his librettists also incorporated incidents and characters from Shakespeare’s Henry VIII. The action focuses on the English king’s determination to divorce Catherine of Aragon so that he can marry Anne Boleyn, and the split with the Roman church that brought about, although Calderón has introduced another dramatic element with the Spanish Ambassador Don Gómez de Feria’s love for Anne, and Catherine’s love. efforts to protect her rival from Henry’s jealousy. In many ways, Catherine, who dies at the end of the opera, is more obviously the central character than the king, and she is certainly the more sympathetic figure.

Saint-Saëns: cover of the Henri VIII album. Photography: Odyssey Recordings

Prior to the Paris premiere and for subsequent performances, Saint-Saëns’ original score was quite drastically cut and revised. But this recording is based on a concert given by Odyssey Opera in Boston, Massachusetts in 2019, using Hugh MacDonald’s restoration of the complete 1883 score, some of which had never been heard before. In this form, Henry VIII is a work of truly epic proportions, with over 220 minutes of music; one could qualify it as Wagnerian ambition, except that, even if it uses musical leitmotifs to define the protagonists, the conservative approach of Saint-Saëns’ opera is very far from that of Wagner, and owes much more to the world of Meyerbeer and the traditions of Parisian grand opera in the mid-19th century.

One can imagine that some of the music sounds more lively and engaging with bigger and brighter voices than those of the cast assembled by Odyssey Opera. But with baritone Michael Chioldi as King, soprano Ellie Dehn as Catherine and mezzo Hilary Ginther as Anne, all the main roles are very well performed, while the breadth and grandeur of the work’s set pieces – the finale of the first act, the ballet of the second and the synodal scene of the third – are certainly conveyed under the direction of Gil Rose. Lovers of lyrical rarities should not hesitate.

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Gibraltar row erupts as Spain CALLS on Britain to renegotiate ‘colonial situation’ | World | New https://disturbmedia.com/gibraltar-row-erupts-as-spain-calls-on-britain-to-renegotiate-colonial-situation-world-new/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 15:49:00 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/gibraltar-row-erupts-as-spain-calls-on-britain-to-renegotiate-colonial-situation-world-new/ Unlike other British Overseas Territories, Gibraltar was part of the EU before Brexit. The heavily militarized island, which has become a symbol of British naval might and nicknamed ‘The Rock’, voted overwhelmingly to remain in the EU, with 95% of voters choosing that option. Since the referendum, Spain’s acting foreign minister, José Manuel García-Margallo, has […]]]>

Unlike other British Overseas Territories, Gibraltar was part of the EU before Brexit. The heavily militarized island, which has become a symbol of British naval might and nicknamed ‘The Rock’, voted overwhelmingly to remain in the EU, with 95% of voters choosing that option. Since the referendum, Spain’s acting foreign minister, José Manuel García-Margallo, has renewed calls for joint Spanish-British control of the peninsula, and now the country is insisting that the UK come to the negotiating table. on Gibraltar.

In his annual address to the UN Decolonization Committee yesterday, Spanish Ambassador Agustín Santos reiterated that only negotiations between Madrid and London can overcome Gibraltar’s “colonial” status.

He added that they would always take into account “the interests of the people of the territory”.

Gibraltar’s Chief Minister, Fabián Picardo, insisted that “the people of Gibraltar” would not accept any proposed solution on their behalf and without their participation.

As the UK reached an agreement with Spain on December 31, 2020 that Gibraltar would serve as the basis for a subsequent agreement between the countries, Mr Santos said: “Nothing in this agreement implies a change in the legal position of Spain with regard to sovereignty and jurisdiction over Gibraltar.”

The ambassador added that beyond the question of sovereignty, Spain is open to “agreements with the United Kingdom that allow regional cooperation schemes for the direct benefit of the inhabitants on both sides of the fence under the idea of ​​shared prosperity”.

Gibraltar has expressed frustration that its future is determined by two countries other than itself.

In April 2017, Theresa May reiterated that “the UK would seek the best possible deal for Gibraltar as the UK leaves the EU, and there would be no negotiation over Gibraltar’s sovereignty without the consent of his people”.

At the UN committee, Mr. Picardo asked the organization to remove the Rock from the list of non-self-governing territories.

He insisted on Gibraltar’s right to self-determination, while adding that this would not include “avoiding cooperation with our neighbors despite our differences on fundamental issues”.

