Spanish tradition – Disturb Media http://disturbmedia.com/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 17:27:51 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://disturbmedia.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-6-120x120.png Spanish tradition – Disturb Media http://disturbmedia.com/ 32 32 Bullfighting is still as important in the south of France, waiting to spoil a good holiday https://disturbmedia.com/bullfighting-is-still-as-important-in-the-south-of-france-waiting-to-spoil-a-good-holiday/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 15:19:00 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/bullfighting-is-still-as-important-in-the-south-of-france-waiting-to-spoil-a-good-holiday/ France is once again anguished by bullfighting. Like Scottish independence, the foxhunting ban and the relegation of Morecambe FC to Britain, the problem never quite goes away – then bursts to the surface when you’d rather wish it had he is not. This time, television journalist and left-wing MP Aymeric Caron has tabled a bill […]]]>

France is once again anguished by bullfighting. Like Scottish independence, the foxhunting ban and the relegation of Morecambe FC to Britain, the problem never quite goes away – then bursts to the surface when you’d rather wish it had he is not. This time, television journalist and left-wing MP Aymeric Caron has tabled a bill in parliament banning all bullfighting, to be considered this week.

Caron believes that bullfighting is “a despicable practice that dishonours us all”. He is not alone. A poll earlier this year suggested that 77% of French people were opposed. They include Anouk Aimée, Alain Delon, Brigitte Bardot and Pamela Anderson, so Caron has the right veterans on his side. Antis took to the streets in cities across France last weekend to support the bill, expressing their anger at what they see as a barbaric practice. The writer Christian Laborde suggested in The world that “arenas are very noisy cemeteries”.

The demonstrations were echoed by those of bullfighting supporters – more numerous it seems – decrying an attack on an essentially southern tradition by distraught Parisians. “The bullfighting (bull culture) is our identity, a living culture. Let’s be free to live with our traditions,” said Julien Dubois, mayor of Dax, a bullfighting city if ever there was one. He could apparently call on the support of Eric Cantona, Zinedine Zidane and former French prime ministers Lionel Jospin, Alain Juppé and Jean Castex.

The chase arrived in France in the mid-19th century, as part of the baggage of Empress Eugenie, the Spanish wife of Napoleon III. It spread mainly in the south, from western Provence to present-day Occitania and New Aquitaine.

He is, in fact, legally confined to these regions, and not just anywhere in these regions either. To organize a bullfight, a town or village must also demonstrate an “uninterrupted bullfighting tradition”. Bullfighting is thought to be cruel – the French penal code says so – but they’ve been doing it forever in the south, so let them. We will make an exception. So right now bullfighting is legal in Nîmes but not in Montpellier (where there haven’t been bullfights for years), let alone in, say, Lille in northern France.

I’m not a natural audience for bullfighting, just as I’m not for bear fighting, cockfighting, or heavyweight boxing. But I really fell in pursuit when, a very long time ago, I went to see Marie-Sara, then blonde and bullfighter on horseback of extravagant beauty, or rejoneadora as we say in aficionado circles. (The least irritating aspect of French bullfighting isn’t its exclusive use of Spanish.)

In the Roman arenas of Nîmes, Marie-Sara – then the world’s most famous bullfighter – was squeezed into the tightest costume possible and handled her horse with spellbinding skill and astonishing courage, first to taunt, then to shoot the bull. It was disturbing on more levels than I could count. Later, however, I saw some noviladas, fights during which aspiring bullfighters confront young bulls. At one o’clock, in Arles, the young man might as well have tackled the bull with garden shears for all the artistic talent on display.

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USC’s first multilingual film festival https://disturbmedia.com/uscs-first-multilingual-film-festival/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/uscs-first-multilingual-film-festival/ USC’s Center for Languages ​​and Cultures held its first multilingual film festival, showcasing 6 student short films and handing out prizes at the end of the event. (Photo courtesy of Evgeny Dengub) Student filmmakers and language teachers gathered at Taper Hall Wednesday night for USC’s first multilingual film festival. The screening of six short films […]]]>
USC’s Center for Languages ​​and Cultures held its first multilingual film festival, showcasing 6 student short films and handing out prizes at the end of the event. (Photo courtesy of Evgeny Dengub)

Student filmmakers and language teachers gathered at Taper Hall Wednesday night for USC’s first multilingual film festival. The screening of six short films in six different languages ​​ended with laughter, applause and support from the multilingual community, truly demonstrating how learning other languages ​​and cultures can bring people together.

The Multilingual Film Festival was hosted by the Center for Languages ​​and Cultures and organized by its Community Outreach Committee as an initiative to raise awareness of the importance of studying foreign languages, particularly to cultivate appreciation and understanding of other cultures. Professor Maria Mercedes Fages Agudo, Spanish lecturer and chair of the community outreach program, explained that the organizers chose to organize a film festival because of the accessibility of the medium.

