Spanish tradition – Disturb Media http://disturbmedia.com/ Wed, 13 Oct 2021 09:44:51 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://disturbmedia.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-6-120x120.png Spanish tradition – Disturb Media http://disturbmedia.com/ 32 32 KVS ATHLETE OF THE WEEK A runner leads the way and sometimes it takes a team https://disturbmedia.com/kvs-athlete-of-the-week-a-runner-leads-the-way-and-sometimes-it-takes-a-team/ https://disturbmedia.com/kvs-athlete-of-the-week-a-runner-leads-the-way-and-sometimes-it-takes-a-team/#respond Wed, 13 Oct 2021 05:14:30 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/kvs-athlete-of-the-week-a-runner-leads-the-way-and-sometimes-it-takes-a-team/ LAYOUT NOTE: YES, THE PIC DASHBOARD represents the KVHS football team as ATHLETE OF THE WEEK The Sun of the Kern Valley The athletic department’s fifth ATHLETE OF THE WEEK nominations continue this growing tradition of recognizing talented student-athletes. To recap the nomination process, we encourage every coach at Kern Valley High School to send […]]]>

LAYOUT NOTE: YES, THE PIC DASHBOARD represents the KVHS football team as ATHLETE OF THE WEEK

The Sun of the Kern Valley The athletic department’s fifth ATHLETE OF THE WEEK nominations continue this growing tradition of recognizing talented student-athletes. To recap the nomination process, we encourage every coach at Kern Valley High School to send us nominations, but if they don’t, we’ll find ours.

Based on the best performance of the student-athletes, we are asking coaches, DAs and community members to nominate a boy and girl from their athletic programs to compete against school nominations, and we will post a photo of them and their weekly statistics or other information provided. We believe this program will help local student-athletes secure scholarships while gaining additional recognition from school programs. Please send us your applications, why they deserve it and a photo of them. Let us give these student-athletes the recognition they deserve. If we do not receive nominations in both the boys and girls categories, we will select a winner based on the pool of nominations. Help us give them the recognition they deserve.

This week we have something different as we recognize a whole group of athletes as well as some unique runners.

KVS WOMEN’S ATHLETE OF THE WEEK

Cross country coach Erin Woodward has named a runner. She said, “Cassandra Guerneros has done EVERY practice and meet this season. She makes a maximum of efforts and is our third finish in the races. Cassandra is in first year and takes the most difficult classes. She is a member of the California Scholarship Federation and the Spanish Club. Cassandra can’t wait to play soccer this winter.

In two volleyball games this week the Lady Broncs parted ways, senior Nikki brooks remained undefeated for the season with a 6-2 6-3 victory in the team’s loss to Boron and a 6-1 6-0 victory in the team’s victory over Rosamond. Brooks is 8-0 in singles this season and 5-3 in doubles. Brooks is our first two-time nominee.

KVS MALE ATHLETE OF THE WEEK

Coach Woodward has also named a male runner to the team. The cross country coach said: “We haven’t had a meet this week, but I still wanted to name the second Kern Valley cross country student, Ed Bunting.Woodward said, “Ed is a freshman on the cross country team. What makes Ed so valuable to the team is that he’s been in every practice and every game since the start of the season. Ed is a sophomore and will play basketball and is a member of the Spanish club. Outside of school, he spends time playing video games, working on cars, and building things. According to his family, he is very creative.

Our second nominee is … the ensemble Kern Valley Broncs Football Team. It’s hard to tell an athlete when the whole team behaves as well as the Broncs in their 43-0 home win over Cal City. Head football coach Ben Goffinet said: “Our offense marked all of our possessions tonight. They played with a real fire tonight. The offense divided six touchdowns among five players. In defense, a swarming Bronc unit stopped the Ravens, holding them within two yards of the melee. The names of the players who have played with the ATHLETE OF THE WEEK skills range from rookies to substitutes and leaving any of them out this week would be a glaring oversight.

Congratulation to Cassandra Guerneros and the whole Kern Valley High School Football Team by being named Sun of the Kern Valley ATHLETES of the WEEK.

Coaches and community members send us your picks for KVS ATHLETE OF THE WEEK, a recap of their competitive prowess and a photo of them and give them the community recognition they deserve. Send your selections to: mike@kvsun.com.


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full flexibility comes to the office https://disturbmedia.com/full-flexibility-comes-to-the-office/ https://disturbmedia.com/full-flexibility-comes-to-the-office/#respond Wed, 13 Oct 2021 00:47:41 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/full-flexibility-comes-to-the-office/ “One of the strengths of liquid work is that it gives more confidence to the teams, who gain autonomy to organize their work and their commitments according to the time and resources available”, we specify. Imma Catala, Global Head of Strategy and Solutions Development for the Talent and Culture department of BBVA. In addition to […]]]>

“One of the strengths of liquid work is that it gives more confidence to the teams, who gain autonomy to organize their work and their commitments according to the time and resources available”, we specify. Imma Catala, Global Head of Strategy and Solutions Development for the Talent and Culture department of BBVA.

In addition to this self-management, there is the task of correctly identifying one’s own capacities and how to improve them. Therefore, the secret to success at work is “to work on your employability and to keep your professional profile attractive over time,” adds the director of career services at the University of Navarre.

Continuous learning and adaptation to new technologies is a need that has already been stressed by international bodies like the World Economic Forum, which advocates the point of view that the fourth industrial revolution will involve more than a billion people in retraining by 2030, and the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), which estimates that one-third of the world’s jobs will undergo “significant changes” due to technology over the next decade.