He added that Gibraltar’s former chief minister, Sir Joshua Hassan, claimed the same right before the committee 59 years ago.

Mr Picardo went on to say: “And, as long as we remain on the list of Non-Self-Governing Territories, we will always ensure that the voice of Gibraltarians is heard in this commission, despite the distance we have to travel for a brief hearing. .

“We are making the long journey to deliver this brief speech because the people of Gibraltar only want the exercise of their right to self-determination to be respected.

“We just want to be decolonized, because many countries in this room have been decolonized. We just want to exercise the same right they exercised.

“To this end, for 30 years, Madam President, we have repeatedly asked the Committee to visit Gibraltar. But he did not do it. »

READ MORE: EU deal ‘closed’ for Gibraltar as bloc refuses to budge on UK pact [REVEAL]

Mr Picardo concluded with a plea to commission chair Keisha Aniya McGuire: “Your commission must engage with Gibraltar. You must do more to get us off the list, and as soon as possible, because Gibraltar is our land, this is our home, and only our decisions will decide its future.”

In an address to the UN Committee of 24, the Chief Minister reiterated his demand, adding that Gibraltarians would never agree to be mere spectators of their own decolonisation.

He said Gibraltarians are the most committed, unbeatable and would not leave until they were removed from the list of Non-Self-Governing Territories.

Gibraltar wishes to maintain its good relations with Spain during the process.

Mr Picardo reiterated, while speaking on behalf of the Gibraltar Self-Determination Group, that during the Covid crisis when Gibraltar’s economy was ravaged like everyone else’s, he provided free vaccines to all legally registered Spanish frontier workers and paid full wages to each of them. in vacations.

DON’T MISS: Sophie Wessex takes on archery and hockey on Gibraltar tour [REVEAL]
Brexit trade disputes spill over to Europe over EU deal [INSIGHT]
“Spain bans entry to Gibraltar to put pressure on Britain? PM Probes Cleverly [ANALYSIS]

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Tottenham transfer news: Villarreal’s second signing target after Pau Torres swap talks | Soccer | sport https://disturbmedia.com/tottenham-transfer-news-villarreals-second-signing-target-after-pau-torres-swap-talks-soccer-sport/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 18:06:00 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/tottenham-transfer-news-villarreals-second-signing-target-after-pau-torres-swap-talks-soccer-sport/ Tottenham are targeting Villarreal’s much-loved left-back Pervis Estupinan as they look to continue their activities with the Champions League semi-finalists, according to reports in Spain. Earlier this week, Spurs held talks with their La Liga counterparts over a potential swap deal involving Giovani Lo Celso and Pau Torres. Villarreal are keen to land the Argentina […]]]>

Tottenham are targeting Villarreal’s much-loved left-back Pervis Estupinan as they look to continue their activities with the Champions League semi-finalists, according to reports in Spain. Earlier this week, Spurs held talks with their La Liga counterparts over a potential swap deal involving Giovani Lo Celso and Pau Torres.

Villarreal are keen to land the Argentina attacking midfielder on a permanent basis after a successful loan spell in the second half of last season.

Talks are continuing, with Tottenham also keen to explore a potential deal for Spain international defender Torres, who is also a target for Manchester United.

Spurs are yet to decide whether they will move forward for Torres following main target Alessandro Bastoni’s decision to stay at Inter Milan.

According to Spanish outlet MARCA, Estupinan is also a hot topic in North London and the full-back agent is already working on a deal.

Tottenham sources have since played down links to the player, insisting he is not an active target.

READ MORE: Tottenham ‘to make £26m swap offer’ for Alessandro Bastoni in latest transfer attempt

If Spurs were to strike a deal, it wouldn’t be Estupinan’s first spell in England.

The 24-year-old technically spent four seasons with Watford, although he didn’t appear for the Hornets after a series of loan spells with Granada, Algeria, Mallorca and Osasuna, where he really impressed during the 2019 season. /20.

His form encouraged Villarreal to move on and now the Yellow Submarine could be ready to offload at the right price.

Tottenham already have a number of options at left-back, most notably after signing Ivan Perisic on a free transfer from Inter Milan.

Ryan Sessegnon finished the season strong and remains a key part of Conte’s plans moving forward.