“We thought ‘These days, you know, students are walking around with their phones, and they’re always photographing, recording videos, watching TikTok,’ so it seemed like the natural transition would be to ask them to produce a video where they were using the target language we use in the classroom, but outside of their normal four walls,” said Fages Agudo.

As spectators and filmmakers rushed to the event, they were warmly welcomed by either Professor Fages Agudo or Evgeny Dengub, Russian teacher and director of the Center for Languages ​​and Cultures.

“I hope that [audience members] will take away that language is fun and that using a foreign language is not just something they do in class when studying a verb or conjugations, but it is something that helps them discover and open their creative potential and bring more joy to the world,” Dengub said.

While staff prepared for the screening, Professor Dengub taught the audience of around 40 people how to say “Hello” in the six languages ​​represented at the Film Festival: Arabic, Chinese, German, Hebrew, Russian and Spanish.

After the opening remarks, the movies started playing. The theme for the film festival was “A Day in the Life of a USC Student”, which Professor Fage Agudo said was chosen for its universality.

“Teaching so many languages ​​at so many different levels, how could we find a subject that could be the same for all the languages ​​we teach?” said Professor Fages Agudo. “We thought it would be easy to connect with ‘A Day in the Life of a Student’.

The first was the Arabic-language film, “Empty,” directed by Faatima Abdul-Aziz, a sophomore majoring in law, history and culture, and Anthony Khoory, a sociology graduate. Khoory explained that their video about an aspiring actress and her strained relationship with her husband was inspired by the style of Arabic soap operas.

“I watched the Arabic musalsal, which are TV dramas,” Khoory said, “and we actually used the theme song from a Turkish show…and used the idea of ​​divorce, big family topics and ‘cultural elements’.

Next is the Chinese-language film, “The Power of Chinese”, directed by Yana Savitsky, a second-year student in Media Arts and Practices, Vihan Raj, a student in Computer Science, Rich Qian, a second-year student in Cognitive Science and David Zhang. , a junior specializing in the design of games and interactive media. Their film explores a rivalry between two students in a Chinese class and how their competition escalates into comic effect.

After that, there was the German-language film, “Stress Traum,” directed by Justin Compy, a sophomore majoring in film and media studies, and Schuyler Gebhardt, a senior majoring in history. Their film follows a student studying for a test in his German class who falls asleep and has a nightmare about the exam.

Next is the Hebrew-language film, “End,” directed by Jack Yonover, a second-year philosophy student. His film tells the story of a student going through his day, struggling with a sense of hopelessness.

Then the Russian-language film, “How to Find Friends in Strange Circumstances,” directed by Marguerite Bysshe, a freshman majoring in intelligence and cyber operations, Christopher Keating, a theater major, Claire Fausett, junior in international relations and Russian, Sophia Wittmeier, a major in intelligence and cyber operations, and Christopher Gunning, a major in Russian, were streamed. The video is about a Russian language student who transforms into the Russian cartoon character “Cheburashka” after studying the character for a project.

Bysshe, the group’s director, explained the motivation behind their film. “I know I wanted to do something funny and I love Cheburashka…I learned [him] in my high school Russian class.

Finally, the film in Spanish “J’aime USC!” directed by Alana Bright, a junior theater student, and Bianca Novak, a junior health promotion and disease prevention student, was screened. Their film documented their day as USC students.

Throughout, the audience cheered and laughed, showing their support for each other’s works. Subsequently, Professor Fages Agudo and Professor Dengub organized a popular vote, won by “How to find friends in strange circumstances”.

After the public decided the winner of the Popular Choice award, a separate awards ceremony was held to celebrate the films. The winners were chosen by a judging panel from the Community Outreach Committee and presented by fellow teacher, Steven Gonzalez. Gonzalez explained that the films demonstrated the strength of the language program at USC.

Of those awards, Best Actor went to Abdul-Aziz and Khoory for “Empty.” Best Cinematography went to “Stress Traum”. The funniest movie went to “How to Find Friends in Strange Circumstances”. Best Picture went to “Stress Traum” in third, “Empty” in second, and “How to Find Friends in Strange Circumstances” in first.

The winners received small Oscar-worthy statues for their victories and photos were taken. The audience again applauded all the filmmakers and the evening ended with a quiz for free T-shirts which, although competitive, was a lot of fun.

With the success of this multilingual film festival, Professor Dengub hopes the initiative will become an annual event and that even more students from the 15 languages ​​offered at USC will participate, stressing that the medium of film can help learners overcome language barriers.

“The language of cinema is pretty much universal,” Professor Dengub said, “and with the help of subtitles you can really, you know, make a movie in any language and enjoy [it].”