The challenge for companies: talent management

This model also represents an operational and mental change on the part of companies. As Catalá says, “greater flexibility or liquidity at work requires a degree of organization, work methodologies and leadership styles that are very different from traditional styles”, adapted to a more decentralized reality and based on trust in people. teams.

“Greater flexibility requires very different working methodologies and styles of leadership from traditional”

Companies are called upon to create training models that are “attractive to employees, flexible and digital”. According to the BBVA expert, these should aim at retraining, a concept that was explored in a recent BBVA Open Talks Spain event by BBVA Open Innovation, ‘When retraining is an adventure’, and skills development or updating and improving existing capacities. They should also cover soft skills that are gaining popularity today, such as empathy, resilience and learn agility.

For the deputy director of máshumano, Tomás Pereda Riaza, the major challenge for companies is to achieve a good “management of the talent ecosystem” to ensure that the levels of quality are the same for those who work at the same time. inside and outside the organization. While it would be ideal to speak of “talent experience” rather than “employee experience”, Pereda Riaza laments that “current regulations do not help talent on both sides to be managed at the same level”.

“Flexible working is not about coming home with a computer and working from there”

Indeed, the new ways of working that have emerged, especially those driven by digitization, risk entering a gray area in the legislative arena, but there are examples of the European Union and other countries are trying to regulate these models. “Flexible working is not about coming home with a computer and working from there. Here we are raising the many questions we have during the pandemic – what happens to my obligations, to my rights, my responsibilities… it is constantly evolving, ”notes Cabezas.

Despite these potential obstacles, the demand for talent for greater flexibility continues to increase, as companies strive to establish new work dynamics that meet the needs of the post-pandemic world. Over the next few years, we’ll see that liquid labor is the answer.

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Art and culture converge in El Monte – University Times https://disturbmedia.com/art-and-culture-converge-in-el-monte-university-times/ https://disturbmedia.com/art-and-culture-converge-in-el-monte-university-times/#respond Wed, 13 Oct 2021 00:15:56 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/art-and-culture-converge-in-el-monte-university-times/ Memories of the community space of El Monte launched in the midst of a pandemic. Four dancers wear headdresses adorned with the heads of ferocious animals. They ask ancestors for permission to perform honored traditions, drawing the attention of a hushed crowd. As the performers engage in the Danza Mexica, or Aztec dance, the beat […]]]>

Memories of the community space of El Monte launched in the midst of a pandemic.

Four dancers wear headdresses adorned with the heads of ferocious animals. They ask ancestors for permission to perform honored traditions, drawing the attention of a hushed crowd.

As the performers engage in the Danza Mexica, or Aztec dance, the beat of the accompanying drums makes the ground beat to its rhythm.

Rich aromas of tamales, pozole and flautas emanate from the vendors nearby, who claim the whole sidewalk.

These are some scenes from the inauguration of the community art space, Memories of El Monte, a Sunday at the end of September. Community members came together to connect and honor Indigenous and Latinx culture.

“All of a sudden this well of magnetic, powerful and melancholy energy overwhelmed me when I arrived here and it put me in a very good mood,” said a speaker, Iyapo Ngina, who is a reverend. , acupuncturist, activist and spiritualist. to advise. “I’m grateful to be in this space with my Indigenous siblings and I think it’s really important. We need to spend more time getting out of our comfort zones with each other. I think in this time when we have the capacity to radically change the circumstances of humanity, we have to leave our spaces, we have to show ourselves for others in a more visceral and organic way. It’s not uncommon for me to be the only black person when I show up in spaces. I used to get kind of a feeling about it, but Spirit tells me it’s an opportunity for me to build bridges and show myself off for others.

The event aimed to build community and raise awareness among residents of El Monte and neighboring local communities, according to Carla Macal, an organizer of Memories of El Monte and a member of Sin Fronteras 1312. All of the small businesses, vendors, performers, and performers were from El Monte or the San Gabriel Valley.

“As an artist, it’s nice to have spaces where I feel safe to talk about my art because I do political art and I talk about social issues” Dulce Lopez, said a local artist. “It’s always nice to have a space where I can sell things but also interact with like-minded people who match my mission. Art is connecting with others.

Lopez found out about the event through another local artist group, Fronteras Sin 1312, which offers solidarity items for sale at Memories of El Monte.

Memories of El Monte, located on Garvey Street in El Monte, Calif., opened in July 2021. It prioritizes centering queer, trans, black and indigenous people of color in activities, events, workshops, classes and speakers, according to Macal. The community space provides resources and emphasizes the indigenous lands and Tongva lands on which the building sits, the primary custodians of the land being the Houtngna. This space is only collaborative with entities such as the Union of tenants of El Monte and Sin Fronteras 1312 have come together to provide a community refrigerator, theory book clubs, a zine library and more.

Souvenirs from El Monte crowdsourced to get finance for rent, according to his GoFundMe page. While the group had a smooth opening in July, COVID prevented further opening until the recent event.

“As we do not operate like a regular business, [COVID] didn’t hit us that hard, ”Macal said. “We aim to build relationships and trust in the community. COVID-19 slowed us down but helped us meet people from the neighborhood. We run hybrid meetings and events for people who cannot meet in person.

For many vendors, having a community that prioritizes them is essential.

“For small businesses, it’s hard to get the word out,” Lopez said. “Especially for young POC immigrants, it’s hard to have people who are willing to offer you this space in an affordable and accessible way. This kind of space can have so many different artists working together, as I was able to sign up and also bring my mom and get her sold. his art also.”

Another seller, Leslie Campos, came from La Verne to show her support, sell her handmade jewelry and make friends.