The same can’t be said for Sergio Reguilon, who will be sold this summer if a suitable offer arrives.

Perisic’s versatility and experience mean he should also play in attack for Tottenham, as well as at the back, where he thrived under Conte at the San Siro.

Matt Doherty is also expected to provide additional coverage at the back once he returns from his knee injury.

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Liverpool News: Darwin Nunez change “may have just been confirmed” by former club owner | Soccer | sport https://disturbmedia.com/liverpool-news-darwin-nunez-change-may-have-just-been-confirmed-by-former-club-owner-soccer-sport/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 07:50:00 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/liverpool-news-darwin-nunez-change-may-have-just-been-confirmed-by-former-club-owner-soccer-sport/ Darwin Nunez’s highly anticipated move to Liverpool may have been confirmed early on by the owner of his former club Almeria. Turki Alalshikh has hit Reds fans with a social media post suggesting the Uruguayan’s announcement is imminent, just like the windfall the Spanish side are set to receive. Liverpool’s move for Nunez has progressed […]]]>

Darwin Nunez’s highly anticipated move to Liverpool may have been confirmed early on by the owner of his former club Almeria. Turki Alalshikh has hit Reds fans with a social media post suggesting the Uruguayan’s announcement is imminent, just like the windfall the Spanish side are set to receive.

Liverpool’s move for Nunez has progressed rapidly over the past few days, and reports indicate that virtually every aspect of the deal has already been agreed. A Bola claims Benfica have accepted the proposed fee, which could reach £85m, and the player himself has given the green light to a move to Anfield despite being out on international duty with Uruguay.

Manchester United are said to have considered attempting a late diversion, but given the possibility of a costly bidding war and the player’s supposed preference for Champions League football, the Red Devils now appear set to back down.

And Almeria owner Turki Alalshikh suggested the deal could already be done with a social media post showing Nunez mocked up in a Liverpool kit. Alalshikh has a vested interest in the proceedings, as his side are to pocket 20% of the final costs.

JUSTINE: Gareth Southgate responds to Gary Lineker over criticism of Trent Alexander-Arnold England

Nunez scored 16 league goals for Almeria in Spain’s second tier in 2019/20, prompting Benfica to shell out around £20m to bring him to Portugal. Alalshikh and co could be set to pocket an additional £17m on top of that based on the £85m deal announced by Liverpool.

The Uruguayan took a while to fold at Benfica but stepped up his goalscoring exploits last season when he racked up an impressive 34 goals in all competitions. Jurgen Klopp has apparently seen enough to try and break Liverpool’s transfer record, which remains the £75million paid to Southampton for Virgil van Dijk.

READ MORE: Tottenham ‘agree £20m deal’ to sign Djed Spence

Locking down one of Europe’s hottest strikers in Nunez would be a way to address Manchester City’s move to Erling Haaland, who is set to light up the Premier League next season. Klopp wasted no time in taking action to make up for Sadio Mane’s departure, with Bayern Munich set to return with an improved offer after ‘insulting’ the Reds last time out.

Mohamed Salah is entering the final year of his contract at Anfield, so the Liverpool hierarchy have clearly acted on their cue to plan accordingly. Nunez is still only 22 and Klopp has a great track record of pushing promising forwards to the next level.

And the German may have had Nunez in his sights for a while. Klopp watched the youngster up close and personal when he scored home and away against the Reds in the Champions League last season.

“I knew that before, of course, but he played pretty much ahead of me with his tough fights with Ibrahima Konaté (in the first leg),” he said at the time. “He was physically strong, fast, calm at the finish. Good, really good. I always say that in these situations, if he is healthy, a great career awaits him.”

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Wichita businessman and veteran launch Democratic campaign challenging U.S. Rep. Estes https://disturbmedia.com/wichita-businessman-and-veteran-launch-democratic-campaign-challenging-u-s-rep-estes/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 15:19:37 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/wichita-businessman-and-veteran-launch-democratic-campaign-challenging-u-s-rep-estes/ TOPEKA — Wichita military veteran and businessman Bob Hernandez filed a Democratic candidacy for the U.S. House in the 4th District on Thursday, represented by Republican Congressman Ron Estes. Hernandez, who served in the U.S. Army and deployed to Germany, was deployed to Iraq from 2007 to 2009 as a logistics specialist with the Kansas […]]]>

TOPEKA — Wichita military veteran and businessman Bob Hernandez filed a Democratic candidacy for the U.S. House in the 4th District on Thursday, represented by Republican Congressman Ron Estes.