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Mayor’s Office – News – Articles – November 2022 – 2022-11-17 TOWN CELEBRATES COMPLETION OF $4.5 MILLION LAKE VISTA ROADS PROJECT https://disturbmedia.com/mayors-office-news-articles-november-2022-2022-11-17-town-celebrates-completion-of-4-5-million-lake-vista-roads-project/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 20:45:04 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/mayors-office-news-articles-november-2022-2022-11-17-town-celebrates-completion-of-4-5-million-lake-vista-roads-project/ November 14, 2022 | From the city of New Orleans CITY CELEBRATES COMPLETION OF $4.5 MILLION ROAD WORKS PROJECT IN LAKE VISTA NEW ORLEANS – Mayor LaToya Cantrell was joined today by District Council Member D Eugene Green, Acting Department of Public Works (DPW) Director Sarah McLaughlin Porteous and the Sewer and Water Board of […]]]>

November 14, 2022 | From the city of New Orleans

CITY CELEBRATES COMPLETION OF $4.5 MILLION ROAD WORKS PROJECT IN LAKE VISTA

NEW ORLEANS – Mayor LaToya Cantrell was joined today by District Council Member D Eugene Green, Acting Department of Public Works (DPW) Director Sarah McLaughlin Porteous and the Sewer and Water Board of New Orleans (SWBNO) Acting General Superintendent Ron Spooner for a ribbon-cutting ceremony to celebrate the completion of an 8-block, $4.5 million project on Spanish Fort Boulevard. This project was funded by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and is part of the City’s Joint Infrastructure Recovery Response (JIRR) program in partnership with the SWBNO.

“Despite the challenges we face, today is an example of another crucial victory for our city,” said Mayor LaToya Cantrell. “Investing in infrastructure to create a more resilient and sustainable city remains a priority not only for my administration, but also for our residents, businesses and visitors. Coordinating these investments in our neighborhoods is not without challenges. However, this work and investment is necessary, and we thank residents for their patience and vigilance as we continue to make progress on roadwork projects across the city. »

Scope of work includes repaving the asphalt pavement from curb to curb, repairing the pavement with asphalt, repairing damaged sidewalks and entrance aprons, installing ramps Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) compliant curb strips at intersections and replacement and repair of damaged groundwater, sewer and drainage lines.

“It is good to see continued progress on infrastructure repairs in our city, as is being done with the completion of this Lake Vista Group B roadworks project,” said Member of the green board. “This project and other recently completed street repair projects involve more than just putting a new surface on an old one. Comprehensive repairs on Spanish Fort Boulevard, including updates and replacements of sewer and water lines, will reduce the likelihood of short- and long-term flooding, allow favorable longer-term wear of surface and reduce the need to return for additional repairs or upgrades. This is good news for our city and this community.

“We are here to celebrate the progress that has been made here at Lake Vista,” said Porteous. “We also want to focus on how to continue to make our ongoing citywide projects as painless as possible for all of our residents. Currently, we are working on 55 roads, encompassing 2,800 city blocks, with a construction value of $615 million. All of these projects will provide better overall services to our residents.

Today’s groundbreaking ceremony demonstrates the Cantrell administration’s priority to improve the City’s aging infrastructure. Over the next year, construction is expected to begin on more than $1 billion in additional JIRR projects.

“Today, we stand with our administration and our neighbors in applauding another collaborative rebuilding project, this time in our Lake Vista neighborhood,” said spoon. “We are proud to work with our partners in the City of New Orleans to emphasize a proactive replacement culture when it comes to our aging infrastructure. These efforts of the Joint Infrastructure Recovery Request (JIRR) program are an excellent example of our commitment to infrastructure resilience and reliability.

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35 of the best alternative cities in the United States for an urban escape https://disturbmedia.com/35-of-the-best-alternative-cities-in-the-united-states-for-an-urban-escape/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 19:40:43 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/35-of-the-best-alternative-cities-in-the-united-states-for-an-urban-escape/ 7. Santa Fe, Albuquerque and Taos, New Mexico Why go: Experiencing an authentic New Mexico means learning more about its native history. Fortunately, there are many possibilities to do so. The state is home to 19 Pueblo tribes, each a sovereign nation whose reach once stretched as far as Colorado and Arizona. Today, […]]]>

7. Santa Fe, Albuquerque and Taos, New Mexico

Why go: Experiencing an authentic New Mexico means learning more about its native history. Fortunately, there are many possibilities to do so. The state is home to 19 Pueblo tribes, each a sovereign nation whose reach once stretched as far as Colorado and Arizona. Today, their influence lives on not only in the old villages away from everyday life, but on every street corner.