“Community spaces are so important because when I was younger I didn’t feel any sense of community because I didn’t know my own identity,” Campos said. “I was too Latino for white kids but too white for Latino kids. My Spanish is screwed up, but after coming to spaces like these, it helped me realize that I’m not the only one having this experience. It’s stuff like that that connects people to their roots. Especially here in El Monte, we experience similar things.

At one point late in the event, around 150 people were crammed into the parking lot and onto the street where vendors were set up.

“We are so excited for the future of community space. A lot of people are excited and continue to share how we need these spaces, ”said Macal, an organizer. “I think it was a great participation and everyone had a smile on their face.”



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Irish piper who led the Chieftains, Paddy Moloney dies at 83 https://disturbmedia.com/irish-piper-who-led-the-chieftains-paddy-moloney-dies-at-83/ https://disturbmedia.com/irish-piper-who-led-the-chieftains-paddy-moloney-dies-at-83/#respond Tue, 12 Oct 2021 23:43:38 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/irish-piper-who-led-the-chieftains-paddy-moloney-dies-at-83/ Paddy Moloney, the playful but disciplined singer and bagpiper of the Chieftains, a group that was at the forefront of the global revival of traditional Irish music performed with traditional instruments, died in Dublin on Monday. He was 83 years old. His daughter Aedin Moloney confirmed the death, in a hospital, but did not specify […]]]>

Paddy Moloney, the playful but disciplined singer and bagpiper of the Chieftains, a group that was at the forefront of the global revival of traditional Irish music performed with traditional instruments, died in Dublin on Monday. He was 83 years old.

His daughter Aedin Moloney confirmed the death, in a hospital, but did not specify the cause.

For nearly 60 years, the Chieftains have toured extensively, released over two dozen albums, and won six Grammy Awards. They were particularly known for their collaborations with artists like Van Morrison, Mick Jagger, Paul McCartney, Nanci Griffith and Luciano PavarottI.

“Over the Sea to Skye,” the Chieftains’ collaboration with flutist James Galway, peaked at No. 20 on the Billboard Classic Albums chart in 1996.

“Our music is centuries old, but it’s really a living thing,” Mr. Moloney told the Philadelphia Inquirer in 1989. “We don’t use flashing lights, smoke bombs, or acrobats falling from the scene.” He added: “We try to communicate a feeling of celebration, and it’s something that everyone understands.”

In 2012, while vice-president, President Biden told People magazine that his desire was to sing “Shenandoah” with the Chieftains “if I had musical talent.” He invited them to perform at his inauguration this year, but Covid restrictions have kept them from traveling.

Mr. Moloney was a master of many instruments: he played the uileann pipes (Ireland’s national bagpipes), tin whistle, bodhran (a type of drum) and button accordion. He was also the group’s main composer and arranger.

Asked in 2010 about the NPR quiz show “Wait, wait … Don’t tell me” what he thought was the sexiest instrument, he chose the pipes.

“I often call it the octopus,” he said, “and so, I mean, it’s something that moves every part of you.”

The Chieftains performed at the Great Wall of China, Nashville and Berlin to celebrate the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1990, joining Pink Floyd’s Roger Waters to play “The Wall”.

Their best-known recordings included “Cotton Eyed Joe”, “Marche d’O’Sullivan”, “Bonaparte’s Retreat” and “Long black veil ” (with M. Jagger). Their 1992 album “Another Country”, a collaboration with country artists like Emmylou Harris, Willie Nelson and Chet Atkins, won the Grammy for Best Contemporary Folk Album.

Their other Grammys included one for Best Pop Collaboration with vocals for “Have I Told You Lately That I Love You?” “, A collaboration with Mr. Morrison on their album” The Long Black Veil “, released in 1995, and one for the best world album, for” Santiago “(1996), composed of Spanish and Latin American music.

Mr. Moloney had an affinity for country music.

“I always thought of Nashville as another part of Ireland, to the south or something like that,” he said. said on the Tennessee Performing Arts Center website in 2020. “When I came there and played with music geniuses like Sam Bush or Jerry Douglas or Earl Scruggs, they got it all so easily. You don’t have to bend down and rush.

The last track on “Another Country” – “Final: Did You Ever Go A-Courtin ‘, Uncle Joe / Will the Circle Be Unbroken ”- with Ms. Harris, Ricky Skaggs and the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band. Rambles, a cultural art magazine, described it as “the closest to a recorded Irish hooley”, a reference to an Irish party with music. The track, according to the magazine, sounded like “a few pints were drunk and the boxed bread was handed out before the gathered music greats decided to have a free musical for all.”

Patrick Moloney was born on August 1, 1938 in Donnycarney, north Dublin. His father, John, worked in the accounting department of the Irish Glass Bottle Company. His mother, Catherine (Conroy) Moloney, was a housewife.

Paddy came from a musical family: one of his grandfathers played the flute and his uncle Stephen played in the Ballyfin Pipe Band. Paddy started playing a plastic whistle at age 6 and began studying uileann pipes soon after, under the tutelage of a man known as the “King of the Pipes.”

He took up the bagpipe easily, gave his first public concert at the age of 9 and performed in the local streets.

“There were five bagpipers in the Donnycarney area,” he told Ireland’s Own magazine in 2019. “I was going around the cul-de-sac playing like the flute player, and my friends were following me behind me.”

After leaving school in the 1950s, he started working at Baxendale & Company, a building materials company, where he met his future wife, Rita O’Reilly. He joined the traditional Irish group Ceoltóirí Chualann in 1960 and formed the Chieftains in 1962; the name comes from the news “Death of a leader” by Irish writer John Montague.

In the 1960s and 1970s, Mr. Moloney was an executive with Claddagh Records, of which he was a founder, and produced or supervised 45 albums in folk, traditional, classical, poetry and spoken word.