Hernandez, who served in the U.S. Army and deployed to Germany, was deployed to Iraq from 2007 to 2009 as a logistics specialist with the Kansas Army National Guard. He operates KS Amigos, a concierge business in Wichita, and previously published a Spanish-language magazine serving the Wichita area.

Hernandez said in a campaign ad that he was bothered. Estes described the January 6, 2021, assault on the U.S. Capitol as “peaceful.”

Amid the transfer of power from President Donald Trump and President Joe Biden, a crowd pushed through security into the Capitol where federal lawmakers were taking procedural votes to certify the election. A 35-year-old Air Force veteran was fatally shot by a Capitol Police officer, while 138 officers were injured. The US Department of Justice arrested and charged more than 800 people with rioting on January 6.

“I’ve served our nation twice overseas,” Hernandez said. “Excusing the aggressive and destructive conduct we witnessed on January 6, 2021 is a slap in the face to every serviceman and woman and, frankly, every American.”

Hernandez said he filed in the 4th District because Kansas people deserve answers to leadership issues in Washington, D.C.

“Ron Estes can spend the rest of the year trying to explain his lack of patriotism,” Hernandez said, “and we’ll see if people buy him.”

Estes’ staff in Wichita and Washington were unavailable to comment on Hernandez’s claims about the Capitol riots.

Hernandez enlisted in the military in 1972 and was deployed to Germany until 1978. He graduated from Garden City Community College and Wichita State University before working as an investment adviser for Merrill Lynch. He enlisted in the National Guard after the Andover tornado in 1991. He was in Iraq supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom.

His campaign was announced ahead of Thursday’s televised congressional hearing on the Jan. 6 insurrection on Capitol Hill that has imperiled the tradition of the peaceful transfer of presidential power. A U.S. House select committee investigated Trump’s “Stop the Steal” campaign, which was based on unsubstantiated allegations of voter fraud and an attempt to undermine Biden’s victory over Trump.

Estes, who served as Kansas state treasurer from 2011 to 2017, has represented the 4th District since April 2017. He was originally elected to replace U.S. Representative Mike Pompeo, who resigned to work in the Trump administration. Previously, Estes served as Sedgwick County Treasurer.

In January 2021, the six-member federal delegation from Kansas condemned the violence on Capitol Hill. Estes, who has advanced allegations of fraud in the 2020 election, said the federal government must “hold accountable those who committed these acts of violence.”

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Shame on American academics, writers for intellectual imperialism against Haitians  https://disturbmedia.com/shame-on-american-academics-writers-for-intellectual-imperialism-against-haitians-%ef%bf%bc/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 00:18:53 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/shame-on-american-academics-writers-for-intellectual-imperialism-against-haitians-%ef%bf%bc/ Haitian weatherwww.haitiantimes.com By Celucien L. Joseph, PhD Chains were once used to restrain enslaved Haitians in a museum in the capital. Photo by Federico Rios for The New York Times American academia produces some of the most arrogant and selfish scholars and thinkers in the world. Because most American scholars and historians write and publish […]]]>

Haitian weather
www.haitiantimes.com
By Celucien L. Joseph, PhD

Chains were once used to restrain enslaved Haitians in a museum in the capital. Photo by Federico Rios for The New York Times

American academia produces some of the most arrogant and selfish scholars and thinkers in the world. Because most American scholars and historians write and publish in English, published works by Haitian, Caribbean, African, or other black writers—who write in French or Spanish—are deemed worthy of intellectual merit only when they are written in English. These American scholars do not rate the quality of scholarship or the quality of research, only their own ability to process information in English.

This attitude is nothing but the intellectual imperialism at stake. This pernicious perspective is rooted in the politics of the American Empire as a means of undermining the intellectual and literary productions of writers and historians of the Global South or the developing world. Haiti, because of its complex history with the United States and the West, as well as with American and Western scholars and writers, is one of the first victims of this intellectual climate.

Over the years, I have watched American scholars and writers not bother to quote Haitian writers who had been writing about an issue for decades.