Santa Fe, like many cities in the state, is filled with beautiful adobe buildings built in the Puebloan style, which was copied by Spanish settlers. Even the city governors palace, which dates back to the founding of Santa Fe in 1610, was built this way. It has been modified over the years, but remains the oldest European-built public building in the United States and in continuous use. Elsewhere in the city, you’ll see plenty of adobe-style (“faux-dobe”) reconstructions, but the past is everywhere in this small capital of 80,000 people where cultures – Spanish, Mexican, Puebloan – mingle through the food , art, festivals and religion.

This is not to give the impression that Santa Fe exists in a historic bubble. It has a thriving foodie scene (chillies are a culinary genre in their own right here) and an outdoor vibe, with skiing, hiking and rock climbing on offer in the surrounding Sangre de Cristo range. Indeed, at 2,195 m above sea level, the city is the highest state capital in the United States. It was these landscapes that captivated artist Georgia O’Keeffe, who lived here in her later years. A downtown museum dedicated to his work is to relocate and triple in size, with some chance of opening in 2025. Santa Fe is also a hotbed of Puebloan art, and its 250 galleries have become a mecca for collectors, while the Museum of New Mexico oversees a number of institutions in a city where Native history and folk art often take center stage.

Puebloan influence extends throughout the state. Pueblos (villages) surround the cities of Santa Fe and also Albuquerque, a city whose annual Hot Air Balloon Festival (October) sees hundreds of balloons decorate the sky above the Sandia Mountains. Albuquerque’s Indian Pueblo Cultural Center offers a good introduction to local history, but it’s in Taos, further north, that you’ll find the oldest native community. The five-story adobe complexes here, thought to have been completed between AD 1000 and 1450, still look much as they did when the Spaniards first encountered them.

In the 20th century, Taos became a bohemian escape for artists and thinkers. There are some excellent Hispanic art museums in town, while the alien-like Earthships nod to the more ideological aspects of alien life. A fitting end to any visit.

Also see: Ride the Sandia Peak Tramway from Albuquerque, which offers sweeping views of the valley below from a height of 3,165m.

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Illini Softball adds three on National Signing Day https://disturbmedia.com/illini-softball-adds-three-on-national-signing-day/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 20:59:12 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/illini-softball-adds-three-on-national-signing-day/ History links CHAMPAGNE, Ill. – The Illinois softball program announced the signing of three student-athletes to National Letters of Intent on Wednesday, November 9. Adisyn Caryl, Eileen Donahue and Delaney Mosley join the Orange and Blue class of 2023. 2023 SOFTBALL ILLINI SIGNING CLASS Adisyn Caryl // Topeka, Kansas // Topeka […]]]>

CHAMPAGNE, Ill. – The Illinois softball program announced the signing of three student-athletes to National Letters of Intent on Wednesday, November 9. Adisyn Caryl, Eileen Donahue and Delaney Mosley join the Orange and Blue class of 2023.

2023 SOFTBALL ILLINI SIGNING CLASS

Adisyn Caryl // Topeka, Kansas // Topeka High School // Aces Fastpitch // Infield // 5-9

Remarks: Named First Team All-Conference in 2021 and 2022… Earned First Team All-City honors in 2021 and 2022… Earned First Team All-State (6A) honor in 2021 and 2022… Remained undefeated in 2021, winning a state championship…Repeated as state champions in 2022…Ranked 44e in Extra Innings Elite 100 Class of 2023 in 2022…His sister Zoe is a sophomore for Illini softball…Hobbies include reading Spanish novels and listening to 90s R&B.

Coach Perry on Caryl: “Adisyn Caryl is a multi-sport athlete in her high school and has the ability to play multiple positions on the softball field. She will join her sister, Zoe Caryl, who is currently a second-year receiver on our team. She will also reunite with former Aces Sydney Malott and Stevie Meade. We like the size and work ethic of Adisyn. She’s the person you want at home plate when the game is on the line.”

Why Illinois? “I chose the University of Illinois because it will challenge me academically and athletically. I wanted to be in a place that would help me grow and prepare for the future. culture created by Illinois players and coaches is unparalleled and I can’t wait to be a part of this program.”

Donahue Web

Eileen Donahue // Chicago, Illinois // Marist High School // Beverly Bandits // Infield // 5-8

Remarks: Named all-conference for East Suburban Catholic Conference in 2021 and 2022…Earned First-Team All-State honors by Illinois Coaches Association…Won 2021 Illinois High School State Softball Championship …Finished second in the IHSA in 2022…Ranked 54e by Extra Innings Elite 100 Class of 2023 in 2022…Appeared on watch list for 2022 PGF Sophomores vs Juniors softball game in Huntington Beach, CA…Loves baking and decorating cakes…Favorite athlete is Jocelyn Alo.

Coach Perry on Donahue: “Eileen Donahue is a dynamic player who can put on power, but has the versatility to execute the squeeze if that’s what her team needs to achieve victory. She has one of the highest IQs in softball. high of anyone I have seen in a long time. Eileen is an energetic player with natural leadership qualities. We are delighted to welcome Eileen to our team.”