The Chieftains – who hit hard in the mid-1970s with sold-out concerts at London’s Royal Albert Hall – were initially strictly an ensemble of instrumentalists. But in the 1980s, the band moved away from their original purism and Mr. Moloney emerged as a songwriter, writing new music steeped in Irish lore.

The Chieftains began to mix Irish music with styles from the Celtic diaspora in Spain and Canada as well as bluegrass and country from the United States. They have collaborated with well-known rock and pop musicians and with an international assortment of musicians as far away as Norway, Bulgaria and China.

Alone, Mr. Moloney embarked on writing and arranging music for films including “Barry Lyndon” (1975), “Babe: Pig in the City” (1998) and “Gangs of New York” (2002).

Besides his wife and daughter, he is survived by two sons, Aonghus and Padraig; four grandchildren; and a sister, Sheila.

In 2012, on the 50th anniversary of their founding, the Chieftains teamed up with 12 folk, country, bluegrass, rockabilly and indie rock artists – including Bon Iver, the Decembrists, the Low Anthem and Imelda May – to record the album “Voice of Age.” They also embarked on a tour that ended at Carnegie Hall to The Saint Patrick.

“What’s going on here with these young bands,” Mr. Moloney told the New York Times at the time, explaining the concept of the album, “are they coming back to the melody, to the real stuff, to everyone’s roots and folk feeling I can hear any of them singing folk songs.


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Pasadena Public Library to host presentation on city’s Hispanic-influenced architecture – Pasadena Now https://disturbmedia.com/pasadena-public-library-to-host-presentation-on-citys-hispanic-influenced-architecture-pasadena-now/ https://disturbmedia.com/pasadena-public-library-to-host-presentation-on-citys-hispanic-influenced-architecture-pasadena-now/#respond Tue, 12 Oct 2021 23:40:00 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/pasadena-public-library-to-host-presentation-on-citys-hispanic-influenced-architecture-pasadena-now/ The Pasadena Public Library invites the community to participate in an online presentation Wednesday exploring the history of Hispanic-influenced architecture in Pasadena and around the world. The seminar will begin at 4 p.m. via Zoom and will be presented by Dave Nufer who serves as a program developer and docent for Pasadena Heritage and the […]]]>

The Pasadena Public Library invites the community to participate in an online presentation Wednesday exploring the history of Hispanic-influenced architecture in Pasadena and around the world.

The seminar will begin at 4 p.m. via Zoom and will be presented by Dave Nufer who serves as a program developer and docent for Pasadena Heritage and the Los Angeles Conservancy, organizers said.

“This presentation focuses on how the Spanish / Hispanic / Latin architectural design vocabulary has evolved over a thousand years and across four continents, and how it has been used here in Pasadena,” said the library in a written statement.

“He examines many local examples including the San Gabriel Mission, Castle Green, Caltech Campus, Civic Center, 1920s Spanish Colonial Revival style homes built by George Washington Smith, Wallace Neff and many more. , as well as more recent projects with a Hispanic influence. like the Del Mar station, ”the statement said.

The architectural style of the Spanish colonial renaissance dates back around 1,000 years, Nufer said.

“So there you had a fusion of Islamic, North African, Roman and Spanish architectures and a lot of what we think of as design vocabulary has now appeared there for the first time,” he said. -he declares. “… The kind of exterior plain stucco walls, the red tiled roofs, a concentration inside the house on courtyards and gardens, the use of arches or arches, the use of tiles of colored ceramics and a concentration inside the house on aquatic elements such as fountains or ponds.

“So it developed initially in Spain. Then you had Italian Renaissance influences, then the development of a more elaborate emotion – it’s called Baroque architecture, which developed in Italy and moved to Spain and then to the New World and really flourished in Mexico, ”according to Nufer. “And then these three traditions arose beyond the American border when the California missions were founded.”

Built in 1771, the San Gabriel mission is one of the earliest examples.

“The missions were a very simplified version of these more elaborate forms from Mexico and Spain because they had very limited resources at the border,” Nufer said. “The San Gabriel Mission which was founded or built in 1771 is a very simplified style of mission with two corner towers, a stuccoed adobe brick exterior and a red tiled roof with an interior courtyard surrounded by an arcade. . “

Although Pasadena is best known for its Craftsman-style architecture, like the famous Gamble House, “… there’s probably more Hispanic style and influenced architecture here than any other style,” Nufer said. “You will see it in residences, in multi-unit buildings, in our town hall, in the library, in many churches, in schools. It is a style of glue that goes very well with other architectural styles. And we have a lot of different architectural styles in Pasadena, so that helps keep them together to create a cohesive cityscape.

Pasadena’s old mill dates back to the early 1800s, he said.

“Castle Green, which is one of the most important and outstanding examples of Hispanic style architecture, was built in the 1890s. Pasadena City Hall and Central Library were built in the late 1920s. Caltech’s original campus from around 1916 to the early 1930s was built almost entirely in the Spanish Colonial Revival style. The Pasadena Playhouse dates from around 1927, ”said Nufer.

To reserve a seat and receive a link to the Zoom meeting, visit pasadena.evanced.info/signup/EventDetails?eventid=4911.

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Woman creates a twist on the family’s traditional coquito in honor of her late grandmother https://disturbmedia.com/woman-creates-a-twist-on-the-familys-traditional-coquito-in-honor-of-her-late-grandmother/ https://disturbmedia.com/woman-creates-a-twist-on-the-familys-traditional-coquito-in-honor-of-her-late-grandmother/#respond Tue, 12 Oct 2021 23:01:32 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/woman-creates-a-twist-on-the-familys-traditional-coquito-in-honor-of-her-late-grandmother/ LOWER EAST SIDE, Manhattan – After Cynthia Sepulveda’s grandmother died from cancer and diabetes, family reunions were different. “Being Puerto Rican is all about celebration and she played a big part in the celebration that surrounded her,” Sepulveda said. Her grandmother’s coquito – a coconut rum drink from Puerto Rico – was something they all […]]]>

LOWER EAST SIDE, Manhattan – After Cynthia Sepulveda’s grandmother died from cancer and diabetes, family reunions were different.