I mean come on, good people: how can you pretend that no one in Haiti has written about Haitian national history or Haitian intellectual history from the 18th to the 20th century? Just because you’re writing in English for an American audience doesn’t mean you should disengage from a body of scholarship produced in a different language. It is intellectual dishonesty not to give credit or acknowledge intellectual predecessors.

American scholars: Stop ignoring writers who publish scholarly productions in their native language. Shame on you for not legitimizing Haitian studies because it’s not in English. Too bad to think that only you can humanize the Haitian people because you write in English about Haiti and the Haitian experience. I am not referring to writers born in Haiti or those of Haitian descent who write or produce in English. That’s not my point here.

Unfortunately, in American academia, the production of academic work in English comes with an academic right or pedigree. It brings a lot of academic privilege and reputation because the English language has now become more tied to politics and the expansion of the United States as the most powerful country and empire in the world today.

Fluency in English is not synonymous with intelligence

However, fluency in English does not naturally make you smarter. I know it’s a popular attitude among Americans, even among some American academics, that speaking or writing in English is linked to high civilization or culture, intelligence, and fame. Such an attitude must disappear. Let’s stop this colonial practice, as Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o urges us to do in “Decolonizing the Mind”.

After all, no one else expects American academics to be fluent in French, Spanish, Kreyòl, Swahili, Swahili, Yoruba, Igbo, Fulani, or any other language your mother tongue: English. The least you can do, if you are going to work or specialize in a non-English speaking country as a scholar or academic specialist, you should try to “read in translation” or even “quote in translation”. Or you can seek help from an expert.

It is interesting to note that American scholars do not express the same attitude towards French, German or English writers or historians when writing about the history and experience of Western countries.

How to advance and change this bad academic practice in the American intellectual or academic landscape? First, realize that Haitian writers and historians have written prolifically and produced good works on some key issues of Haitian national history. To name a few: the Haitian Revolution, Haiti’s colonial history/slavery and colonization in Haiti, economic exploitation of Haiti by France, military occupation and invasion in Haiti, the rise of Haitian radicalism and Marxism in the 20th century, the rise of the feminist movement in Haiti, the Duvalier regime, Haitian anthropology and ethnology, and NGO politics in Haiti.

For each historical period, I can list 30 to 45 influential writers and thinkers to know, especially those published in French. Many more thinkers are on my list alone.

Remember, the scholarship is a team effort

I wrote this post in response to a series of The Ransom articles published in The New York Times. For academia, the main takeaway here is that academic research is a team effort that engages the work of other academics, for which I am grateful. In other words, no one works in isolation and no one can claim an intellectual monopoly in academic studies, research and epistemology. Yet we should not ignore those who write from the margins and work primarily in the context of a developing country in the Global South. Their work matters! Their ideas are worth quoting — in English! Their contribution deserves public recognition.

We have a Haitian canon, built on existing traditions – intellectual practices, ways of thinking, perceiving and interpreting the Haitian world and other worlds of Haitian history – which encompass various worldviews, fields of study and areas of the human and Haitian experience. Likewise, since the birth of Haiti in 1804, the country has seen many movements that have shaped the human experience in Haiti. Haitian writers and historians have documented their own histories and histories, experiences and living conditions, and these literary recipes could be traced to the country’s first writing: Haiti’s Declaration of Independence on January 1, 1804.

Clearly, Haitian writers have not been silenced about the Haitian experience in the world. Nor should the world, America in particular, erase this tradition of Haitian scholarship.

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Celucien L. Joseph, PhD, is an associate professor of English at Indian River State College. His most recent books include Between two worlds: Jean Price-Mars, Haiti and Africa (2018) and Revolutionary Change and Democratic Religion: Christianity, Voodoo and Secularism (2020). He is secretary of the board of directors of Haitian Studies Association.

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how El Greco became Picasso’s “first love” https://disturbmedia.com/how-el-greco-became-picassos-first-love/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 08:26:31 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/how-el-greco-became-picassos-first-love/ Was El Greco the first cubist? Was Picasso the last Old Master? These are the questions that hover over a new mix-and-match approach by the two artists which opens this month at the Kunstmuseum Basel, where the exhibition Picasso-El Greco traces the impact of the Greek painter based in Spain on his Spanish admirer based […]]]>

Was El Greco the first cubist? Was Picasso the last Old Master? These are the questions that hover over a new mix-and-match approach by the two artists which opens this month at the Kunstmuseum Basel, where the exhibition Picasso-El Greco traces the impact of the Greek painter based in Spain on his Spanish admirer based in France.