Why Illinois? “I chose Illinois because I will receive a great education while being able to play softball at an elite level. The coaches and players have created a supportive environment that I look forward to being a part of while graduating. from this prestigious university. All of my relatives who have graduated from the University of Illinois have had tremendous success in their careers.”

WebMosley

Delaney Mosley // Washington DC // St. John’s High School // Lady Lightning Gold // Utility // 5-9

Remarks: Four-year varsity letter winner…Named 2022 all-conference first team and all-state first team…Finished as 2022 state runner-up…Favorite athlete is Aliya Andrews…Names father Kevin as the person who most influenced his sports career.

Coach Perry on Mosley: “Delaney Mosley joins us from The Lady Lightning Gold, the same travel organization as all B1G Ten winners Lauren Wiles and Kiana Sherlund. One of the first things we noticed about Delaney was his overall athleticism. When you first see her, your first thought is that she has the build to excel in any sport. She has great reach in the outfield and scales it with authority at home plate.”

Why Illinois? “I chose Illinois because the second I set foot on campus, I felt a sense of belonging. The community on and off the court and the endless support from everyone world are unreal, and I can’t wait to be a part of something big.”

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Chocolate, tamales and pulque: St. Louisians honor the dead at the Day of the Dead public altar https://disturbmedia.com/chocolate-tamales-and-pulque-st-louisians-honor-the-dead-at-the-day-of-the-dead-public-altar/ Tue, 01 Nov 2022 23:43:00 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/chocolate-tamales-and-pulque-st-louisians-honor-the-dead-at-the-day-of-the-dead-public-altar/ Leticia Seitz carefully arranges chocolate bars, bright orange marigolds and photographs of late Mexican icons on an altar outside her South St. Louis boutique. “We are going to drop off chocolate for the children, fruit and their takis,” she whispers in Spanish. “Pulqued for my father, his cigars too. Seitz, 52, is one of millions […]]]>

Leticia Seitz carefully arranges chocolate bars, bright orange marigolds and photographs of late Mexican icons on an altar outside her South St. Louis boutique.

“We are going to drop off chocolate for the children, fruit and their takis,” she whispers in Spanish. “Pulqued for my father, his cigars too.

Seitz, 52, is one of millions honoring loved ones who died during El Dia de los Muertos, or Day of the Dead. The largely Mexican tradition is usually observed from October 31 to November 2 and is celebrated with intricate displays of photographs and offered — offerings to the spirits of those who have died, such as favorite drinks, sweet breads and tamales.

“It’s a celebration of their life,” she said. “It’s a celebration for us to remember them and a chance to reconnect with your roots.”

Brian Munoz

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St. Louis Public Radio

Leticia Seitz, owner of Arte Rojo STL, sets up a Day of the Dead community altar in front of her store in south St. Louis on Tuesday.

Seitz hosts his inaugural community altar outside his store, Arte Rojo STL, at 5208 Hampton Ave. Community members can add a small photo of their deceased loved ones to the altar or leave a offered.

Brilliant flowers she found hours away in rural Missouri, picado paper and the pan de muerto, everything on the altar has meaning, says Seitz.

An arch adorned with cempazúchitl flowers – or Aztec marigolds – is there to welcome the souls of deceased loved ones. Delicate paper monarch butterflies are nestled in the altar to represent immigration travels to the United States

“That’s what we would like to do to share our traditions, our cultural customs, with the community that doesn’t know about Día de los Muertos,” she said. “Maybe [some people] I’ve seen Coco, but they don’t have anything real like the altar we’re making.

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Brian Munoz

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St. Louis Public Radio

A passerby takes a photo of a community altar outside Arte Rojo STL on Tuesday during Dia de los Muertos celebrations in South St. Louis.

So far, the response at the altar has been positive, Seitz said Tuesday, noting community members’ curiosity about traditions they didn’t grow up with and his passion for teaching.

“Having [the altar] here is important to me and to the community in Mexico,” she said. “Because it’s keeping my culture, it’s keeping my traditions; it’s to keep fighting so as not to forget all that.

The public is invited to lay small ofrendas Tuesday and Wednesday at the altar outside Arte Rojo STL, 5208 Hampton Ave. The exhibition will continue until 3 p.m. on November 3.

Brian Munoz is a photojournalist and multimedia reporter at St. Louis Public Radio. You can reach him by email at bmunoz@stlpr.org and follow his work on Instagram and Twitter at @brianmmunoz.