“Being Puerto Rican is all about celebration and she played a big part in the celebration that surrounded her,” Sepulveda said.

Her grandmother’s coquito – a coconut rum drink from Puerto Rico – was something they all looked forward to, but traditions fell apart for two years as the family mourned his death.

It was then that Sepulveda realized it was time to bring back those old traditions and start celebrating life again. So she created her own version of the dairy-free drink by creating her own product – Flaco Coquito.

“I cut down on sugar and cut out the milk so it was less fat and practically brought it back to how my great-great-grandmother did,” said Sepulveda.

Made with natural ingredients including coconut milk, vanilla and cinnamon, she developed it for her mother, who was also diagnosed with diabetes and cancer, to benefit as well.

“As soon as she tried it, she just loved it and she didn’t miss the other heavier and sweeter coquito,” Sepulveda said.

Her mother is also deceased, but to keep her family legacy alive, she was in the perfect place on Tuesday to honor him: Ativism – an exhibit on the Lower East Side featuring artists and vendors from Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic. and Honduras, to name a few, celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month.

Sepulveda says this brand is more than just a bottle of coquito for her. Everything about the bottle – from the red drop on the cap to the logo – is a vision she says came to her from her late grandmother.

He represents his family and his ancestors and she adds that all his culture is in this bottle.


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Hispanic Heritage Profile: Olga Romero https://disturbmedia.com/hispanic-heritage-profile-olga-romero/ https://disturbmedia.com/hispanic-heritage-profile-olga-romero/#respond Tue, 12 Oct 2021 22:04:36 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/hispanic-heritage-profile-olga-romero/ Principal Olga Romero is the founding principal of Dallas Hybrid Preparatory at Stephen J. Hay, the first hybrid elementary school in the state of Texas. This new school aims to transform traditional learning, combining in-person and virtual education to create a learning environment that fosters meaningful connections with the local and global community. To achieve […]]]>

Principal Olga Romero is the founding principal of Dallas Hybrid Preparatory at Stephen J. Hay, the first hybrid elementary school in the state of Texas. This new school aims to transform traditional learning, combining in-person and virtual education to create a learning environment that fosters meaningful connections with the local and global community.

To achieve this, Dr Romero brings not only her vast experience – she has been at Dallas ISD for almost 10 years and is in her third year as a Director – but also her background and legacy as a proud Latina and a Doctor. in education.

“By connecting with our communities, I can build communication bridges, be more inclusive with our leadership and [build]support practices. Our communities feel heard and included when you can meet their needs, ”she said. “When students see that you look like them, talk like them and understand their cultural background, they feel like they belong and it strengthens their commitment to their educational future. “

Dr. Romero was born in Mayagüez, Puerto Rico, a country known for its beautiful people, delicious food, exceptional music, but most of all, strong family ties. “We are proud of our heritage and flaunt it whenever we can. Our abuelas [grandmothers]taught us the importance of family, or family, and our values ​​are first and foremost rooted in the community, ”said the director.

In 2008, she moved from Puerto Rico to Dallas, where being bilingual and bicultural has helped her connect with the Hispanic community and other cultures in the metroplex.

“The Spanish language is much more than speaking the same language. It’s about connecting with others about what makes us unique, diverse and yet so similar, ”said Dr Romero. “We share the joy of knowing that being bilingual and bicultural is indeed a privilege.

Dr Romero added that one of the most important characteristics of being Hispanic in America today is that “it doesn’t matter where you come from – El Salvador, Mexico or Puerto Rico – our culture celebrates all of us. like family. We are proud of our heritage; we serve our community con orgullo [with pride]and know that our contributions to this great nation are important.


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Food and Family: How the Two Keep Hispanics, Latinos Together, and Traditions Shared with Northeast Ohio https://disturbmedia.com/food-and-family-how-the-two-keep-hispanics-latinos-together-and-traditions-shared-with-northeast-ohio/ https://disturbmedia.com/food-and-family-how-the-two-keep-hispanics-latinos-together-and-traditions-shared-with-northeast-ohio/#respond Tue, 12 Oct 2021 21:11:00 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/food-and-family-how-the-two-keep-hispanics-latinos-together-and-traditions-shared-with-northeast-ohio/ The recipes that are now creating heirlooms in Northeast Ohio all started humbly in family kitchens or through a street taco. CLEVELAND – In Hispanic and Latin culture, food is the common thread that unites family and friends. Despite being a minority in Cleveland, Latinos have a rich history of sharing food and culture in […]]]>

The recipes that are now creating heirlooms in Northeast Ohio all started humbly in family kitchens or through a street taco.

CLEVELAND – In Hispanic and Latin culture, food is the common thread that unites family and friends.

Despite being a minority in Cleveland, Latinos have a rich history of sharing food and culture in Northeast Ohio, and what creates memories and legacies began in their homes.

“[I really like] keep it simple. Coriander and onion, bringing all the flavors, ”said Cilantro Taqueria co-owner Reynaldo Galindo.

Tacos, for some, are a tasty and delicate meal, more certain.

“[Here,] have music, ”Galindo said. “I feel like you don’t really experience taquerias here.”

In every bite of the tacos served at Cilantro Taqueria are generations of tradition and family, ingredients for which there are no substitutes.