Doménikos Theotokópoulos (1541-1614), as El Greco often signed his paintings, was trained as an icon painter in his native Crete, then a center of Byzantine art in exile and a colony of the Venetian Republic. After a stopover in Venice proper and a thwarted start to his career in papal Rome, he traveled to Spain, settling in the city of Toledo after failing to impress Spain’s King Philip II with his extravagant approach to the religious painting.

Successful in his lifetime as an artist for hire, El Greco was forgotten soon after his death, and it seems that a coterie of 19th-century French artists and writers, notably Édouard Manet and Paul Cézanne, rediscovers and promotes him as a harbinger of all things modern. It was this French idealization of El Greco that returned to the Spain of the young Pablo Picasso (1881-1973), whose blue period incorporated the elongated figures and darkly glowing palette of the old master.

El Greco Adoration of the Name of Jesus (1577-79) and Pablo Picasso Evocation (The Burial of Casagemas) (1901) National heritage. Real Collections. El Escorial / © Picasso Estate; Paris Museum of Modern Art

The upcoming exhibition will consist of around thirty strategic pairs of works by the two artists, largely retracing the chronology of Picasso’s artistic development. The Blue Period section will combine Adoration of the Name of Jesus (circa 1577-79) with Picasso Evocation (The Burial of Casagemas)a 1901 oil painting of the suicide of his friend, Catalan artist Carlos Casagemas.

The ideal match for Evocation would be the work that directly inspired him, the monumental painting of the 1580s by El Greco Burial of the Count of Orgaz, which is permanently housed in the Iglesia de Santo Tomé in Toledo. But El Greco’s two works delight in stylistic excess, and each is compositionally opposed, as Picasso does in Evocationa draft up with a tug down.

Picasso’s early debt to El Greco has long been recognised, but it has also been speculated that his interest in the Old Master gave way to other influences, notably preclassical Iberian art, which helped him transition from blue and rose periods to his Cubist Revolution, and completely vanished in Picasso’s last decades. Carmen Giménez, the show’s senior curator, says El Greco was not just a childhood crush, but a lifelong commitment. “El Greco was Picasso’s first love,” says Giménez. “And a first love always has a freshness.”

El Greco St.Paul (circa 1585) and Picasso The Aficionado (1912) Private collection / Kunstmuseum Basel Martin P. Bühler

The centerpiece of the exhibition will be associations of expressive depictions of saints by El Greco with high-level Cubist works, including St.Paul (circa 1585), on loan from a private collection, associated with that of Basel The hobbyist (1912), a key work of Analytical Cubism.

The very unconventional portraits of El Greco came to have a particular appeal for early modernists, and the final section of the exhibition will combine the portraits of El Greco Portrait of a Man from the House of Leiva (circa 1580-85), whose direct gaze is still a little shocked, with Picasso’s 1967 cartoon homage to his favorite Old Masters, The Musketeerbearing the subtitle Domenico Theotocopulos van Rijn da Silva, in honor of El Greco, Rembrandt and Velázquez. Cubism may have been a disruption of centuries of Western art, but the Basel exhibition argues that Picasso’s break with tradition was actually a continuation in other ways.

Meanwhile, in London, a small exhibition at the National Gallery focuses on the influence of Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres. Picasso spent the latter part of his career obsessively revisiting a few works by Eugène Delacroix and Velázquez, but one of his most successful encounters with an earlier masterpiece came in 1932, with woman with a bookamazed portrait of his young mistress, Marie-Thérèse Walter, directly inspired by the Second Empire portrait of Ingres from 1856, the sumptuous Ms Moitessier.

Picasso had seen Ingres’ painting, now a National Gallery landmark work, at an exhibition in the early 1920s, and his obsession paid off a decade later in Walter’s portrait, now at the Norton Simon Pasadena Museum. The London exhibition – which will later travel to Norton Simon – brings together the works for the first time and joins Basel in championing Picasso as the great torchbearer of art history rather than a flamethrower eternal of modernism.

Picasso-El GrecoKunstmuseum Basel, June 11-September 25

Picasso Ingres: Face to FaceNational Gallery, London, June 3-October 9

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