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Seminoles tied for 3rd place at Landfall Tradition https://disturbmedia.com/seminoles-tied-for-3rd-place-at-landfall-tradition/ Sat, 29 Oct 2022 22:04:09 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/seminoles-tied-for-3rd-place-at-landfall-tradition/ WILMINGTON, NC — Junior Charlotte Heath is tied for second in the individual standings, and the Seminoles are tied for third in the team standings after two rounds of the Landfall Tradition at Landfall Country Club. Heath is part of a group of three players who are tied for second and only one stroke off […]]]>

WILMINGTON, NC — Junior Charlotte Heath is tied for second in the individual standings, and the Seminoles are tied for third in the team standings after two rounds of the Landfall Tradition at Landfall Country Club. Heath is part of a group of three players who are tied for second and only one stroke off the individual lead heading into the third and final round of the championship on Sunday.

No. 18 Florida State is tied for third in the team standings with No. 4-ranked South Carolina. The Seminoles and Gamecocks are six strokes behind second-place Wake Forest and 10 strokes behind first place in San Jose State. The Seminoles are ranked second among the six ACC teams in the event – behind the Demon Deacons, and ahead of NC State (fifth place), Duke (14e place), North Carolina (15e place) and Virginia Tech (17e square).

Heath had an even score of 72 and a total of 138 over 36 holes. She is tied for second place with NC State’s Vania Simont and South Carolina’s Justine Fourand. The three second-place golfers are chasing San Jose State’s Louisa Carlbom. With a two-round total of 137, Carlbom has a one-stroke lead in the course with 18 holes to play.

“We just didn’t give up anything for us today,” said head coach Amy Bond. “It was just one of those days – we didn’t do anything right, but we didn’t do anything wrong. There seemed to be a cover over the holes, which we think bodes well for tomorrow. We’ll see if we can’t knock more putts into the cup and make a run and take the lead.

Heath’s par-even score of 72 gave her a two-round total of 138 – just one stroke shy of her career-best 36-hole total of 137. She had scores of 66-72 in the first two rounds of the tournament. In the second round on Saturday, Heath had three birdies and 15 holes at par or better. She was never more than one stroke over par and was under par for the majority of the round.

Heath carded 10 birdies and just four bogeys in his game over the first two rounds of the event. She is tied for third among the 96 players on the court with 10 birdies.

Senior Amelia Williamson led the Seminoles with a 72-under second-round score. She has a two-round total of 145 and is tied for 31st place in the individual classification. After shooting a 75 in the first round on Friday, Williamson improved her score by five shots as she had four birdies on Saturday from just two in the first round. Williamson totaled just two bogeys in the second round compared to five in the first round.

Freshman Lottie Woad hit a par 74 from 2 over in the second round and is tied for 13e place in the individual classification with a total of 141 over two rounds.

In Sunday’s kickoff, the Seminoles will play NC State and UCF. The start of the round begins for all teams and players at 8:45 a.m.

20e Annual Landing Tradition / Oct. 28-30, 2022
Country Club of Landfall/Wilmington, NC/Par 72
T3-State of Florida, 572
T2.-Charlotte Heath, 138
T13-Lottie Pastel, 141
T31.-Amelia Williamson, 145
T50.-Jacqui Putrino, 150
T69.-Alice Hodge, 152

20e Annual Landing Tradition / Oct. 28-30, 2022
Country Club of Landfall/Wilmington, NC/Par 72
1.-State of San José, 562
2.-Wake Forest, 566
T3.-State of Florida, 572
T3.-South Carolina, 572
5.-NC State, 574
6.-UCF, 580
7.-Michigan, 581
T8.-Tennessee, 582
T8.-Purdue, 582
10.-Alabama, 583
T11.-State of Michigan, 585
T11.-Maryland, 585
13.-Furman, 588
14.-Duke, 589
15.-North Carolina, 598
16.-UNCW, 600
17.-Virginia Tech, 602
18-Penn State, 617

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Celebrating 25 Years of Latinx Culture at Northeastern https://disturbmedia.com/celebrating-25-years-of-latinx-culture-at-northeastern/ Wed, 26 Oct 2022 20:07:07 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/celebrating-25-years-of-latinx-culture-at-northeastern/ Northeastern’s Latinx Student Cultural Center celebration reminded William Rodriguez of progress made and dreams made, including his own. Rodriguez, a dual Husky graduate, came to Northeastern in 1982 as a master’s student at the College of Criminal Justice. On Tuesday evening, he gave the keynote speech marking the 25th anniversary of the cultural center he […]]]>

Northeastern’s Latinx Student Cultural Center celebration reminded William Rodriguez of progress made and dreams made, including his own.

Rodriguez, a dual Husky graduate, came to Northeastern in 1982 as a master’s student at the College of Criminal Justice. On Tuesday evening, he gave the keynote speech marking the 25th anniversary of the cultural center he helped build.

“The center means a lot to me,” Rodriguez said in an interview ahead of his speech. “Because it’s part of an evolution, of a movement, that we started even before the center was created.

One of the goals of the Latinx Student Cultural Center was to become a home for students from diverse backgrounds, Rodriguez said.