“I remember she walked into Luchita’s and saw her in the kitchen,” Galindo said.

Galindo is the grandson of Maria de la Luz Munoz, known in Cleveland as Luchita Galindo.

“My mother grew up in Mexico,” said Mari Galindo, one of Luchita’s daughters. “She was very humble, very shy, and weighed around 98 pounds.”

Originally running a leather shoe company in Mexico while raising eleven children, cooking wasn’t a profession for Luchita at the time, but it came naturally.

“We joked that she was like the godfather because she would be surrounded by all these people with her delicious food,” said Mari.

Once settled in Cleveland, word of her talent spread.

“People always told him, ‘you have to open a restaurant,’” said Mari. “That’s how Luchita started. We ended up having 11 Luchita. It was her baby after raising her 11 babies.

After 25 years of sharing recipes and building a community, Luchita has retired. Only one “Luchita’s Restaurant” remains, the original on West 117 St., in the western part of Cleveland.

Luchita’s influence remains in the new generations, including Cilantro Taqueria.

“Have you always wanted to open a restaurant,” asked 3News reporter Marisa Saenz.

“No, I really wanted to go to school. I have always liked cars, ”replied Galindo.

From the automotive industry, Galindo would pivot towards what he knew growing up: catering.

A path also familiar to Mark Puente.

“I spent 15 years as a truck driver in Cleveland. I was hired at The Plain Dealer in 2005,” Puente said.

Puente’s career as a journalist would be fulfilling, taking him across the country, covering the tough news.

“Now we’re here to make tacos,” Puente said.

“Avocado salsa, salsa verde, red salsa, cilantro, onions, lime, radish. That’s all typical [Los Angeles] street taco that I fell in love with when I was working at a newspaper, ”Puente described.

Back in Cleveland, Puente is now building his small business: Puente’s Tijuana Tacos.

“It’s a family affair, from start to finish: close friends, friends of our children,” Puente said.

Relatives are involved in the process every step of the way, a simple reflection of how Puente lived her life and now shares her food with Northeast Ohio.

“We couldn’t have done that or got the licenses or do the events without a family,” Puente said.

MORE FROM JOURNALIST MARISA SAENZ:

RELATED: $ 18 Million ‘Transformative’ Grant for UH, Case Western Reserve to Address Health Disparities Among African American Communities

RELATED: Businesses Struggle to Find Workers in Northeast Ohio

RELATED: ‘Anyone Know’: Who Killed Raymond Timbrook?

Editor’s Note: The video in the player above is from a previously published and unrelated story.


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Fans worry about ranchera icon Vicente Fernández, who remains in hospital: NPR https://disturbmedia.com/fans-worry-about-ranchera-icon-vicente-fernandez-who-remains-in-hospital-npr/ https://disturbmedia.com/fans-worry-about-ranchera-icon-vicente-fernandez-who-remains-in-hospital-npr/#respond Tue, 12 Oct 2021 20:33:00 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/fans-worry-about-ranchera-icon-vicente-fernandez-who-remains-in-hospital-npr/ SARAH MCCAMMON, HOST: He is known as El Rey, the king of Mexican music, the country’s greatest living singer. For over half a century, Vicente Fernandez has provided the soundtrack of Mexican life to almost every corner of the Spanish-speaking world. The king of music ranchera, 81, has been hospitalized for more than two months. […]]]>


SARAH MCCAMMON, HOST:

He is known as El Rey, the king of Mexican music, the country’s greatest living singer. For over half a century, Vicente Fernandez has provided the soundtrack of Mexican life to almost every corner of the Spanish-speaking world. The king of music ranchera, 81, has been hospitalized for more than two months. And as NPR’s Carrie Kahn reports, fans are worried about his fate and the future of the music he has defined.

(EXTRACT FROM THE SONG BY VICENT FERNANDEZ, “EL REY”)

CARRIE KAHN, BYLINE: The lyrics to one of ranchera’s most famous ballads take on a more urgent tone these days, given Vicente Fernandez’s current health.

(EXTRACT FROM THE SONG, “EL REY”)

VICENTE FERNANDEZ: (Song in Spanish).

KAHN: “The day I die,” he sings, “you will cry and cry and cry. “

(EXTRACT FROM THE SONG, “EL REY”)

FERNANDEZ: (Song in Spanish).

KAHN: In 1974, when Fernandez popularized the song “El Rey”, he was singing despised love. But since he fell this summer at his ranch outside Guadalajara and the almost daily rumors of his disappearance, his fans and fellow musicians have been crying.

RIGOBERTO ALFARO RODRIGUEZ: (Speaking Spanish).

KAHN: “There are a lot of things that make Fernandez great, but nothing quite like his voice, that booming voice,” says Rigoberto Alfaro Rodriguez, 86, who has arranged dozens of Fernandez songs for decades.

(EXTRACT FROM THE ARCHIVED RECORD)

FERNANDEZ: (Song in Spanish).

KAHN: Still dressed in a crisp mariachi or charro suit with a huge wide-brimmed sombrero and a pistol on his hip, Fernandez loved to show off that voice.

(EXTRACT FROM THE ARCHIVED RECORD)

FERNANDEZ: (Song in Spanish).

KAHN: In concert, he lowered his microphone and sang the end of an unamplified song to thunderous applause.

(EXTRACT FROM THE ARCHIVED RECORD)

FERNANDEZ: (Song in Spanish).

(APPLAUSE)

KAHN: Fernandez has sold over 50 million albums worldwide, appeared in dozens of films, won three Grammys, eight Latin Grammys, and has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

ARTURO VARGAS: (Speaking Spanish).

KAHN: “He left us a great musical legacy,” says Arturo Vargas, longtime guitarist of the famous band Mariachi Vargas from Tecalitlan, a hard-earned legacy. It took Fernandez years to break into the big league. He spent his early career singing on street corners and in restaurants, shunned by record producers. But as other great Mexican crooners left the scene, space opened up for the mustached cowboy from a ranch outside of Guadalajara.

VARGAS: (Speaking Spanish).

KAHN: “His brand is important. He will always be one of the icons of Mexican music, ”Vargas tells me as musicians warm up around us backstage at a recent International Mariachi Festival in Guadalajara, Jalisco.

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON # 1: (Vocalising).

KAHN: Tonight, the Guadalajara Philharmonic Orchestra is seated behind Vargas’ 14-member mariachi band.

(EXTRACT FROM THE ARCHIVED RECORD)

MARIACHI VARGAS DE TECALITLAN: (Song in Spanish).

KAHN: Seats were up to a hundred dollars a ticket. That’s a pretty impressive price tag, considering mariachi’s humble origins, says Jon Clark.

JON CLARK: It was the music of the poor.

KAHN: Clark, now 69, has been performing, studying, and writing about mariachi music for decades. He says that although its roots probably go back to the arrival of Hernan Cortes on the shores of Mexico – the Spanish conquistador traveled with troubadours – historians have not paid much attention to mainly rural and indigenous music. . He says it’s until after the Mexican Revolution.

CLARK: When the indigenous culture was exalted unlike the regime of Porfirio Diaz, where everything was Eurocentric. But by then, much of the story had been lost.

KAHN: Many cities in Mexico, especially in Vicente Fernandez’s hometown of Jalisco, claim the origin of mariachi. Cocula, not far from Guadalajara, calls itself the birthplace of mariachi, with a small museum and traveling musicians.

(EXTRACT FROM THE RINGING OF THE CHURCH BELLS)

KAHN: On Sundays, the youth group from the local mariachi school perform at midday mass just after crossing the street, still in their finest brass-studded costumes and perform in the town square.

(MUSIC EXTRACT)

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON # 2: (Singing in Spanish).

KAHN: Vicente Fernandez’s tunes are always favorites with crowds strolling through the public park or sitting on benches, enjoying a quiet Sunday with the family. Many join in the shameless singing, the pitch and the air be damned.

UNIDENTIFIED GROUP: (Singing in Spanish).

KAHN: While still a sentimental favorite, the genre has lost its appeal with younger generations. Fernandez despised crossover artists, even his own son, who produced many pop songs as well as mariachi favorites. And that worries Magdalena Vazquez, 52 years old.

MAGDALENA VAZQUEZ: (Speaking Spanish).

KAHN: “Frankly, today’s music doesn’t have a message,” she says as she sells Tupperware and COVID masks right next to Cocula’s Plaza. Its small stand is in front of the huge bust of the city in honor of Vicente Fernandez.

VAZQUEZ: (Speaking Spanish).

KAHN: “I have two daughters, and I asked them, how is a boy going to seduce you, win you over, with what song,” she asks. Her husband hides his face in his hands and laughs. It was these old traditional hardcore fans who kept Fernandez’s music alive for more than five decades. Fernandez came up against the younger generations who were more awake than their parents. In January, he half-heartedly apologized after images emerged of him groping a fan’s chest as they posed for a photo. In 2019, he said he refused a liver transplant, fearing it could come from a gay man. But for the diehards, Fernandez’s legacy has survived such transgressions. He has always professed to be driven by his dedicated audience, as he said at a farewell concert in Mexico City in 2016.

(EXTRACT FROM THE ARCHIVED RECORD)

FERNANDEZ: (Speaking Spanish).

KAHN: Seeming to be holding back tears, he said, “it was always about your affection, respect and applause” and, as he sings in the song “El Rey”, not fame or glory. richness.

(EXTRACT FROM THE SONG, “EL REY”)

FERNANDEZ: (Speaking Spanish).

KAHN: Fernandez’s music will live on. It would appear that there are dozens of previously recorded songs to be released upon his death, allowing him to stay, as he sings here, the King.

(EXTRACT FROM THE SONG, “EL REY”)

FERNANDEZ: (Song in Spanish).

KAHN: Carrie Kahn, NPR News, Cocula, Mexico.

(EXTRACT FROM THE SONG BY VICENT FERNANDEZ, “VOLVER, VOLVER”)

Copyright © 2021 NPR. All rights reserved. See the terms of use and permissions pages on our website at www.npr.org for more information.

NPR transcripts are created within an emergency time frame by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR entrepreneur, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative recording of NPR’s programming is the audio recording.


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The Sense of Family for Brotherhood Sac State Latino, Alpha Psi Lambda https://disturbmedia.com/the-sense-of-family-for-brotherhood-sac-state-latino-alpha-psi-lambda/ https://disturbmedia.com/the-sense-of-family-for-brotherhood-sac-state-latino-alpha-psi-lambda/#respond Tue, 12 Oct 2021 20:17:28 +0000 https://disturbmedia.com/the-sense-of-family-for-brotherhood-sac-state-latino-alpha-psi-lambda/ Accounting student Raul Bárcenas’ freshman year in Sacramento State came to a screeching halt due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and he returned home to San Pablo des Residence Halls earlier than he did. had foreseen it. Fortunately, he said he found Sac State very welcoming, which led him to join the Alpha Psi Lambda fraternity […]]]>

Accounting student Raul Bárcenas’ freshman year in Sacramento State came to a screeching halt due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and he returned home to San Pablo des Residence Halls earlier than he did. had foreseen it.

Fortunately, he said he found Sac State very welcoming, which led him to join the Alpha Psi Lambda fraternity online.