“We call it the casita, which means “the little house” in Spanish,” said Jasmine Velazco, a fourth-year journalism student in the San Francisco Bay Area. “It’s really where I feel the most comfortable.

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Ranking Latino voter outreach by Fetterman, Oz, Shapiro, Mastriano https://disturbmedia.com/ranking-latino-voter-outreach-by-fetterman-oz-shapiro-mastriano/ Mon, 24 Oct 2022 09:13:28 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/ranking-latino-voter-outreach-by-fetterman-oz-shapiro-mastriano/ Vanessa Graber is director of Free Press and organizer of Philly Boricuas, a nonpartisan grassroots group mobilizing Puerto Ricans in Philadelphia to vote on policies that would benefit the island. She warned political campaigns not to treat Latinos as a monolith. “There are people from more than 20 Latin American countries represented here in Philadelphia, […]]]>

Vanessa Graber is director of Free Press and organizer of Philly Boricuas, a nonpartisan grassroots group mobilizing Puerto Ricans in Philadelphia to vote on policies that would benefit the island. She warned political campaigns not to treat Latinos as a monolith.

“There are people from more than 20 Latin American countries represented here in Philadelphia, and each community has its own unique needs and political perspective,” Graber said, citing the Puerto Rican sovereignty debate as an example. “Even though there is a common language and culture, politically we are very, very different.”

For Graber, this lack of genuine engagement contributes to the disillusionment of voters in Northeast Philadelphia, where she is canvassing, who believe federal and state policy decisions are not helping their neighborhoods, where trash picking, crime and gentrification are in the foreground.

“At least half of the people we spoke to while we were doing outreach … said ‘We’re not going to vote because nothing changes,'” Graber said. “I think candidates and political parties need to show people progress.”

How gubernatorial candidates are reaching Latino voters

Republican Mastriano and Democrat Shapiro both used public appearances to reach Latino voters, although Shapiro started earlier and connected with the population more frequently.

In late September, Mastriano held his first public campaign event in Philadelphia. His campaign considered the event Philadelphia’s first Hispanic town hall.

Hosted by the Small Business Union, the event was mostly greeted by angry community members, Shapiro campaign surrogates and fierce protests targeting his views on abortion rights among the issues. The state senator has focused most of his attention on crime, according to The Philadelphia Inquirer. While some might see Mastriano’s visit as a viable attempt to reach Latino voters, experts say the strategy falls short of best practice — in terms of messaging and authenticity.

Neither Mastriano nor his campaign responded to a request for comment.

Shapiro’s campaign website has been available in Spanish since the day he launched his gubernatorial bid in October 2021, according to spokesman Will Simons. The state attorney general visited Allentown and Reading — which have the largest concentration of Latino residents in Pennsylvania — during his first week on the campaign trail. (Mastriano also visited Allentown, though that came later in his cross-state tour.)

Over the summer, Shapiro made appearances in Philadelphia to speak with Latino business owners and clergy.

“Our campaign has made significant investments in reaching Latino voters where they are — at their doorsteps, online, on the radio and in communities across Pennsylvania,” Simons said.

Shapiro’s campaign spent more than $500,000 on digital and radio ads targeting Latino voters, according to Simons. In addition to this, Shapiro has made several appearances on La Mega’s “El Relajo de La Mañana”, a popular Spanish-language radio show broadcast from Reading.

Shapiro recently spoke at a CASA in Action rally in York — alongside Second Lady of Pennsylvania Gisele Fetterman and a Spanish translator — about investing in public education, safe neighborhoods and small companies. He also talked about the things he thinks mean the most to him – his family and his faith.

“No matter what you look like, where you’re from, who you love or who you pray to, I want to be your governor,” Shapiro said. His words were met with cheers of “sí, se puede” and “yes, we can”.

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Spain: Will a damaging dispute have lasting consequences? https://disturbmedia.com/spain-will-a-damaging-dispute-have-lasting-consequences/ Thu, 20 Oct 2022 05:52:44 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/spain-will-a-damaging-dispute-have-lasting-consequences/ A Spanish fan holds a sign calling for coach Jorge Vilda to resign ahead of their friendly win over the United States After winning the Women’s Ballon d’Or for the second straight year on Monday, Spain midfielder Alexia Putellas was quickly brought down to earth with questions about the fallout that left her national team […]]]>
A Spanish fan holds a sign calling for coach Jorge Vilda to resign ahead of their friendly win over the United States

After winning the Women’s Ballon d’Or for the second straight year on Monday, Spain midfielder Alexia Putellas was quickly brought down to earth with questions about the fallout that left her national team in disarray.

“All I’m going to say today about the national team is that obviously it’s a subject that makes me very sad,” the Barcelona captain said.

“I think we have to talk about it, but today is not the day. It’s a day of celebration, a historic day, and that’s it.”