Alpha Psi Lambda is Sac State’s only mixed Latin American fraternity and currently has around 60 members according to Luis Sanchez, president of Alpha Psi Lambda. There are 40 alumni, 15 inactive members and five active members currently in the fraternity.

Inactive members are still members, except they choose not to be part of the planning with the board made up of the active members, according to Sanchez. Being inactive doesn’t mean students can’t attend events, it just means they wouldn’t actively create ideas for fellowship or be part of meetings.

“We have a lot of people of Hispanic and non-Hispanic backgrounds, but because we’re a Latino organization, one of the biggest cultural factors in the Latino or Hispanic tradition is family,” Sanchez said. “In the family, he should not be united by blood, but more united by relationships and united by bonds. It’s kind of something that we try to focus on with our organization, and that’s where we bring the Latino factor. “

Sanchez explained that brotherhood is more than what they consider friends. Each member’s background and culture all contribute to what they call their “familia”.

Alpha Psi Lambda secretary Raul Bárcenas attends the fraternity’s weekly board meeting on zoom. Raul joined the fraternity in his first year online during the Spring 2020 semester. (Erick Salgado)

Bárcenas said the Latino factor and focus on family would end up being a major aspect of his decision to join the fraternity.

“For us [family], it means the next level beyond just being a friend, ”Bárcenas said. “It’s being there for someone, even if they are active or inactive. It seemed like when I joined, it was like I had known these people for the longest time even though I had just met them. It was hard to describe.

Bárcenas added that he believes allowing the fellowship to be co-ed allows new members to view the chapter as more accessible and user-friendly for those interested in joining.

“Once you join, you kind of become part of a family that always communicates with each other,” he said. “They always check in, they always want to make sure you are doing your best and to hold you accountable.”

The fraternity’s family isn’t just about holding each member to account or registering, according to Bárcenas. In the case of Fellowship Treasurer and External Vice-President Julianna Murrieta, it also means becoming more educated about their own Latin culture.

“I’m Mexican, but I grew up with parents who spoke to me mainly English, so I don’t really know Spanish,” Murietta said. “A lot of my friends know Spanish very well, although they don’t make me uncomfortable, they make me feel included. Our members are trying to educate us, so I really feel more confident in some aspects of my culture. ”

Despite being labeled as a Latino fraternity, Murrieta stressed that the fraternity is not just for Latino or Hispanic students.

Everyone tries to learn and understand the traditions of others.

– Luis Sanchez, President of Alpha Psi Lambda

“Even though a huge connotation to our fraternity is that we are Latino based, we try not to overdo it because we want people to feel open and invited to join, no matter what. [their] background, ”Murrieta said.

Murrieta added that while someone doesn’t have to be Latino to join the fraternity, they should do well to learn more about Latino culture.

Sanchez added that the chapter’s next event is to celebrate Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead).

“We want to host an event that connects everyone to music, dance, culture, so everyone here on campus feels invited to join with any kind of background,” Sanchez said. “Everyone tries to learn and understand the traditions of others. “

Sanchez explained what Latino culture means to him, especially after growing up in a predominantly white environment.

“It’s hard to feel included or to feel motivated because all I saw were people who belonged to the white community,” Sanchez said. “When I saw this organization [with] people of my own race and people of my own background, it makes people feel more included or welcomed. ”

Despite being the only mixed Latin American fraternity on campus, Sanchez and Murrieta said they have luckily met with nothing but praise, help and respect from other Greek organizations.

“The other day I stopped and saw somebody from Kappa Delta Chi, and she asked us how we were doing with our recruiting, and she was just like ‘you guys keep going, you’re doing fine. “,” Murrieta mentioned. If anything, we kind of ask for tips.

Sanchez said he had also had positive interactions with other Greek organizations on campus.

Alpha Psi Lambda members (left to right) Luis Sanchez, David Ramirez, Martha Chavez and Julianna Murrieta show off their fellowship letters during the first week on campus. Photo provided by Luis Sanchez.

“I feel like Sac State in general provides a really good warm and welcoming atmosphere, especially with other organizations,” Sanchez said. “When I see someone else with different letters, or if they see me with my letters, it’s always like, ‘Oh, I love your letters,’ or vice versa. “I didn’t really see or feel any judgment or the feeling that I needed to be better. “

As Murrieta mentioned earlier, one of the greatest connotations of the brotherhood is the fact that it is labeled as a Latin American brotherhood. Sanchez said that, unfortunately, integrating the Latin aspect of the fellowship has proven difficult due to the fact that COVID-19 is sending the fellowship back in some of the goals it has set for itself.

One of the biggest challenges Alpha Psi Lambda has faced as a result of the pandemic is recruiting more members for the fellowship. Sanchez said the pandemic has affected the organization to the point that it hasn’t even been able to recruit new members this fall semester.

“We had a bit of a rough start because it’s been a tough transition for everyone, with the schedules and meeting times it’s a bit tough,” Sanchez said. “We have decided not to recruit this semester so that we can rebuild and restructure our board of directors and our chapter here on campus.”

The fraternity created a substitute for recruiting new members by posting a Linktree link on their Instagram page. Sanchez said those who wish to join the fraternity can complete the form provided to be contacted and invited to events this semester.

“We’re going to repeat it all the time, but familia, familia, familia: letting people know that we will be there for them, even if they are not members, letting them know that if they are new to campus, There’s always going to be a group they can always count on, ”said Bárcenas.

Sanchez said the Day of the Dead event will take place on November 2 and everyone is always welcome to ask him questions via Instagram or email because “they are there for you as students and as brothers and sisters of Alpha Psi Lambda. “


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