Last month, the Spanish Football Federation (RFEF) claimed that 15 members of its national team had said they would quit unless head coach Jorge Vilda quits.

This was later denied by the players, who were told they would not be selected for international duty unless they apologized.

Putellas, 28, currently absent with a serious knee injuryhas previously expressed his support for those involved – including Spain captain Irene Paredes, top scorer Jenni Hermoso and midfielder Aitana Bonmati, who came fifth in this year’s Ballon d’Or.

With just nine months until the 2023 Women’s World Cup, BBC Sport takes a closer look at the explosive row which could have detrimental consequences for women’s football in Spain.

What are the main issues?

It is understood the players first raised concerns over training methods, inadequate game preparation and training decisions at Euro 2022, where the squad reached the last eight before lose to eventual winners England.

Spanish journalist Maria Tikas, who writes for national daily Sport, told BBC Sport players that “the results of recent years do not reflect the level of the team”.

Since Vilda’s appointment in 2015, Spain have failed to get past the quarter-finals of a major tournament. They have won around 70% of their matches under Vilda.

At the same time, the Barcelona team, consisting mainly of Spanish players, shone in club football, successively reaching the Champions League finals.

Tikas said there was a general feeling in Spain among fans and journalists that “the federation’s commitment to women’s football is not real and not enough”.

“Players notice a lot of differences between training sessions with their clubs and the national team, as well as many practices that are ‘inappropriate’,” Tikas added.

“They didn’t like that the federation renewed Vilda’s contract until 2024 a few days before the Euros. The message sent was that whatever the outcome of the Euros, Vilda would continue to lead.”

Tikas believes there have been examples of players joining the national team and starting games after recovering from injury – despite medical advice – and a lack of rotation affecting player wellbeing.

Will the situation improve before the World Cup?

Jennifer Hermoso, Alexia Putellas and Aitana Bonmati
Jennifer Hermoso (left), Aitana Bonmati (centre) and Alexia Putellas (right) are among the top Barcelona players affected

Following statements from the RFEF and the players, Vilda told reporters: “I’m deeply hurt. It’s an unfair situation that nobody deserves. I think it’s ridiculous on a global scale.

“This mess is hurting Spanish football. It’s a global embarrassment.”

Hermoso later described the situation as the “The worst moments in the history of women’s football in Spain”.

Vilda was forced to name a depleted squad for matches against Olympic finalists Sweden and world number one United States in October, ruling out 14 members of his previous selection. However, Spain still managed a 1-1 draw and a 2-0 win respectively.

Tikas said these results “advantage” Vilda and the new players.

Nine of the squad members selected for these friendlies came from Real Madrid, and it has been suggested that there is a split between Barcelona and Real players, but Tikas doesn’t believe it.

“There are Real Madrid players who agree with them. However, their club told them not to be part of the group that sent the email and to go with the national team. they were called,” she added.

“I don’t think it’s a separation between Barcelona and Real Madrid players, but it looks like it.”

It is clear that a division has arisen, however, between some of the players and coaching staff and the federation.

“The team that [played in] the last international window is good, but Vilda only trusts them because they are with him,” Tikas said.

“Some of the players involved [Alexia Putellas, Jenni Hermoso and Irene Paredes] are among the best players in their position. Of course, not having them at the World Cup will hurt Spain’s chances.”

Tikas said the situation was “unsustainable” and would likely come down to RFEF president Luis Rubiales’ choice to support Vilda or the players.

“Rubiales will always choose Vilda before anyone else,” Tikas said.

What is the level of support for Vilda?

Jorge Vilda
Jorge Vilda oversaw a draw against Sweden and a win against the United States in October

There was a positive reaction to Vilda’s appointment in 2015 after 30 years under Ignacio Quereda, leading to players publicly airing grievances against a alleged culture of fear and intimidationexternal link.

Vilda has had success with Spain’s youth teams, including two gold medals in the U17 Women’s Euro, leading to a nomination for Fifa’s Coach of the Year in 2014.

However, Vilda had not managed a senior team before his appointment, and as women’s football grew in Spain, Tikas said many began to question whether he was “good enough to be in charge”.

“The federation has so much confidence in him because he is very close to President Rubiales, and he is also the sporting director of the RFEF women’s national team system,” Tikas added.

Reaction to the current situation has been mixed in Spain, Tikas said, with many who have followed the team for years not surprised by the latest developments.

“I’m disappointed because this situation happened when Spanish women’s football was at its best and it’s definitely a step backwards,” she added.

“I see what England are doing and I feel envy.

“I think a lot of changes need to be made and the players should always be listened to and their opinion taken into account.

“The players concerned should have talked more and explained their reasons. They don’t want to talk and I think that’s a mistake. Many media are just reporting on one of the parties.”

BBC Sport has contacted the RFEF for a response.

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